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Sound Level Meter around 100$, max 200$
Old 9th April 2017
  #1
Gear Maniac
 

Thread Starter
Sound Level Meter around 100$, max 200$

Hi,

after having done some research I wasn't able to find the product I need and thomann has a limited range of products of this categroy with rather big price gaps so I am asking for help here. What I need is a digital handheld SPL meter with the following characteristics:

- weighting curve A and C
- measuring at least from 30dB to 130dB
- 20Hz -20kHz frequency range (seems a tough one, most budget ones are
around 30Hz to 8kHz)

If there are products still within the budget having following features would be great, but I can live without:

- spectrum analyzer in 1/8 bands
- USB connection (for transfering statistics)

I hope there is a product meeting my criteria within a maximum of 200$. Most spl meters between 50-100$ have the curves and dB range I need, but I don't get why measuring up to 20kHz makes the price jump up to several hundreds of $...

Thanks in advance for your answers.
Old 13th April 2017
  #2
Gear Maniac
 

Thread Starter
So nobody knows about a soundpressure level meter that measures up to 20kHz under 200$?
Old 13th April 2017
  #3
Gear Addict
 
esldude's Avatar
 

A creative approach that will work.

Dayton Audio iMM-6 Calibrated Measurement Microphone for Tablets iPhone iPad and Android

I have had trouble getting these to always work with Android phones even if they have TRRS headphone plugs. They sometimes just chop off response at 8 khz.

With Iphones and Ipads that still have the analog headphone jack, you get a frequency response calibration file, works 18hz to 20 khz (yes really I have tried one). Any number of noise apps will use this input. Those can be calibrated against a real SLM and then you are ready to go. A short TRRS extension cable is often nice to have as well.

Dayton also make a UMM6 or you might look at a minidsp UMIK1. Those are USB measuring microphones. I know with the UMIK1 you can connect to REW software on mac or pc and it calibrates itself and that software has an SLM function. What I haven't tried which very well might work is using these USB mics with an OTG cable connected to a smartphone and feeding one of those noise measuring apps.

Dayton Audio UMM-6 USB Measurement Microphone

miniDSP UMIK-1 Omni-directional USB Measurement Calibrated Microphone

If you were to use these with a Macbook or PC laptop the good news is REW software can do lots of useful measurements beyond just sound levels. Not knowing how portable you need this to be not sure which your best option is.
Old 13th April 2017
  #4
Lives for gear
 

Budget Sound level meters aren't full frequency as you've already discovered. A weighting is what' most commonly used in audio most and will measure up to 6 or 7K .

C weighting covers a wider frequency response but its not as linear as the human ear. Its usually used for Peak measurements. Some meters switchable A/C weighting so you can have both.

If you want a Flat frequency throughout the frequency range you need a Z weighted meter. They replace the old linear and un-weighted meters and measurements are expressed as dBZ or dB(Z). You're better off using the A, C or A/C weighted meters for most testing purposes because they will give you actual decibels.

My question would be what do you plan on using the meter for. If like most, you pump pink or what noise through speakers to set levels a simple A weighted will do that. If you have speakers with separate woofer and tweeter adjustments then a C meter will let you set the tweeter output levels. You just have to realize human hearing isn't linear and the dB levels you set lows and highs from a meter wont be the same as the perceived loudness you'd hear as being equal.

You have to look at a Fletcher Munson chart to understand how the ears hear sounds as being equal at different frequencies and different power levels in order to calibrate woofers vs mids and tweeters to get them balanced. The meter will be linear in decibels but not linear to the way we actually hear. Lows may need to be set to 100db, compared to tweeters of 20db to make them sound equal in volume to the ears because the ears have different sensitivity. If you set the highs and lows to the same dB level you wont even be able to hear the bass because you'd have 400X too much treble. The settings change depending on how loud the overall volume is. This is why most use white noise, test it A weighted, set the volume levels, then tweak highs to where they sound best at any given volume level.

Of course if you know all this, I'd simply buy a budget meter unless you're doing some kind of scientific work. I bought an A weighted meter from parts express for $25 bucks and it works like a champ setting up Studio monitors, Hi Fi speakers, PA cabs etc. I even use it for calibrating how much volume guitar pedals produce so I don't have big jumps in volume.

http://www.parts-express.com/mini-di...m_campaign=pla

They used to sell an A weighted for $10 more but they must have run out of them.

If you want something highly accurate that has both A and C weighting, and is ANSI compliant you'll easily spend $300 or more. This one for example covers all those bases and its one of the less expansive pro models. http://www.tequipment.net/BK735.html...FdC3wAodJCME-Q
Old 13th April 2017
  #5
Gear Maniac
 

Thread Starter
Thanks for the suggestions!

@esldude: that imm-6 looks pretty handy for on the go measurments and I have an iphone 5s so it should work if calibrated. I prefer not to goo the usb route, would like it more portable. I'll probably get a more standard SLM anyway and then see if I will buy the imm-6 mic too, dosn't cost that much.

@wrgkmc:
Thanks for the detailed information, seems like you're pretty well informed about the topic. I guess it may be helpful if I explain how I am planning to use it.

My main reason for getting an Spl meter is ensuring healthy listening levels. As I work for hours in the studio with headphones, I don't know how sensitive my ears are and I have read that with headphones one tends to listen at high levels, I wanted to check out how loud I am listening to music through headphones. I thought to do this by playing back some music-tracks at a volume that feels comfortable to me and see how loud it is. And if it is louder than 80dBs I will try to turn the volume down and get used to it so that I can work for around 8 hours without damaging my hearing. I just have to find out how to get realistic levels because usually one ear listens only to one cup so I would have to send one channel at a time and measure the cups one by one. Or just put it between the 2 cups and subtract 3dB..and as my headphones (HD 800) are quite big I'll have to find the spot at which the ear is located inside the cup. But that has nothing to do with this thread and maybe the differences are small and I am overanalyzing.
Of course I will measure the loudness of my studio monitors too but there it should be easier and as I am listening to them at very low levels usually I doubt that I am working in a problematic way.
I thought to use it in noisy places generally (especially clubs) to see where the loudness is excessive and I need earplugs and to get to know my ears to estimate when a sound is too loud and should be avoided.
-> I thought to do this all using the C-weighting as it shows real dB levels that
reach our eardrum and unlike A-weighting is not calibrated to our perception of loudness. Overestimating loudness is always better than underestimating IMO.

My secondary purpose is using it as helpful tool for mixing. I would listen to my mixed tracks at 68, 74, 80 and 86 dB on hedphones aswell as monitors and check out how the balance of the frequency-sectrum changes at those levels.
- > I would use A weighting for this as it is more accurate when it comes to human perception.

The reason I wanted the meter to be able to measure loudness from 20Hz to 20KHz is that in some cases there may be a sound/noise that has a lot of energy over 8KHz and if that range is neglected the meter may not show a realistic value.

I found this one on Thomann. It of course has only response from 30Hz to 8KHz and no spectrum analyzer but seems good price for value:
https://www.thomann.de/it/digital_so...Meter_132900_0

I also found this one, with all the features I requested and many more usefull features but it costs more than 300$. Don't know if I should really spend this much on a SPL meter for those things that I'd like to do:
https://www.thomann.de/it/phonic_paa...f=search_prv_6
Old 15th April 2017
  #6
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esldude's Avatar
 

The little electret mics in most smart phones have good response from 10 hz on up to 15 khz or sometimes more. They roll off the input somewhere below 200 hz to cut out handling noise. Low frequency noise isn't as damaging on hearing I don't think. So an app for your phone might do to measure when out and about to protect hearing in clubs.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/deci...448155923?mt=8

A,B, C, and Z weighting. I would check it with a real meter just to be sure.
Old 15th April 2017
  #7
Gear Maniac
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by esldude View Post
The little electret mics in most smart phones have good response from 10 hz on up to 15 khz or sometimes more. They roll off the input somewhere below 200 hz to cut out handling noise. Low frequency noise isn't as damaging on hearing I don't think. So an app for your phone might do to measure when out and about to protect hearing in clubs.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/deci...448155923?mt=8

A,B, C, and Z weighting. I would check it with a real meter just to be sure.
Thanks, got the app, for 2,50€ it's worth a try. Don't know how accurate the app, the iphone 5s mic (didn't find an official frequency response graph) and especially my measuring methods are, but I gave it a try with my monitors and headphones.
For measuring monitors I just placed the iphone where usually my head is and pointing the mic towards the front. Seems to be between 60 and 70 dB with all weightings.
For measuring headphones I tried placing the microphone first at the center of the headphones with both channels active and later I measured the cups individually by only activating the respective channel and pressing the mic against the cup. I also did the latter with both L+R active. I don't know if the dBs decrease when the cups are not isolated and with the HD800 it is not possible to press them against each other but the values were between 70 and 80dB with all weightings in all tests so I guess I am running no risks and can work for as long as I feel like.

However I think I will still get a real spl meter and try to inform myself about how to make accurate measurements because there are too many approximations and variables in the measurements I did now quickly and there is still a lot of other stuff to be measured.
Old 15th April 2017
  #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthbrass View Post
Thanks for the suggestions!

@esldude: that imm-6 looks pretty handy for on the go measurments and I have an iphone 5s so it should work if calibrated. I prefer not to goo the usb route, would like it more portable. I'll probably get a more standard SLM anyway and then see if I will buy the imm-6 mic too, dosn't cost that much.

@wrgkmc:
Thanks for the detailed information, seems like you're pretty well informed about the topic. I guess it may be helpful if I explain how I am planning to use it.

My main reason for getting an Spl meter is ensuring healthy listening levels. As I work for hours in the studio with headphones, I don't know how sensitive my ears are and I have read that with headphones one tends to listen at high levels, I wanted to check out how loud I am listening to music through headphones. I thought to do this by playing back some music-tracks at a volume that feels comfortable to me and see how loud it is. And if it is louder than 80dBs I will try to turn the volume down and get used to it so that I can work for around 8 hours without damaging my hearing. I just have to find out how to get realistic levels because usually one ear listens only to one cup so I would have to send one channel at a time and measure the cups one by one. Or just put it between the 2 cups and subtract 3dB..and as my headphones (HD 800) are quite big I'll have to find the spot at which the ear is located inside the cup. But that has nothing to do with this thread and maybe the differences are small and I am overanalyzing.
Of course I will measure the loudness of my studio monitors too but there it should be easier and as I am listening to them at very low levels usually I doubt that I am working in a problematic way.
I thought to use it in noisy places generally (especially clubs) to see where the loudness is excessive and I need earplugs and to get to know my ears to estimate when a sound is too loud and should be avoided.
-> I thought to do this all using the C-weighting as it shows real dB levels that
reach our eardrum and unlike A-weighting is not calibrated to our perception of loudness. Overestimating loudness is always better than underestimating IMO.

My secondary purpose is using it as helpful tool for mixing. I would listen to my mixed tracks at 68, 74, 80 and 86 dB on hedphones aswell as monitors and check out how the balance of the frequency-sectrum changes at those levels.
- > I would use A weighting for this as it is more accurate when it comes to human perception.

The reason I wanted the meter to be able to measure loudness from 20Hz to 20KHz is that in some cases there may be a sound/noise that has a lot of energy over 8KHz and if that range is neglected the meter may not show a realistic value.

I found this one on Thomann. It of course has only response from 30Hz to 8KHz and no spectrum analyzer but seems good price for value:
https://www.thomann.de/it/digital_so...Meter_132900_0

I also found this one, with all the features I requested and many more usefull features but it costs more than 300$. Don't know if I should really spend this much on a SPL meter for those things that I'd like to do:
https://www.thomann.de/it/phonic_paa...f=search_prv_6
If you are trying to get a read on MUSIC and are hung up over +/-3dB you are going to find out that the music will not sit still for you to tell if you are +/-3dB from any kind of reference because music does not sit still. If you spend your time listening to noise or tones well maybe you will know. For what you are needing the meter for IMHO the z weighted free SPLM apps on your phone will do fine.

I think having a consitant day to day reading is more important than having a reading tied to the national bureau of standards.


Better to err on the safe side no matter which kind of SPL monitoring you use.
Old 16th April 2017
  #9
I have a Phonic PAA2 i got on ebay for about oh $100 or something. Its ok, it works as advertised, response is a liiiittle slow, like it doesnt have a screamin processor or something, but you get everything you need. Its like a .5 - 1 second delay on the meters, not bad.

The PAA3 is the current model. Search for deals, theyre kind of rare and frankly pretty expensive and may not be worth it unless you find one cheap. Very cool and fun though.

ETA: Its a spectrum analyzer too, does all sorts of stuff
Old 17th April 2017
  #10
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jlaws's Avatar
Some of the apps are more accurate than others. Someone compiled a list of apps and how accurate they are, but I don't have the link anymore. The app that performed best, though is SPLnFFT.
Old 18th April 2017
  #11
Gear Maniac
 

Thread Starter
Actually that SPLnFFT app looks very tasty, I think I'll get that one too..and maybe that litte mic for the iphone, just to be sure the frequency response is okay.

And if I can find a Paa3 at a very resonable price I'll get one, otherwise for now I'll just stick with the app.

Thank you all guys for the advice
Old 18th April 2017
  #12
Another thing about using you phone as your SPLM is you are likely to have it with you when you are needing it.
Old 18th April 2017
  #13
Gear Maniac
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by philsaudio View Post
Another thing about using you phone as your SPLM is you are likely to have it with you when you are needing it.
Yes that's true too. Sometimes things are much simpler than they initially seem to be.
Old 19th April 2017
  #14
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthbrass View Post
Thanks for the suggestions!

@esldude: that imm-6 looks pretty handy for on the go measurments and I have an iphone 5s so it should work if calibrated. I prefer not to goo the usb route, would like it more portable. I'll probably get a more standard SLM anyway and then see if I will buy the imm-6 mic too, dosn't cost that much.

@wrgkmc:
Thanks for the detailed information, seems like you're pretty well informed about the topic. I guess it may be helpful if I explain how I am planning to use it.

My main reason for getting an Spl meter is ensuring healthy listening levels. As I work for hours in the studio with headphones, I don't know how sensitive my ears are and I have read that with headphones one tends to listen at high levels, I wanted to check out how loud I am listening to music through headphones. I thought to do this by playing back some music-tracks at a volume that feels comfortable to me and see how loud it is. And if it is louder than 80dBs I will try to turn the volume down and get used to it so that I can work for around 8 hours without damaging my hearing. I just have to find out how to get realistic levels because usually one ear listens only to one cup so I would have to send one channel at a time and measure the cups one by one. Or just put it between the 2 cups and subtract 3dB..and as my headphones (HD 800) are quite big I'll have to find the spot at which the ear is located inside the cup. But that has nothing to do with this thread and maybe the differences are small and I am overanalyzing.
Of course I will measure the loudness of my studio monitors too but there it should be easier and as I am listening to them at very low levels usually I doubt that I am working in a problematic way.
I thought to use it in noisy places generally (especially clubs) to see where the loudness is excessive and I need earplugs and to get to know my ears to estimate when a sound is too loud and should be avoided.
-> I thought to do this all using the C-weighting as it shows real dB levels that
reach our eardrum and unlike A-weighting is not calibrated to our perception of loudness. Overestimating loudness is always better than underestimating IMO.

My secondary purpose is using it as helpful tool for mixing. I would listen to my mixed tracks at 68, 74, 80 and 86 dB on hedphones aswell as monitors and check out how the balance of the frequency-sectrum changes at those levels.
- > I would use A weighting for this as it is more accurate when it comes to human perception.

The reason I wanted the meter to be able to measure loudness from 20Hz to 20KHz is that in some cases there may be a sound/noise that has a lot of energy over 8KHz and if that range is neglected the meter may not show a realistic value.

I found this one on Thomann. It of course has only response from 30Hz to 8KHz and no spectrum analyzer but seems good price for value:
https://www.thomann.de/it/digital_so...Meter_132900_0

I also found this one, with all the features I requested and many more usefull features but it costs more than 300$. Don't know if I should really spend this much on a SPL meter for those things that I'd like to do:
https://www.thomann.de/it/phonic_paa...f=search_prv_6

Not sure how well you're going to be able to actually set the headphones to the right level that way. Using an SPL meter in the open air to measure loudness isn't going to be the same as what you're ears hear with closed back headphones sealed against you head.

There's going to be increased compression/suction on the ear drums with the headphones sealed against your head and therefore higher SPL levels.

Even a little air leakage from pads will throw the levels off. I don't think the SPL will read the proper levels from the elements simply placing the meters near the driver.

You also have the fact that you'd only be measuring one element. Total DB's have to be for both ears. I'm not even sure an inexpensive meter will read accurately at 41.5 dB. The one I have bottoms out in the 40's or 50's in a dead silent room.

If you had decent meters, you'd have to bury the meters inside something like a dummy head which had ear canals and focus the air suction on the mix as headphones do on actual ear drums. Then place headphones over both meters and take an average.

I think there's might be a mathematical formula involving dual elements which you have to use too. I'd have to do some digging to find it again. This isn't the kind of stuff you deal with every day but I've done some work in that area involving acoustic design that likely applies.

I know when you add two speakers together using the same wattage you get a slight boost in volume due to increased surface area and cab resonance. (3dB stick in my mind, but I'll need to double check)

The same kind of formulas should apply to dual transducers except you'd likely need to use them in reverse. Instead of gaining 3dB, it might subtract 3dB so the sum of the two might need to be higher to compensate for using 2 meters.

There is likely another issue involving distance too. Speaker dB levels are taken at 1Khz at 1 meter when measuring. You could use the meter at a farther distance to get the dB right for your listening levels. Measuring within an inch of the ear drum must have frequency exaggerations the ears hear up close which the meter wont hear in the open air.

I should mention I used headphones for 10 years mixing and it truly sucks. Ears fatigue so quickly using them. Even today I only use them for tracking vocals.

I have 20 sets of phones of various quality, makes and models. The ones I been using lately are the two sets of AKG's I got within the past year of so.

One sets was a more expensive open backed design, and the other set were a budget, closed backed set. I was surprised at how good the closed backed set was because I cant tell much of a difference between them.

Both are designed for low volume mixing/tracking. A drummer for example would have a hard time using because they can only be cranked up so high.

The AKG's match the loudness of my studio monitors running around 83dB. The frequency response is nearly identical too. If I crank the headphone amp up to about 3/4, (below the point where the headphone amp causes hiss or noise), loudness between having the headphone on or off is about 1:1.

Every other set I've owned would be boosted up quite a bit and then you run into gain staging issues trying to get instruments to sound right. I suspect this might be an issue you're having and its why you're wanting to get the levels to studio standards. I believe AKG intentionally makes they're headphones to target a perceived loudness of 83db with them cranked.

I'm thinking you could simply buy a set of the inexpensive AKG,s which sell for around $40 and forget the meter. I don't think you can get the perceived loudness up above 85 or 90db max with even the loudest headphone amps.


As I said I don't use them for mixing much. I wasted 10 years trying to mix with headphones all through the 80's. Studio monitors were insanely expensive back then.

I thought I could get a good enough mix using headphones only. I tried every mixing trick in the book too. I though the problems were being caused by the rest of my gear. I was simply fooling myself. I learned allot doing things that way but so much time wasted you simply wont get back. Monitors are by far the most important tool in the chain. You realize that when you own them.

I made hundreds of recordings that all suffer from the same issues. Two dimensionality. One out of 20 I got lucky and had it sound like a decent demo recording but it was mostly dumb luck.

You simply cant get past the fact headphones have no cross feed like speakers have in the open air. You need to use you outer ears for judging distance. They aren't being used with headphones clamped over them.
Speakers are physically in front of you and the center of the image is between your eyes.

Headphones are to your extreme l left and right and the center of the image is inside your skull. No matter how much you try you are handicapped in judging distance. Setting up all your time based effects like reverb, echo chorus will all be skewed to weird sizes. There is allot of work you can do on headphones, setting up your stereo panorama and tweaking fine details. The final tweaks using verbs, setting gains and EQ must be done on speakers.

Best solution for ear fatigue is to get studio monitors. I nailed a set of M-Audio BX-5's for $200 on sale. Fantastic deal for the price. They have other inexpensive one that do a wonderful job.

Even if noise is an issue 83 DB isn't very loud. Its no louder then listening to a television and even if your walls are paper thin the neighbors shouldn't complain.

Last edited by wrgkmc; 19th April 2017 at 10:59 PM..
Old 21st April 2017
  #15
Gear Maniac
 

Thread Starter
Thanks for the extensive answer and the advice. I however got used to working with my headphones and the mixes translate sufficiently well onto other systems (nobody who gave me feedback critisized my mixes except that sometimes I exaggerate a little bit on the highs). With monitors however I have a lot of trouble getting the details right, probably a combination of not so good monitors (KRK Rokit 8) that are too big for my room, which btw is not treated properly (and treating is no option in my current situation). And I do not work a lot with acoustic music where the goal in the mix creating the illusion of musicians on a stage in front of you anyway. In future I will probably use another room, treat it and get good monitors but for now I am fine with working with headphones.

However can you maybe recommend a method for approximately measuring the headphone loudness that may be a little simpler than getting multiple meters, a dummy head etc? Eventually sacrificing a few dBs of accuracy but at least a possibility to assure a healthy headphone level without listening at annoyingly low levels that may not be even necessary, just to ensure it does not go over 80dB.
Old 21st April 2017
  #16
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I thought on this a bit and it may be doable, but you should understand why you are doing this.

Bob Katz is the one who came up with this standard that's been adopted by most studios now. He goes into detail about it in his book.
This page covers much of it here. https://www.digido.com/portfolio-ite...ctices-part-2/

The key to this calibration is to have your monitors (or headphones in your case) set to a fixed "Maximum" loudness level with an 83dB level, and your RMS music level of a completed mix coming in at the correct levels.

This means your DAW meters which read peak levels may be peaking at 0db and your RMS level (which you don't see on the DAW meters is in the -12~-16dB range.
Some DAW programs like Sonar which I use allows me to switch between RMS and Peak levels and I also have a peak hold which allows me to gauge what my meters are reading.

The thing that's notable here is your mixes will come in below 83dB before the record is mastered. How much lower depends on how much dynamic response you want the music to retain. If you're doing acoustic stuff, I suspect you'll want allot of dynamics, since those instruments do produce it.

When you are mixing solo tracks your volume levels of tracks wont be near the full 83dB. That is only a perceived ceiling where the final mix is comfortably loud compared to what your meters are reading. Like I said you'll be working below that most of the time with only your peaks getting there.
I don't think your idea of using various ceilings is something you'll want to mess with. You can surely increase or decrease the levels as needed but the main idea is to calibrate a home base you can always come back to. In the end you may wind up marking your headphone level knob using a sliver of masking tape and that's where you set it and forget it. All your tweaking will be done in the box after that using your meters as a guide line.

As far as testing the headphones, the only thing I could think of is to take a small block or wood or Styrofoam.
You can cut a hole in it so you can insert the meter, then cup the headphone over it.

Again, I don't know how well this will work. I suspect you'd need to set a single headphone to around 42dB. The pair will give you double that level.

What most suggest you do is set your monitors for 83 dB as outlined here, Monitor Wizard |
then adjust your headphones to give a similar subjective level as you put them on or take them off. Measurements would be done with the speakers and the actual headphone level a judgement call. I suspect this would be the best method, and as I mentioned, Its they way I've always done it.

If I get a chance this weekend, I'll see if I can try this for you and see what kind of readings I'm getting from my headphones.
I calibrated my system recently and simply need to run a pink/white noise signal through the daw. I can then set my headphones as a best guess match and do the test with the dB meter easy enough. I even have a piece of foam to try it. Hopefully it might give you some useful info to work with and I'd like to know myself if the headphones are actually reading a similar level to the monitors. I really don't think so. I suspect the dB level is much lower and its simply a perceived loudness due to the close proximity.

If there is something that's definitely readable, I know allot of people who post here use headphones and may find some value knowing vs guessing what the right level is. I'm just not very confident. Headphones are not very linear and any bumps in the bass range will throw the settings way off. I should be able to confirm that too because I have both high end bones which I know are quite linear and others which are definitely not. if I set the level to the headphones largest hump in the frequency response, all other frequencies will be lower then normal making the whole calibration process useless. (It's why no one bothers with)

I always like to know first hand myself. If there's anything of value there I'll pass it on to you. Hopefully your headphones are fairly linear and have similar SPL levels.
Old 23rd April 2017
  #17
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zvukofor's Avatar
No need for external mic to use with SPLnFFT. You're measuring average pressure, no need for high FR precision. Some live engineers use Audio RTA spectrum analyser app with built-in iphone mic and it works nice. It is not a scientific precise measurement anyway.
Old 24th April 2017
  #18
Gear Addict
 

Think about it for a sec. A phone app has to be used with all different kinds of microphones as they vary across brands, so your results will be different across different phones.

If you say well not me because I have an iphone, they also use different vendors for the mics in iphones.

I recently went through all this measuring and treating my room with REW.

I picked up a Galaxy Audio CM130 from Amazon for 50.00

It meets all the specs you mentioned above.
Old 25th April 2017
  #19
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zvukofor's Avatar
Well, specs deviations in not expensive measurement mics are not small at all too!
As i've said, iPhone mic is enough for level measurement. Even spectrum analysis is OK for live needs, after all it is just a little helper to our ears.
Old 25th April 2017
  #20
Gear Maniac
 

Thread Starter
Ok thanks again guys, I will just get the SPLnFFT app for now. It's a pity that accurate headphone volume measuring is so complicated but I will try to calibrate my monitors with the app and as described in the Monitor Wizard article set the headphones to a similar level by ear.
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