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Midi Keyboard and Using it for Learning Purpose
Old 29th June 2016
  #1
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Thread Starter
Midi Keyboard and Using it for Learning Purpose

Hey.

Do you think that midi keyboards is OK enough to learn entry level playing piano?

I am wondering general thoughts on this, would you share your opinions?

If so, can you suggest some midi keyboards that the level of 100$ ?

Thank you.

edit: The main reason i want to buy a midi keyboard is creating drums on DAWs so learning piano is my second purpose, for now.
Old 21st July 2016
  #2
Gear Addict
Any cheap keyboard will be fine for programming beats.

For learning to play the piano, I'd definitely recommend a somewhat better keyboard with weighted keys (or even hammer action), as they feel totally different from non weighted synth keys.
Old 21st July 2016
  #3
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Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elmbeatz View Post
Any cheap keyboard will be fine for programming beats.

For learning to play the piano, I'd definitely recommend a somewhat better keyboard with weighted keys (or even hammer action), as they feel totally different from non weighted synth keys.

Which model do you suggest that include hammer action?
Old 21st July 2016
  #4
Gear Addict
I have a Doepfer LMK4+
These are pretty expesive though.

I have no clue where prices start for a good hammer-weighted keyboard.
Old 21st July 2016
  #5
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Thread Starter
Thank you.
Old 25th July 2016
  #6
You can learn the fundamentals of music on a 25 key midi controller. Its the same as a piano, everything just repeats. There are really only 12 notes from any note to its octave (the same note twice as high in pitch)

A C major scale on a midi controller keyboard is played the same way on a grand piano. Same with any chord, interval or bass line.

Since learning piano is secondary, I would get a 25 key midi controller. You can use it for drum samples, piano, synth, bass and a bunch of other stuff. You can also learn piano scales and chords. Weighted keys feel better to a piano player but if you are not aspiring to be a pianist then skip the weighted keys. You'll get more for your money.
Old 28th July 2016
  #7
Gear Addict
Unless you have only very limited space available, I really disadvice anyone from getting a 25 Key controller. True, you can use such things for programming and controlling stuff. But in terms of *playing* stuff, these things really suck hard. Sucking starts if you simply wanna play a bassline with your left hand down in the second octave and a chord progression in the fourth with your right hand.

I'd recommend at least 61 keys. Don't worry too much about the weighted keys thing - you can get these later, if you want.
Old 28th July 2016
  #8
Here for the gear
get at least a 4 octave keyboard

of course it would work. But for the "piano learning" part of your objective, you want to get at least a 4 octave keyboard. 49 keys, I think that is.

Last year I bought the Alesis Q49 midi controller keyboard, for only $ 80. It works pretty well, altough I can imagine more expensive keyboards having far more "realistic" key action.

I've been able to practice two-hand playing and it's working great. so, yes: get any midi controller keyboard, provided it has "sensitivity" and at least a 4 octave range.
Old 28th July 2016
  #9
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uncle duncan's Avatar
 

Most drum VIs and drum sound modules require a 5-octave keyboard to access all the sounds. It's true that you can access the basic sounds - kick snare, hats, cymbals and toms with a 25-note keyboard, but if you want to get creative, (shakers, bells, percussion instruments) you'll either need more keys or you'll need to keep flipping the transpose button up and down.

On learning piano, any $100 keyboard with weighted action should be fine. Play it in the store and notice how quickly the piano keys bounce back after you play a note. Some keyboards are sluggish, others are fast. If you're going to be playing drum fills, you'll need a fast keyboard, not a sluggish one. Another thing to be aware of is velocity response. On some cheap keyboards, the black notes play louder than the white notes. This will create problems, whether you're programming drums or piano parts.

On learning piano, try to incorporate the Nashville Numbers System into your studies. It clarifies music theory, making it much easier to understand melody and song structure.
Old 1 week ago
  #10
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tabache's Avatar
 

Midi keyboard for learning piano

Hi, I have the same problem. A midi-keyboard for learning piano.
I need to buy a midi keyboard with:
- at least 4 octave
- a midi output.
- Not too heavy because I have to carry it a lot around.

I've buyed an mKeyB 49C. It is a very cheap keyboard, but the keys are too hard. And not all the keys have the same weight.


Today I noticed these keyboard, but I have no idea which of these have the best keys.


M-Audio Keystation 49

Roland A-49

Alesis Q49

Roland A500S

Swissonic EasyKey 61
(I think too heavy keyboard for me, 6 KG)


Someone could compare them? Or have other proposals?
Old 1 week ago
  #11
Gear Guru
 
kafka's Avatar
For working out drum parts, don't use a keyboard controller. Get something like an Akai MPD. You'll find 8 pads to be pretty limiting. One of the 16 pad controllers would be more useful.

If you want to learn to play keyboards with two hands, a minimum of 49 keys, but 61 is preferable. I have the 49 key Novation Impulse, and I got the 61 key for my son because I liked it. If you just need to learn some fingerings and work out some chords, 37 keys is really the minimum. I have an old 25 key, and it's just not enough space for working anything out for real. I just picked up a 37 key IK Multimedia iRig Pro for about $100, and it's fine for sitting out on the deck and working out horn parts and chord voicings.

To be honest, the quality of all of these budget keyboards is decent enough, given what you're paying, and none of them suck. You can usually find them used pretty cheap, and they're often in good condition because people buy them and don't use them.
Old 1 week ago
  #12
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tabache's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kafka View Post
For working out drum parts, don't use a keyboard controller. Get something like an Akai MPD. You'll find 8 pads to be pretty limiting. One of the 16 pad controllers would be more useful.

If you want to learn to play keyboards with two hands, a minimum of 49 keys, but 61 is preferable. I have the 49 key Novation Impulse, and I got the 61 key for my son because I liked it. If you just need to learn some fingerings and work out some chords, 37 keys is really the minimum. I have an old 25 key, and it's just not enough space for working anything out for real. I just picked up a 37 key IK Multimedia iRig Pro for about $100, and it's fine for sitting out on the deck and working out horn parts and chord voicings.

To be honest, the quality of all of these budget keyboards is decent enough, given what you're paying, and none of them suck. You can usually find them used pretty cheap, and they're often in good condition because people buy them and don't use them.
Hi kafka,
I want to learn to play keyboards with two hands.
I've read that the keys quality pressing in M-Audio and in Alesis is not too good.
So I'm trying to understand which can be the keyboard that allows me good manual hands without spending too much.
Old 1 week ago
  #13
Gear Guru
 
kafka's Avatar
I have an older M-Audio Keystation 88. It's fine. Probably about as good as you could get in the budget range.

No matter what, it's not a piano. You can't really learn how to play piano for real on a keyboard. It's just not the same thing as mechanically producing the sound with your fingers. But you can learn how to operate a keyboard.
Old 1 week ago
  #14
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tabache's Avatar
 

thank you Kafka.

The fact is that I would like a keyboard that has good quality key in terms of pressure.

Because I do not want to just learn playing the piano, but also have a good feeling with it. Because I will have to play for so many hours every day with this keyboard.



So I'm wondering, for example, if a Roland is better than an Alesis...And I am willing to pay a little more.
Old 5 days ago
  #15
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norfolk martin's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tabache View Post
thank you Kafka.

The fact is that I would like a keyboard that has good quality key in terms of pressure.

Because I do not want to just learn playing the piano, but also have a good feeling with it. Because I will have to play for so many hours every day with this keyboard.



So I'm wondering, for example, if a Roland is better than an Alesis...And I am willing to pay a little more.


I think the question is whether you want to become primarily someone who plays acoustic piano, or a keyboard player. If you really want to become an acoustic player, the key weight and response are more important. Other rudiments such as reading and fingering technique can be learned as easily on a non-weighted keyboard. Further, a light keyboard will sometimes allow more practice time in a day than a heavier one, so there is a trade-off

I have an M-audio Keystation 88 pro, but find the weighted keys to be unrealistically heavy compared to every upright I've ever played. My problem is therefore the opposite - I had to get a smaller keyboard with light sprung keys to play some synth parts. When playing something that was originally played on a synth or organ, the weighted keys can feel as wrong as unweighted keys do on piano. I hate playing Hammond parts on the 88 pro
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