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Which one of these Interface has better pre amp
Old 21st March 2017
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
ikamy's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Which one of these Interface has better pre amp

just read this article on GS about top five audio interface under 300$

TOP FIVE AUDIO INTERFACES UNDER 300$

● Audient iD14
● Steinberg UR44
● Focusrite Scarlett 6i6 (2nd generation)
● Native Instruments Komplete Audio 6
● Behringer U-Phoria UMC404HD

I have plans to buy a microphone (Under 300$) and a headphone (Under 300$) too

The important notes here are
● Prefer to buy a new model which has a good support in case of driver update and connection ports (like USB 3 or ... never tested firewire ?!)
● I made a vocal booth and Im recording in the same environment Im mixing, I prefer to have 2 headphone output (and Im sure its necessary)
● Low latency
● Would be nice if it has more than one pair of monitors output (Im gonna add Sub woofer soon)
MIDI in (because my old digital piano doesnt have USB)


I dont have any technical information to compare the pre amps of these interfaces,
the last interface I had (M-Audio fast track pro had a terrible amp)

I can spend about 400$ on the interfaces (100$ more than this article suggestion if it is necessary)

I want to be able record vocals in a reasonable volume without noise and use headphone for mixing (not in low volume)

I appreciate your help in advance
Old 21st March 2017
  #2
Here for the gear
 
c0nan's Avatar
 

My vote goes to Audient, since they use the design of their console preamps for their whole range (not sure about the ID4). I got the ID14 myself and am more than happy with it. If 2 inputs (+ digital option) are enough you definitely should give it a try.
Old 21st March 2017
  #3
Gear Maniac
 
esldude's Avatar
 

I think all those on your list are good solid devices. I doubt any have a big advantage over others on the list. I would base my decision upon how many and what type inputs and outputs I think I need. Maybe even down to which one looks and feels the coolest. I have been where you are and agonized way too much over what are tiny or non-existent differences. Form, function, inputs, outputs that is what to look at here.

Matter of fact I would say don't spend $400 on this. Keep it to $300. Keep the headphones to $200 or if you have to $300. Then you have $400 or $500 for the microphone. The headphone might limit how good it sounds to you, but it won't really limit how well you can get something recorded. The microphone will limit how good it gets recorded. Transducers are the place to spend the most money. In this case the microphone.
Old 21st March 2017
  #4
Gear Maniac
 
ikamy's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Thank you guys
Two more important thing

● Prefer to buy a new model which has a good support in case of driver update and connection ports (like USB 3 or ... never tested firewire ?!)
● I made a vocal booth and Im recording in the same environment Im mixing, I prefer to have 2 headphone output (and Im sure its necessary)

I want to buy a model which is not discontinued or dont support by the factory anymore
In case of updating driver

For example my last interface didnt have Windows 10 driver
Which makes it works unstable

And whats your input on Lexicon I-O 22?
Ive hear good things about their pre amps
I know it has one headphone output though

Also do I need digital output??

Lexicon IO 22
Old 21st March 2017
  #5
Lives for gear
 
bgood's Avatar
Before u spend $$ on a mic I hope you've treated your room... I'd also try installing the latest drivers your current interface has into win 10 and see if it works... If it's a 64 bit driver it probably still works perfectly.
Old 21st March 2017
  #6
Gear Maniac
 
ikamy's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgood View Post
Before u spend $$ on a mic I hope you've treated your room... I'd also try installing the latest drivers your current interface has into win 10 and see if it works... If it's a 64 bit driver it probably still works perfectly.
I did last year
This year I added a mini handmade booth for vocal

And yes It has x64 driver but its unstable
If there was no issue with their pre amps and has more output for headphones probably I skip changing my interface
Old 21st March 2017
  #7
Gear Maniac
 

I would get an interface with the cleanest pres you can. You can add almost any kind of analog color you want with plugins. Most of the ones on your list seem to qualify. The Scarlett pres have a certain color to my ear which is actually surprisingly pleasing but at the same time, could limit how well some of the preamp saturation plugins will work later on. But, the focusrite pres do sound pretty good, especially for the price they are had for, so if you don't want to go down the esoteric rabbit hole of preamp coloration, they are an excellent value.
Old 21st March 2017
  #8
Gear Nut
 

consider something from the roland 'capture' series as well.

They use the good VS preamps which are nice.

Studio capture user here, but the smaller models have the same pre's.
Old 21st March 2017
  #9
Lives for gear
 
TurboJets's Avatar
Personally I like the Audient pre's over the Scarlett pre's. The Audient pre's have a more open feel while retaining more focus, if that makes any sense. The sound is more solid, like a quality console and when I say quality I mean they are very close to a large format Otari console. There is a bit more clarity and detail in the Audient box and the 1/4" phone jack inputs do not seem to color the signal like they do on Scarlett boxes.

Also, the JFET DI feature on the Audient box is fantastic IMO. No impedence matching problems that I've experienced so far and its a quality JFET DI.

The drivers are solid and I've had no problems in Win7 or Win10. I use an iD14 on a Win7 machine and a Win10 machine.
Old 21st March 2017
  #10
Gear Maniac
 

It's worth pointing out the audient is twice the price as a similarly featured focusrite.
Old 21st March 2017
  #11
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ikamy View Post
I want to be able record vocals in a reasonable volume without noise and use headphone for mixing (not in low volume)
Recording a vocal isn't really a challenge for modern gear (even if it's inexpensive), assuming whatever is upstream in the signal chain has decent performance in terms of signal to noise, and self noise. Where things get a little more tricky is recording sources with a lower SPL such as a (lightly) finger picked acoustic guitar. That's when noise becomes more of a concern. In order to do that without a lot of noise you need a condenser with low self noise and decent sensitivity, a preamp with a high signal to noise ratio, and an analog to digital converter with a high signal to noise ratio (where in the case of an audio interface, the latter of the two are integrated).

You can look at specs but... rarely do they tell the whole story because most manufacturers intentionally leave out details. Here is a great reference for the proper way to list a specification:

Audio Specifications

If you're just recording vocals, I suspect you'd get decent results from any of those boxes. As other have mentioned, look at the features with regards to inputs/outputs, etc. Latency might be something you want to look at as well. If you're recording low SPL sources, then you need to be a little more discriminating. Unfortunately in that case it gets hard to make comparison based on specs as many manufacturers leave things out, and there are other questions to ask as well which are rarely ever answered. How much gain the mic pre provides is usually easily found BUT... a signal to noise ratio at minimum gain and maximum gain... good luck finding that. Your best bet there is to get your hands on an actual box and try it out. The next best bet is probably to seek feedback from multiple people who own the box in question who are using it with your specific application in mind.

One box you may want to consider if you have a Mac or a PC with a Thunderbolt port is the Focusrite Clarrett 2Pre. It's just within your budget at $399. The preamps have an "air" mode which you might find nice for certain sources. It's an analog emulation of the transformer circuit in the Focusrite ISA pres, although there are no transformers in this pre. The first thing it does is lower the input impedance from 6200 Ohms down to 2100 Ohms and then there's also some EQ in there. To see what the EQ was doing I ran it through FuzzMeasure. The curve starts at 100 Hz (0 dB gain) and by the time you hit 10 kHz you have 4 dB of boost. Interestingly enough I've seen a few reviewers say things like "I'd probably leave it in air mode all the time". I don't really agree with that sentiment, especially if you're using an already bright mic like a C12 or an AKG 414 XLII, but it is a really nice feature to have. I have a pair of Rode NTRs which I think will be a perfect match for the Air feature on certain sources (can't wait to try that combo on vocals).

I own both the Clarrett 8PreX and the Clarrett Octopre. Nice boxes for the $$$. The line input has gobs of headroom. Where they save some money is in the output stages. I measured a +4 dBu output at -14 dBFS which makes perfect sense as Focusrite's published spec for the max output is +18 dBu. Ideally I'd like to see an output of +22 or +24 dBu which would put a +4 dBu output at -18 or -20 dBFS respectively but for home recording, this is not a deal-breaker (IMO). In terms of places to cut costs, that was the right decision. In the few pres I checked on your list of 5, they all seemed to make the same compromise.

The pres on the Clarrett provide 57 dB of gain.

I took a quick look at the specs of the various interfaces listed. Even though none of them had properly listed specs, it looks like the least capable of the lot was the Komplete Audio, and Behringer boxes. I could find specs (like absolutely nothing) for the Steinberg box although it has some interesting features. My choice of those five, without listening and based on what little there is in terms of published specs would be the Audient followed by the Focusrite Scarlett.

Between those two... the Scarlett offers 50 dB of gain on the mic pre, and the Audient offers 58. That's a pretty significant different. My question there would be... how much noise is there at max gain? Neither companies publish that specification. While the Audient provides 8 dB more of gain... if its noise floor is 8 dB higher than the Focusrite's, then it's not a terribly useful 8 dB of gain. For the record, the Clarrett offers 57 dB of gain.

So what else... now that I've thrown the Clarrett into the mix, does that make sense? Well... you mentioned your budget for a mic is something under $300. It might make a lot more sense to spend $400 on a mic and $300 on an interface instead of $400 on an interface and $300 on a mic but there are a TON of variables there. One final mention about the Clarrett, it will have the lowest latency of the entire bunch if you're monitoring through your DAW. Otherwise, each manufacturer has a usable workaround for dealing with latency that bypasses the DAW's monitoring.

As far as mics go... if you're handy with a soldering iron I'd highly recommend Microphone-Parts S87 kit. It's a cardiod large diaphragm. I built it's multi-pattern counterpart the S3-87 and it offers a really tremendous bang for the buck. Super quiet, very sensitive, great components, sounds great, blah blah. At $349 it's a little beyond your budget but if you go for a less expensive interface that might work. Another consideration would be 3U Audio. I'm not familiar with them but they have a rather enthusiastic following so they're worth considering.
Old 21st March 2017
  #12
Gear Maniac
 

A mic that's been getting a lot of attention in your price range is the Aston origin. At least worth a look and they can be found in some retail environments to test.

Personally, I'm super cautious when it comes to mics and prefer to stick to the "name" brands if I'm going to bother spending more than $3-400. I'd rather get something decent to learn with, and save for a serious upgrade later.

There is a lot of enthusiasm from the kit builders and 3U out there for sure though.
Old 21st March 2017
  #13
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by shewhorn View Post
Recording a vocal isn't really a challenge for modern gear (even if it's inexpensive), assuming whatever is upstream in the signal chain has decent performance in terms of signal to noise, and self noise. Where things get a little more tricky is recording sources with a lower SPL such as a (lightly) finger picked acoustic guitar. That's when noise becomes more of a concern. In order to do that without a lot of noise you need a condenser with low self noise and decent sensitivity, a preamp with a high signal to noise ratio, and an analog to digital converter with a high signal to noise ratio (where in the case of an audio interface, the latter of the two are integrated).

You can look at specs but... rarely do they tell the whole story because most manufacturers intentionally leave out details. Here is a great reference for the proper way to list a specification:

Audio Specifications

If you're just recording vocals, I suspect you'd get decent results from any of those boxes. As other have mentioned, look at the features with regards to inputs/outputs, etc. Latency might be something you want to look at as well. If you're recording low SPL sources, then you need to be a little more discriminating. Unfortunately in that case it gets hard to make comparison based on specs as many manufacturers leave things out, and there are other questions to ask as well which are rarely ever answered. How much gain the mic pre provides is usually easily found BUT... a signal to noise ratio at minimum gain and maximum gain... good luck finding that. Your best bet there is to get your hands on an actual box and try it out. The next best bet is probably to seek feedback from multiple people who own the box in question who are using it with your specific application in mind.

One box you may want to consider if you have a Mac or a PC with a Thunderbolt port is the Focusrite Clarrett 2Pre. It's just within your budget at $399. The preamps have an "air" mode which you might find nice for certain sources. It's an analog emulation of the transformer circuit in the Focusrite ISA pres, although there are no transformers in this pre. The first thing it does is lower the input impedance from 6200 Ohms down to 2100 Ohms and then there's also some EQ in there. To see what the EQ was doing I ran it through FuzzMeasure. The curve starts at 100 Hz (0 dB gain) and by the time you hit 10 kHz you have 4 dB of boost. Interestingly enough I've seen a few reviewers say things like "I'd probably leave it in air mode all the time". I don't really agree with that sentiment, especially if you're using an already bright mic like a C12 or an AKG 414 XLII, but it is a really nice feature to have. I have a pair of Rode NTRs which I think will be a perfect match for the Air feature on certain sources (can't wait to try that combo on vocals).

I own both the Clarrett 8PreX and the Clarrett Octopre. Nice boxes for the $$$. The line input has gobs of headroom. Where they save some money is in the output stages. I measured a +4 dBu output at -14 dBFS which makes perfect sense as Focusrite's published spec for the max output is +18 dBu. Ideally I'd like to see an output of +22 or +24 dBu which would put a +4 dBu output at -18 or -20 dBFS respectively but for home recording, this is not a deal-breaker (IMO). In terms of places to cut costs, that was the right decision. In the few pres I checked on your list of 5, they all seemed to make the same compromise.

The pres on the Clarrett provide 57 dB of gain.

I took a quick look at the specs of the various interfaces listed. Even though none of them had properly listed specs, it looks like the least capable of the lot was the Komplete Audio, and Behringer boxes. I could find specs (like absolutely nothing) for the Steinberg box although it has some interesting features. My choice of those five, without listening and based on what little there is in terms of published specs would be the Audient followed by the Focusrite Scarlett.

Between those two... the Scarlett offers 50 dB of gain on the mic pre, and the Audient offers 58. That's a pretty significant different. My question there would be... how much noise is there at max gain? Neither companies publish that specification. While the Audient provides 8 dB more of gain... if its noise floor is 8 dB higher than the Focusrite's, then it's not a terribly useful 8 dB of gain. For the record, the Clarrett offers 57 dB of gain.

So what else... now that I've thrown the Clarrett into the mix, does that make sense? Well... you mentioned your budget for a mic is something under $300. It might make a lot more sense to spend $400 on a mic and $300 on an interface instead of $400 on an interface and $300 on a mic but there are a TON of variables there. One final mention about the Clarrett, it will have the lowest latency of the entire bunch if you're monitoring through your DAW. Otherwise, each manufacturer has a usable workaround for dealing with latency that bypasses the DAW's monitoring.

As far as mics go... if you're handy with a soldering iron I'd highly recommend Microphone-Parts S87 kit. It's a cardiod large diaphragm. I built it's multi-pattern counterpart the S3-87 and it offers a really tremendous bang for the buck. Super quiet, very sensitive, great components, sounds great, blah blah. At $349 it's a little beyond your budget but if you go for a less expensive interface that might work. Another consideration would be 3U Audio. I'm not familiar with them but they have a rather enthusiastic following so they're worth considering.
Re the Clarett, if they don't have transformers they need to let their reps know. I was told they do! A good argument for having inside reps vs using a firm if true.
Old 21st March 2017
  #14
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicornsfyeah View Post
Re the Clarett, if they don't have transformers they need to let their reps know. I was told they do! A good argument for having inside reps vs using a firm if true.
You need to call Focusrite and tell them that one of their reps is misrepresenting the product (seriously). An "analog model" does not equate to a transformer anymore than a plugin does (that said, it's still a nice sounding circuit... or at least, I personally find it useful on some things). Directly from Focusrite's own mouth:

https://us.focusrite.com/mic-pres/clarett-octopre

The mic pres have been designed specifically for the Clarett range, with plenty of gain, yet low noise and distortion - and great sound quality. They include a special “Air” feature that switches in an analogue model of the classic transformer-based Focusrite ISA mic pre, switching the impedance of the preamp to that of the original ISA, and enabling a ‘transformer resonance effect’, giving your microphone recordings the air and clarity of an ISA transformer-based mic pre recording. In addition, the mic pres have plenty of headroom and are ideal for recording drums and other extreme level sources.

Also... given that the 8PreX retails for under $1000 and the Octopre for under $700 (and I paid a lot less for mine), having worked for a few pro audio companies (and knowing how component costs can affect MSRP), my BS meter would have had me had me handing said rep a screwdriver and saying "prove it". Certainly not impossible if you use a really crappy transformer, but with that feature set, and at that price point... maintaining a separate transformerless circuit and a separate circuit with a transformer is something that would surprise me.
Old 21st March 2017
  #15
Gear Head
 

Also, it's far more likely that Focusrite did very clearly explain the feature set, and that it's the rep that got it wrong, or didn't understand what was explained to them.
Old 22nd March 2017
  #16
Gear Maniac
 
ikamy's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Wow, Thank you all it takes long to digest all these information , in this price range can I get something with 2 headphone outputs ?
I feel Im so stupid right now ,
Old 22nd March 2017
  #17
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ikamy View Post
Wow, Thank you all it takes long to digest all these information , in this price range can I get something with 2 headphone outputs ?
I feel Im so stupid right now ,
Focusrite Scarlett 18i8 @$349
Focusrite Scarlett 6i6 @$249
MAudio Track 8 @$399
Behring U-Phoria UMC 1820 @$299

I'm sure there's more out there but yes, you have options.
Old 22nd March 2017
  #18
Gear Maniac
 

This rep is a new hire and I did ask him three times as I found it a bit unbelievable. I think the confusion might come from the fact that some ISA preamps which use a transformer, also have an "air" setting.
Old 22nd March 2017
  #19
Gear Maniac
 
ikamy's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by shewhorn View Post
Recording a vocal isn't really a challenge for modern gear (even if it's inexpensive), assuming whatever is upstream in the signal chain has decent performance in terms of signal to noise, and self noise. Where things get a little more tricky is recording sources with a lower SPL such as a (lightly) finger picked acoustic guitar. That's when noise becomes more of a concern. In order to do that without a lot of noise you need a condenser with low self noise and decent sensitivity, a preamp with a high signal to noise ratio, and an analog to digital converter with a high signal to noise ratio (where in the case of an audio interface, the latter of the two are integrated).

You can look at specs but... rarely do they tell the whole story because most manufacturers intentionally leave out details. Here is a great reference for the proper way to list a specification:

Audio Specifications

If you're just recording vocals, I suspect you'd get decent results from any of those boxes. As other have mentioned, look at the features with regards to inputs/outputs, etc. Latency might be something you want to look at as well. If you're recording low SPL sources, then you need to be a little more discriminating. Unfortunately in that case it gets hard to make comparison based on specs as many manufacturers leave things out, and there are other questions to ask as well which are rarely ever answered. How much gain the mic pre provides is usually easily found BUT... a signal to noise ratio at minimum gain and maximum gain... good luck finding that. Your best bet there is to get your hands on an actual box and try it out. The next best bet is probably to seek feedback from multiple people who own the box in question who are using it with your specific application in mind.

One box you may want to consider if you have a Mac or a PC with a Thunderbolt port is the Focusrite Clarrett 2Pre. It's just within your budget at $399. The preamps have an "air" mode which you might find nice for certain sources. It's an analog emulation of the transformer circuit in the Focusrite ISA pres, although there are no transformers in this pre. The first thing it does is lower the input impedance from 6200 Ohms down to 2100 Ohms and then there's also some EQ in there. To see what the EQ was doing I ran it through FuzzMeasure. The curve starts at 100 Hz (0 dB gain) and by the time you hit 10 kHz you have 4 dB of boost. Interestingly enough I've seen a few reviewers say things like "I'd probably leave it in air mode all the time". I don't really agree with that sentiment, especially if you're using an already bright mic like a C12 or an AKG 414 XLII, but it is a really nice feature to have. I have a pair of Rode NTRs which I think will be a perfect match for the Air feature on certain sources (can't wait to try that combo on vocals).

I own both the Clarrett 8PreX and the Clarrett Octopre. Nice boxes for the $$$. The line input has gobs of headroom. Where they save some money is in the output stages. I measured a +4 dBu output at -14 dBFS which makes perfect sense as Focusrite's published spec for the max output is +18 dBu. Ideally I'd like to see an output of +22 or +24 dBu which would put a +4 dBu output at -18 or -20 dBFS respectively but for home recording, this is not a deal-breaker (IMO). In terms of places to cut costs, that was the right decision. In the few pres I checked on your list of 5, they all seemed to make the same compromise.

The pres on the Clarrett provide 57 dB of gain.

I took a quick look at the specs of the various interfaces listed. Even though none of them had properly listed specs, it looks like the least capable of the lot was the Komplete Audio, and Behringer boxes. I could find specs (like absolutely nothing) for the Steinberg box although it has some interesting features. My choice of those five, without listening and based on what little there is in terms of published specs would be the Audient followed by the Focusrite Scarlett.

Between those two... the Scarlett offers 50 dB of gain on the mic pre, and the Audient offers 58. That's a pretty significant different. My question there would be... how much noise is there at max gain? Neither companies publish that specification. While the Audient provides 8 dB more of gain... if its noise floor is 8 dB higher than the Focusrite's, then it's not a terribly useful 8 dB of gain. For the record, the Clarrett offers 57 dB of gain.

So what else... now that I've thrown the Clarrett into the mix, does that make sense? Well... you mentioned your budget for a mic is something under $300. It might make a lot more sense to spend $400 on a mic and $300 on an interface instead of $400 on an interface and $300 on a mic but there are a TON of variables there. One final mention about the Clarrett, it will have the lowest latency of the entire bunch if you're monitoring through your DAW. Otherwise, each manufacturer has a usable workaround for dealing with latency that bypasses the DAW's monitoring.

As far as mics go... if you're handy with a soldering iron I'd highly recommend Microphone-Parts S87 kit. It's a cardiod large diaphragm. I built it's multi-pattern counterpart the S3-87 and it offers a really tremendous bang for the buck. Super quiet, very sensitive, great components, sounds great, blah blah. At $349 it's a little beyond your budget but if you go for a less expensive interface that might work. Another consideration would be 3U Audio. I'm not familiar with them but they have a rather enthusiastic following so they're worth considering.
The interface you mentioned is pretty amazing but it seems it is just for MAC ??

Also If I dont have thunderbolt port do you recommend it ? (I have USB, USB 3, Firewire)
Old 22nd March 2017
  #20
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ikamy View Post
The interface you mentioned is pretty amazing but it seems it is just for MAC ??

Also If I dont have thunderbolt port do you recommend it ? (I have USB, USB 3, Firewire)
If you can add thunderbolt to your machine do it yesterday. With a quad core they let you run it like it's practically analog. Even with a dual core I'd bet you could reduce latency 30-50%.
Old 22nd March 2017
  #21
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ikamy View Post
The interface you mentioned is pretty amazing but it seems it is just for MAC ??

Also If I dont have thunderbolt port do you recommend it ? (I have USB, USB 3, Firewire)
The Clarett 2Pre is compatible with Windows 8.1 and Window 10 according to Focusrite's compatibility checker. As for adding Thunderbolt... meh... it depends upon what you're doing. If you're working with a budget it wouldn't be high on my priority list. I'd pay more attention to the latency of the USB and Firewire offerings. If you run into a latency issue, all of the manufacturers provide tools that can mitigate that. It may not be the perfect headphone mix for overdubs, but it'll are workable. So, there are workarounds for that. Your microphone though, that's the beginning of your signal chain, and I'd argue, one of the most important if not the most important part of it as well.

If you buy the right mic... you will have it for years to come. Audio interfaces come and go as technology changes and gets better but mics, mics tend to stick around (and accumulate).
Old 22nd March 2017
  #22
Here for the gear
 
c0nan's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicornsfyeah View Post
It's worth pointing out the audient is twice the price as a similarly featured focusrite.
The focusrite neither has a JFET D.I. nor does it offer digital connections.
Old 22nd March 2017
  #23
Lives for gear
 
audientworld's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by c0nan View Post
My vote goes to Audient, since they use the design of their console preamps for their whole range (not sure about the ID4). I got the ID14 myself and am more than happy with it. If 2 inputs (+ digital option) are enough you definitely should give it a try.
Hi All,

The iD4 has exactly the same preamp as our ASP8024 Heritage Edition console. With our entire range of interfaces you are getting the same genuine class A console preamp. We have taken everything we have learnt from designing and manufacturing in line analogue recording consoles and packed it into a small affordable box.

If you have any questions about the iD14 please do not hesitate to get in touch and we will be more than happy to help you out!

Have a great day!

Ryan @ Audient Tech Support
Old 22nd March 2017
  #24
Gear Maniac
 

I love how when manufacturers pop up here it's usually just to be informative and helpful!

As for my enthusiasm for thunderbolt, I can't say how well adding it to a windows machine will work out, or what card you should get but, I can say it's extremely liberating to be able to monitor thorough your daw with no perceivable latency and creatively inspiring too.

As for the benefit vs the OPs current budget, er yeah, your money may be better spent on other considerations at the moment. But damn thunderbolt is awesome.
Old 22nd March 2017
  #25
Gear Addict
 

Audient.
Old 22nd March 2017
  #26
Gear Maniac
 
ikamy's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by audientworld View Post
Hi All,

The iD4 has exactly the same preamp as our ASP8024 Heritage Edition console. With our entire range of interfaces you are getting the same genuine class A console preamp. We have taken everything we have learnt from designing and manufacturing in line analogue recording consoles and packed it into a small affordable box.

If you have any questions about the iD14 please do not hesitate to get in touch and we will be more than happy to help you out!

Have a great day!

Ryan @ Audient Tech Support
Thank you, I need 2 headphone outputs
Any other model? Or any other solution with this model??

Also Im gonna add a SUB woofer to my setup pretty soon, not sure To be able to have more than a pair of monitors with ID 14
Old 22nd March 2017
  #27
Gear Maniac
 
ikamy's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicornsfyeah View Post
I love how when manufacturers pop up here it's usually just to be informative and helpful!

As for my enthusiasm for thunderbolt, I can't say how well adding it to a windows machine will work out, or what card you should get but, I can say it's extremely liberating to be able to monitor thorough your daw with no perceivable latency and creatively inspiring too.

As for the benefit vs the OPs current budget, er yeah, your money may be better spent on other considerations at the moment. But damn thunderbolt is awesome.
Thunderbolt is so tempting, I like to upgrade my whole setup, but till the next summer I should work with this setup and this budget

I also have USB 3, Im not sure but nobody suggest anything compatible with USB 3
Old 22nd March 2017
  #28
Gear Maniac
 

I'm not aware of too many USB 3 right now that are truely affordable. There are some smaller companies making interfaces now, so if you do some digging you may find one. The only one I can think of off the top of my head is the UA twin USB. This would allow you to use plugins on your input with next to no latency but you might have to record the output of the plugin when you do it, meaning you would be stuck with the settings you chose while tracking. They updated their driver so you can record the dry signal and monitor the plugins in the thunderbolt ones I think, but I'm not informed at the moment if the USB twin has enough bandwidth to do that. Those twins aren't exactly affordable for a lot of people though, and you have to pay extra for their plugins if you want add more which will obviously increase the cost further.

As for your headphone issue, if you just need two headphones for tracking, you can add a headphone distributor to any interface for as low as ~$25, these won't have as good fidelity as the built in headphone amps in most brands interfaces but it gets the job done.
Old 22nd March 2017
  #29
Lives for gear
 

I've used all of them.

The audient gets my money

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Old 23rd March 2017
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ikamy View Post
Thank you, I need 2 headphone outputs
Any other model? Or any other solution with this model??

Also Im gonna add a SUB woofer to my setup pretty soon, not sure To be able to have more than a pair of monitors with ID 14
Hey,

Currently the only interface we make with two headphone outputs is the iD4. However you can get very inexpensive headphone splitters which would allow you to use two pairs of headphones with the iD14. However you would not be able to control these outputs independently, much like the iD4.

In regards to connecting a sub and stereo monitors to your iD14. Many subs on the market have both inputs and outputs. This means that you would connect the left and right outputs of your iD14 to the respective inputs of your sub and then connect the outputs of your sub to the inputs of your monitor.

The signal chain would be as such:

outputs (iD14) > Inputs (sub) > outputs (sub) > Inputs (monitors)
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