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Guerilla Drum Tuning
Old 15th January 2004
  #1
Gear Addict
 
mdbeh's Avatar
 

Guerilla Drum Tuning

I have an out-of-town gig in a few weeks. I like the band, and I like the drummer... good feel, good time, but CAN'T tune his drums. They sound, alternately, dead, floppy, just... bad.

Given the timeline, I should probably find someone else to do it, but that's going to be tricky because 1) it's away from my home base 2) it's a pretty low rent session, so even an assistant would be a luxury. And bringing someone in could be psychologically tricky, too.

So... fool's errand though it may be, I'm looking for some primers on basic drum tuning. I'm not expecting miracles, but in this case 'better than awful' would be a real improvement. It's something I should have learned years ago, really, but I just, ummm, haven't.

I'm going to bug some drummer friends this week, but I'm curious to hear from the GS as well.

Thanks in advance...
Old 15th January 2004
  #2
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
I hate to plug myself but I need to. I wrote this a few years ago on posted it on rec.audio.pro. After doing that someone from a home recording website asked me if they could repost it and I said go for it. I've lost track of the number of people that have told me that this worked wonders for them.

---------
Let me start by making a few disclaimers. #1 I'm not a drummer, I learned everything by watching and doing. #2 There is no "right" way to tune drums. There are guidelines you can and should follow, but to each his own. I'm going to approach this novel with the idea that the drummer will let you mangle his/her kit with brand new heads.

Let's start with the kit. You can make almost any kit sound great. The worst one i've ever recorded was a set of DW's. The drummer had a $2500 5 piece kit that wasn't tuned well, plus he put new heads on as soon as he came in, but i'll talk about that later. The next week a drummer came in with a set of Pearl Exports that recorded themselves. Why? Because he knew how to tune them. Having a good set is mandatory. Every major manufactor makes a decent set that's under a grand. You want something along the lines of a Tama Rockstar or a Premeir APK. The Mapex Mars kit's are also really good for the money. I prefer small drums to large drums. Small drums will actually sound deeper and bigger on tape. The main reason for this is that you can tune a small drum lower and keep tension on the head. A big drum tuned low will give you a "thunk" or have a nasty curve to it, almost like a really crazy vibrato. My prefrence is a 16x22 kick, 9x10, 10x12, and 12x14 toms and a 5x14 snare. This is a nice middle of the road kit that can be tuned well for a variety of rock, pop, metal and jazz sessions. A thinner, lighter shell will resonate more then a heavier thicker shell. Also, lighter hardware is better, but you don't want junk on there. The biggest thing that affects sustain is the amount of holes drilled in the shell and the quality of the hardware. The less the better and the cleaner the installation the better. Also, make sure the bearing edges (the edge of the plywood that the head sits on) are smooth.

Ok, let's talk about heads for a little bit. A thinner head like a Diplomat will have a higher fundamental pitch and longer sustain then a thicker head like an Ambassador. A coated head won't have the sustain of a clear head. A clear head will also give you more attack. A pinstripe is two heads put together, so obviously it'll have less sustain, and a lower pitch which makes them popular for live work. 6 out of 10 drummers will put clear Ambassadors on the top and bottom of their toms. The rest of the guys will use pinstripes or something similar.

Ok, now that we've picked our heads, let's put them on. We'll start with the first rack tom. Take the drum off the mount and place it on a flat surface like a tabletop or a floor with shag carpet. Take the old heads off and save them unless their really beat. If you have coated heads, you don't want to see through them. If you have clear heads, change them before they get cloudy. You want to change both the top and bottom heads. Even though you don't hit the bottom head they still wear out. After a few months, they stretch and dry out and you lose tone. The top head will affect the attack and the inital pitch. The bottom head will affect the overall pitch and sustain of the drum. Let's move on to the fun stuff.

Ok, take the bottom head (clear ambassador) and put it on the drum. There are three methods to tightining the lugs. #1 would be to tighten every other lug. #2 is to crank them in a star pattern. #3 is to tighten opposing lugs. Which ever way you choose, you want to keep the tension on the head even and make sure that there aren't any wrinkles. Take the head and crank it way past the point that you want it. This will stretch the head out and seat it against the bearing edge. You want to hear the head snap and crack a little bit. After it's cranked, hit it with your stick once and listen to the pitch. Now, push down on the center of the head and all around the edges. You'll hear it crack again and the pitch will drop. Congrats!!! You're strecthing the head out. Tune it up again and repeat the process 2-3 times. Now flip the drum over and repeat the process for the top head. Now that you have both heads strecthed tighter then a b-cup bra on Pamala Anderson, we'll attempt to tune the drum.

Now we get to the hard part. Flip the drum over to the bottom head. Loosen the lugs so that there's almost no tension on the head. Tune them up usuing one of the above methods. Bring the head up to a nice medium tension and lightly tap next to each lug with your drum key. Go around the drum and listen to the pitches. You want each lug to produce the same pitch. Loosen the lug and the pitch drops, make it tighter and the pitch goes up. Now that they're close, hit the drum and listen to the overall pitch. Is it even or does it bend? You want it to be even, if it bends the tension isn't right and you need to check the lugs again. Bring the drum to the pitch were it sustains naturally and dosen't sound choked. Every shell has a pitch that's it's happiest at. On DW kits they actually stamp each shell with the resonate pitch. Now that the bottom head is tuned, flip the drum over and start on the top head. Prep the top head in the same way as the bottom. If you want to hear the attack and the "smack" of the stick hitting the head, you want the top head loose. Usually the top head should be looser then the bottom. If you want less attack, crank the top head a little more. Now that you like the sound of the top head, pick the drum up off the table or floor and lay it on it's side. Hit the top head. Do you like what you hear? If you do then great!!! Move onward and tune the rest of the toms. If you don't like it, then try to figure out what you don't like before you start to play with things. Don't like the pitch? Go to the bottom head. Too little attack? Go to the top head. Play with it untill you like it.

Let's move onto the kick drum. I like to see a Powerstroke 3 on the beater side, but you can also use a clear Ambassador. I don't like pinstipes here, but you gotta pick what you like. A Powerstroke is really thick and dead so you get a nice low fundamental and very few overtones. I also like the Evens EQ3. The standard front head is a black ambassador with a 6-8" hole. The hole is best slightly off center, you'll get more tone that way. Put the heads on in the same way that you did with the toms. I like to hear a nice smack from the beater, not a heavy mental (g) click, but a smack. So I like the beater head really loose, just tight enough that the wrinkles are out. I like the front head loose too. If it's too tight then you'll get lots of sustain. You can always put a towel in the drum against the front head if you need to cut down on the sustain. Wrap it up and tape it in there to keep it from moving, but make sure it's barely resting on the head, you want to dampen it, not choke it.

Chris from Sound420.com adds: "I was taught that after you get the drum in tune with itself, have the drummer (the drummer should just play the kick drum, not the rest of the set)and bass player play a song together, Listen to the bass guitar and the kick drum. If the kick drum is out of tune with the bass you will be able to hear some of the "overtones" that you were talking about in your article. I have had the bass drum so out of tune with the bass on live gigs to the point that everybody in the band thought the bass player was out of tune. Usually the bass player checks the tuning after every song and can never figure out why he is getting all those looks from the rest of the band... it's because the kick drum is causing an overtone on the whole low end of the spectrum, making the bass sound "warbled" or out of tune. It is enough to drive musicians and sound engineers mad! I've heard that at a lot of rock shows. Anyway, with a lot of practice, you will be able to pick this up and tell the drummer "tighten all the tuners a quarter turn", or "loosen up the head a tiny bit.." depending on how far off the kick drum and bass are."

***Snare... Oh boy, here's a can of worms. Everyone like's a diffrent snare sound. I like to hear a nice crack. How do you get it? Let's start by putting the heads on with our favorite method. Use a snare side bottom head. This is the one time that you want a really thin head. The standard top head is a coated ambassador. Remove the snare from the bottom of the drum. Tune the bottom head to a medium pitch and make sure it's even the whole way around. Now we'll go to the top head. If you want a nice crack, crank it up!!! The tighter the head is, the more crack your going to get. The rule of thumb here is to keep the top and bottom heads close to each other pitch wise. The snare should be tight, but not choked. If the snare has any broken strands or it's twisted or pulled, just replace it.

Congratulations!!! You've just tuned a drum kit. I can go into a lttle more detail if anyody want's me to, but this should be a good starting point. Remember, practice makes perfect, especially with tuning drums. The more you do it, the better you'll get.
Old 15th January 2004
  #3
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
***Recent additon...since I wrote that I've learned that I like the bottom head on the snare to be tuned pretty damn tight. It seems to help snare response with ghost notes and also gives the drum a higher pitch. The tension between the lugs on the bottom doesn't matter and to be honest...shouldn't be all that even but they should be close. If it is even you'll probably find that one of the toms makes the snares rattle like a muther. Usually it's the first rack tom but it can vary. If that's the case try tuning the bottom head on the snare up or down a bit. In all cases remember that 1/8 to 1/4 turn on each lug will drasticly affect the tuning of the drum by as much as a step and a half. I hate seeing drummers tune their toms by cranking one tension rod by 1-2 turns in an attempt to "tune" their tubs. That doesn't work.
Old 15th January 2004
  #4
Gear Maniac
 
scotty-o's Avatar
 

Some great tips there, Jay!

Hey Brian, one thing that I use that has really helped me tune drums is this: www.drumdial.com
I never really learned how to tune drums, but the more I was recording local bands, the more I needed to do something for these guys' drum kits
The dial thing lets me buzz around the kit and get things in the ballpark pretty quickly, as long as the heads aren't roached. From there I'll tweak it by ear.

FWIW
-Scotty
Old 15th January 2004
  #5
JB3
Gear Addict
 

Drum Tuning

If you would like to get a little further into the subject, Bob Gatzen made a pretty good video on Drum Tuning on DCI Music Videos (95 min run time) a couple years ago...I think Guitar Center and others keep it in stock...had some pretty good info from theory and construction through basic tuning...

...JB3
Old 15th January 2004
  #6
Gear Addict
 
Gulliver's Avatar
That's great tuning advice Jay, and will probably solve the problem on the mbdeh guy's kit..... The Bob Gatzen video is also good. There's also TONS of great info here Drum Tuning Bible ...you might just send the link to every drummer you know!

Good luck, great thread......
Old 15th January 2004
  #7
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
I have a variation to Jay's suggestion of giving 'CPR' to the new heads. I put the drum on carpet and stand on it and bounce on my toes. It really married the head to the barring edge.

Where's your session. If you're staying in Illinois but going south I might be able to come by and tune the drums for ya.
Old 15th January 2004
  #8
Gear Addict
 
mdbeh's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally posted by Drumsound
Where's your session. If you're staying in Illinois but going south I might be able to come by and tune the drums for ya.
Detroit, unfortunately. Thanks for the offer, though.
Old 15th January 2004
  #9
Gear Addict
 
mdbeh's Avatar
 

Thanks to Jay et al for the suggestions--they're exactly the sort of thing I was looking for.

I'll let y'all know how it turns out.
Old 16th January 2004
  #10
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
Quote:
Originally posted by Drumsound
I have a variation to Jay's suggestion of giving 'CPR' to the new heads. I put the drum on carpet and stand on it and bounce on my toes. It really married the head to the barring edge.
And if you have a bad head which decides to seperate from the hoop you'll go crashing through the drum and possibly kill the bearing edge or at least scuff the inside of it. I'd rather use my elbow.
Old 16th January 2004
  #11
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally posted by Jay Kahrs
And if you have a bad head which decides to seperate from the hoop you'll go crashing through the drum and possibly kill the bearing edge or at least scuff the inside of it. I'd rather use my elbow.
I've been doing it for YEARS with no problems. Of course I'm light. If I was Slippy's size, there's no way I'd do it.tutt

Any good head (Remo, Evans, Aquarian) should have no problem at all.

Jay,

I have to commend you. that's great inf, and coming from a guitarist it's amazing. Kudos
Old 16th January 2004
  #12
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
Quote:
Originally posted by Drumsound
I've been doing it for YEARS with no problems. Of course I'm light. If I was Slippy's size, there's no way I'd do it.tutt

Any good head (Remo, Evans, Aquarian) should have no problem at all.
Maybe. I've had a few Ambassador's blow out on me when I was cranking them on a snare. Granted if that happens the head was defective to begin with and probably would've died after a very short time on the drum. Still, I'd rather not take the chance. I'm 6 foot and about 200...fall down go boom LMBO

To be honest these days I'm not using Ambassador's anymore unless someone insist's on it. I've had much better luck with the Aqurian Satin Texture Coated's. They're more consistently pitched (one 12" head sounds just like another), the coating is much thicker, rougher and more durable and overall they last for a really really long time but retain most of the Ambassador tone. I normally don't like Aquarian heads but I SWEAR by these and refuse to put anything else on the house kit.

Thanks for the props, I learned from 2-3 guys who are great drummers and basically annoyed the hell out of them when they were reskinning and tuning their kits. But, they asked me all kinds of guitar and amp questions so I guess it's all good.
Old 16th January 2004
  #13
Lives for gear
 
dave-G's Avatar
Great advice here already. Just to add a piece of gear to the equation--get one of these

http://www.tama.com/accessories/specs/tw100.html


-dave
Old 17th January 2004
  #14
SEB
Lives for gear
 

Yeah!

The tension-watch is a real good place to start. I learnt to tune drums with this item, and it`s very practical to use when you nedd OK results fast, or when you won`t have a chance to listen to the drums while you are tuning -during a live show or similar.

Another point is that a well build drums has a much wider "tuning-spot" than the cheaper sets. I once had a Mapex wich sounded nice at one pitch, while my current N&C kit is very useful in various pitches. Noble & Cooley snares are a perfect example on this!!
Old 18th January 2004
  #15
Lives for gear
 
hollywood_steve's Avatar
 


Chris from Sound420.com adds: "I was taught that after you get the drum in tune with itself, have the drummer (the drummer should just play the kick drum, not the rest of the set)and bass player play a song together, Listen to the bass guitar and the kick drum. If the kick drum is out of tune with the bass you will be able to hear some of the "overtones" that you were talking about in your article. I have had the bass drum so out of tune with the bass on live gigs to the point that everybody in the band thought the bass player was out of tune. Usually the bass player checks the tuning after every song and can never figure out why he is getting all those looks from the rest of the band... it's because the kick drum is causing an overtone on the whole low end of the spectrum, making the bass sound "warbled" or out of tune. It is enough to drive musicians and sound engineers mad! I've heard that at a lot of rock shows. Anyway, with a lot of practice, you will be able to pick this up and tell the drummer "tighten all the tuners a quarter turn", or "loosen up the head a tiny bit.." depending on how far off the kick drum and bass are."


Am I the only guy confused by this? As a bass player, I am familiar with the conflict that can exist between the kick and the bass amp; but how the hell do you tune a single note kick drum to a bass guitar - unless the bass player agrees to only play one note that night? I guess that you could just start with the open E string, but what happens when you play a song in F. a half step higher? Did I miss something here???

Personally, although I agree with almost everything Jay wrote, my goal with setting up the drums is to do away with ANY hint of a pitched tone to any of the drums. I want a percussive snap or thud (depending on the drum) with no trace of a pitched tone. With kick and snare its pretty easy to make them completely percussive, but those damn toms can be a bitch. I guess thats why I prefer minimalist kits with never more than one rack tom.
Old 18th January 2004
  #16
Gear Nut
 

This is great stuff you guys have inspired me to set up that old blue sparkel Rogers set collecting dust in the store room.
Im off to pick up new heads and see if they can locate some missing hardware.
Old 18th January 2004
  #17
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally posted by flame Linear
This is great stuff you guys have inspired me to set up that old blue sparkel Rogers set collecting dust in the store room.
Im off to pick up new heads and see if they can locate some missing hardware.
MMMMM Rodgers cghhh...heh
Old 18th January 2004
  #18
Gear Maniac
 
excellrec's Avatar
 

Quote:
Am I the only guy confused by this? As a bass player, I am familiar with the conflict that can exist between the kick and the bass amp; but how the hell do you tune a single note kick drum to a bass guitar - unless the bass player agrees to only play one note that night? I guess that you could just start with the open E string, but what happens when you play a song in F. a half step higher? Did I miss something here???
maybe it could be slightly off any note say 441hz for example, making uneven intervals. just a guess though, dont know much of that myself.
Old 19th January 2004
  #19
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
Quote:
Originally posted by hollywood_steve

Chris from Sound420.com adds: "I was taught that after you get the drum in tune with itself, have the drummer (the drummer should just play the kick drum, not the rest of the set)and bass player play a song together, Listen to the bass guitar and the kick drum. If the kick drum is out of tune with the bass you will be able to hear some of the "overtones" that you were talking about in your article. I have had the bass drum so out of tune with the bass on live gigs to the point that everybody in the band thought the bass player was out of tune. Usually the bass player checks the tuning after every song and can never figure out why he is getting all those looks from the rest of the band... it's because the kick drum is causing an overtone on the whole low end of the spectrum, making the bass sound "warbled" or out of tune.


Am I the only guy confused by this? As a bass player, I am familiar with the conflict that can exist between the kick and the bass amp; but how the hell do you tune a single note kick drum to a bass guitar - unless the bass player agrees to only play one note that night? I guess that you could just start with the open E string, but what happens when you play a song in F. a half step higher? Did I miss something here???
Yes and no. I've run into this kind of thing more often with closed kicks then stuff with a hole in the front head and a mic inside. With those kinds of kits it's more smack or thud, with a closed kick there's more of a note to the drum and yeah, sometimes it rubs against the bass. Though usually, I find more problems exist between the toms then anything else.
Old 20th January 2004
  #20
Gear Maniac
 
wurly's Avatar
 

New Drum Tuning Thingy @NAMM

I'll post proper info tomorrow after I find the literature, but I saw a drum tuning device at Namm that blew me away.

Throw away those tension meters kids, they never really worked anyways.

Basically this device is a very strong aircraft cable that goes around some special "clips" on the tuning lugs at the top and bottom of the drums such that tightening or loosening the cable loosens or tightens all of the lugs equally!!!They claim lug to lug accuracy of 1%.

I saw it and heard it and I'm a believer. This invention saves so much time that you can tune the whole kit in the time it takes to do one drum the old way. You can compare and contrast different tunings with unbelievable speed.

More info tomorrow.

slideguy wurly
Old 21st January 2004
  #21
Lives for gear
 
Sofa King's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally posted by Jay Kahrs
And if you have a bad head which decides to seperate from the hoop you'll go crashing through the drum and possibly kill the bearing edge or at least scuff the inside of it. I'd rather use my elbow.
LOL
I had that happen once.
I had the drum on a counter top, im leaning down on it with all my weight, with the heels of my hands, just when.......
Im up to my elbows in snare drum.
Ive been doing this routine for about 25 years and this was the first tim I blew one [evans] out.
Very very funny for band mates watching.

best
Old 21st January 2004
  #22
Gear Maniac
 
wurly's Avatar
 

NAMM drum tuning thingy is made by

Drum Tech in Northridge, CA. I was just at their website, it doesn't have any info on the DTS tuning system yet. The product was brand spankin' new at NAMM, they haven't had a chance to update the website yet. I was told that production will start in a few weeks. I'm definitely going to add the DTS system to my studio kit and snare collection.

wurlygig
Latch Lake Music
Old 22nd January 2004
  #23
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
Wurly,

How do you confirm that the tension rods each start at the same tension when you attach the afore mentioned thing-a-mbob?
Old 22nd January 2004
  #24
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

The first time a drummer showed me the need to always stretch a head as part of tuning, I realized that all of the equal tension gadgets are a bunch of bull because they make totally unrealistic assumptions about the uniformity of heads, bearing edges and rims.

The most amazing sounding kit I ever put together had little hinged felt dampers on both the top heads and inside each drum on the bottom head that kept each drum from ringing when other drums in the kit were hit. It flew up out of the way for a half second or so when that particular drum was hit. Getting the mass of the dampers right was very time consuming but well worth the effort.
Old 22nd January 2004
  #25
Gear Maniac
 
wurly's Avatar
 

Answer to question from drumsound

Here's the deal. Each tuning lug goes through a pice of metal that I would describe as an upside down slightly flattened "V". One side has a hole for the tuning lug to go through, the other side has a groove for the "tuning" cable.

The tuning lugs are put in "handtight", and from there, the cable does the rest.

While I fully understand Bob O's skepticism, to my ears, under the admittedly poor listening conditions at NAMM, the Drum Tech DTS tuning system rocked. As a manufacturer of precision metal products, at first glance I thought that the idea had definite merit.

I do not know how they measured to come up with their claim of 1% tuning accuracy around the drum. I sure as heck hope that it works like I thought because it should reeeealllly help in a world full of drummers that don't know how to tune.

YMMV

Jeff Roberts/wurly
Latch Lake Music
Old 22nd January 2004
  #26
Gear Maniac
 
wurly's Avatar
 

I just talked to the President @ Drum Tech

I asked him about the concerns that Bob raised about uneven bearing edges, bent hoops, and uneven tension in the head itself.

By the way it was Tom Henry @818-886-1348 that I spoke to. He said that the best results are obtained with good bearing edges and good hoops. He reccommends die-cast hoops. He said that if a drum doesn't tune well with his system that usually just turning the hoop a lug or two will help to balance things out.

Tom mentioned that a Swedish drum tuning professional challenged the DTS system to a contest at NAMM, and that after a long time the Swede did a slightly better job of tuning than the DTS system, but it didn't hold for two minutes, the DTS tuning lasted much longer. The Swedish tuning pro also ordered DTS tuning kits for himself and his employees. Or so I'm told.

In any case, all of Bob's concerns are realistic. Drum Tech says that in the real world, their system is the quickest, and only realistic way to check the possible range of tuning options between top and bottom heads. Also, if full manual tuning is necessary, the system takes about two minutes to take off or put on.

By the way,their website does have alittle blurb on the DTS tuning sytem with some pictures. WWWdrumtech.com

Jeff Roberts
Latch Lake Music
Old 22nd January 2004
  #27
Lives for gear
 
Sofa King's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally posted by Bob Olhsson
The first time a drummer showed me the need to always stretch a head as part of tuning, I realized that all of the equal tension gadgets are a bunch of bull because they make totally unrealistic assumptions about the uniformity of heads, bearing edges and rims.

The most amazing sounding kit I ever put together had little hinged felt dampers on both the top heads and inside each drum on the bottom head that kept each drum from ringing when other drums in the kit were hit. It flew up out of the way for a half second or so when that particular drum was hit. Getting the mass of the dampers right was very time consuming but well worth the effort.

I agree,
The device is cool, assuming all things are equal. flat hoop, true edges, good head.

I like your idea with the hinges, another similar concept is to put a number of cotton balls in a drum as they bounce, they gently muffle the heads.


take care
Old 24th January 2004
  #28
Han
Lives for gear
 

Every recording engineer should know how, or learn to tune drums, because most drummers can't.

Here's a quick and simple way to tune drums: put your finger in the center of the resonant (bottom) head and gently tap with the tuning key near the lugs on the batter (top) head.

You'll hear only overtones and make sure the tone is the same near each lug.

Tune the resonant head a tad lower or higher than the batter head.
Old 25th January 2004
  #29
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
Quote:
Originally posted by Bob Olhsson
The first time a drummer showed me the need to always stretch a head as part of tuning, I realized that all of the equal tension gadgets are a bunch of bull because they make totally unrealistic assumptions about the uniformity of heads, bearing edges and rims.

The most amazing sounding kit I ever put together had little hinged felt dampers on both the top heads and inside each drum on the bottom head that kept each drum from ringing when other drums in the kit were hit. It flew up out of the way for a half second or so when that particular drum was hit. Getting the mass of the dampers right was very time consuming but well worth the effort.
I need to agreee 110% with Bob's first point. No two heads are created 100% equal. Don't believe me? Go out and pick up a half dozen Ambassadors and tap on each one. All of them will sound a bit different and there will probably one of the bunch that has a vastly different pitch. If it does, it's a bad head.

The hinged dampers are cool but are known to make noise and rattle if they aren't maintained. For a quick fix Moongels are great but even better is to pull the top head off the drum and drop some cotton balls in there. When the drum is hit they'll bounce up and fall back gently on the head and work as a natural, noiseless muffle. It's especially good on floor toms.
Old 9th September 2005
  #30
Lives for gear
 
drundall's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsound
I've been doing it for YEARS with no problems. Of course I'm light. If I was Slippy's size, there's no way I'd do it.tutt

Any good head (Remo, Evans, Aquarian) should have no problem at all.

Jay,

I have to commend you. that's great inf, and coming from a guitarist it's amazing. Kudos
The drum tech I use always stands on the head, and not a little guy.

The first time I saw him do it was pretty shocking, and most of the younger drummers look on in amazement...

Never seen him go through a head. I should ask him if he ever has.
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