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What Do You Want to Know About Live Sound But Are Too Afraid To Ask? Dynamic Microphones
Old 25th June 2015
  #181
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonina View Post
Hi Jetam
Originally I used an analog mixer, n i would direct the bass kick to the subwoofers through a group channel. The mix would sound awesome. By so saying I try to point out that I wasn't aware of the crossover stuff. But now that u mentioned it, I think I'll try it out.
Thanx for that channel patching idea, I surely got lot of spare channels.
And lastly, could u or anybody explain to me that input layer button labeled bus master, and how the matrix exactly work. I read somewhere that they are mixes of mixes but I didn't absolutely grasp the idea.
Thanx in advance
Matrix is almost identical to an aux, the difference is that matrix sends are on buses and auxes are on channels.

I can understand why you prefered having the kick only in the subs if you didn't use a crossover as you would most likely get a lot of low-mids in a system without a crossover.
Anyway if you use a crossover to make the system flat and route the kick to the whole PA, you can still use LPF on the channel if you want to loose highs.
Old 25th June 2015
  #182
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geared up View Post
Impacto,
Can totally relate with you on the volume thing. I always ask performers to "give me all they have" in the volume department. I want all instuments at 100% volume. Most people set it there and dont mess with it. I had one guy that was notorious for keeping his set at half. I tried talking to him. I begged, I pleaded but show after show he kept doing it. I finally had enough and hatched an idea to "make" him conform. We just installed a new foh board and were working out the kinks. During rehearsals I went through my same appeal for everyone to set volume all the way up. Everyone did so, except him. Rehearsals started and I just muted him. The whole band is playing and he is frantically spinning his volume knob up, down, fast, slow, and sideways. I am back in the booth laughing so hard Im crying. Of course the stage is dark and he cant see me. He pulls out his cable, reinserts it, and goes back to spinning his volume nob and this time includes his tone knobs. First song ends and he wants to know why he has no sound. I tell him the new board wont send signal unless it is full volume, and its a new feature on the board. Problem solved. He never tested it by trying to adjust his volume again. He cranks it all the way up every time. He is so trained to it that the other day a guitarists di box went out in the middle of rehearsal, everything came to a halt, and the first thing he did was look at the guitarist and asked if his volume knob was all the way up because if it wasnt it wouldnt pass sound on the new board. Gotta love it!
Very unprofessional behavior on your part and another reason why venue sound guys get such a bad rap. You guys need to learn to mix what you're given and stop trying to tell musicians how to setup and play their instruments.
Old 25th June 2015
  #183
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Son of Gafraidh View Post
Is it OK to ask musicians to get their guitar re-fretted and a better pickup system, or should one just try and deal with what's there? Also, would it be a bit much to supply a quality soundhole pickup (Braggs M1) and insist that musicians use it rather than their built-in system, or even going so far as to have a "house-guitar"?
If you have to mix Keith Richards will you dictate that he not use his noisy vintage guitars? Learn to deal with what you get and don't always try to make things sound the way you want.
Old 25th June 2015
  #184
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonina View Post
I want to be able to manipulate voices n instruments separately according to the performers taste, … I also wanna set the monitors in such a way that they'll be independent on the channel faders.
Watch a couple of YouTube videos that address the 'sends on faders' button of the X32. That should give you many ideas of how to manage how much goes to various busses and the DCA's that you've defined.

The popularity of this board has spawned a whole garden of individually produced videos on operating this thing. That, along with the 'official' video resources provided by Behringer will get you up to speed on the possibilities.
Old 25th June 2015
  #185
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Wow Samc, I don't even know you but you kinda sound like a jerk. Maybe a little too full of yourself. First off, I volunteer my time week after week to run church sound and holiday specials. This was one of those times. Secondly I actually know the guy and we are friends. Mix what Im given? If you have ever mixed live sound (which I assume you have) you would then know a musician boosting his volume by over half will play havoc with a live show. My job is not to make sure I ride one persons fader throughout a presentation. I have 8 other musicians to monitor also. My job is to present the best audio I can with the least amount of problems possible. You may be willing to deal with 3 or 4 people doing whatever they want but it's not realistic. In this case Im not dealing with musicians who do this on a daily basis. As far as giving venue guys a bad name....well your attitude speaks volumes for why they have a bad name. Get off of your high horse!
Old 25th June 2015
  #186
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Son of Gafraidh's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
If you have to mix Keith Richards will you dictate that he not use his noisy vintage guitars? Learn to deal with what you get and don't always try to make things sound the way you want.
Let's just say I'm not referring to that ballpark...there is a difference...I do kinda agree, but I think there's a line, if an acoustic guitar simply cannot play a clean note and has tuning issues, it makes a pretty nasty sound that would require quite exceptional artistry to overcome...as a musician, I feel if one is playing paid gigs they should have decent kit, decent, not exceptional...I do agree supplying a pickup is a bit much, I just can't stand those lo-fi piezos though; I want mics, but they want to move around, so no-go, (DPA clip-ons will probably get broken too quickly, don't think they're all that great either TBH)...
Old 25th June 2015
  #187
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geared up View Post
Wow Samc, I don't even know you but you kinda sound like a jerk.
I don't know you either, but the story you told make you sound like an unprofessional jerk...muting a musician's input, lied about what was happening, and then make fun of him.

Quote:
First off, I volunteer my time week after week to run church sound and holiday specials. This was one of those times. Secondly I actually know the guy and we are friends. Mix what Im given?
Don't know why this is important, except I suppose it makes what you did okay...

Quote:
If you have ever mixed live sound (which I assume you have) you would then know a musician boosting his volume by over half will play havoc with a live show.
Yes, I have mixed live sound...many times actually, just finished mixing a show in fact. I usually just turn down the offending channel or put a limiter on it and not resort to silly games. Plus, I also know that there's a point where he can't turn up the volume anymore and I won't have to think about him then.

Quote:
My job is not to make sure I ride one persons fader throughout a presentation. I have 8 other musicians to monitor also. My job is to present the best audio I can with the least amount of problems possible.
What I know is that when musicians have confidence in you, you rarely need to explain things to them more than once...because they trust you.

Quote:
You may be willing to deal with 3 or 4 people doing whatever they want but it's not realistic. In this case Im not dealing with musicians who do this on a daily basis.
Why do so many sound guys blame musicians for their own short-comings...? If we just learn to do our jobs properly and not get in the way of the musicians and their work we would all be better off for it...we need to understand that it's never about us.

I actually find it amazing that someone could actually defend what you did as a serious and professional solution under any circumstance... I like the view from my high horse, it allows me to see further away and not have tunnel vision.
Old 26th June 2015
  #188
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Son of Gafraidh View Post
Let's just say I'm not referring to that ballpark...there is a difference...I do kinda agree, but I think there's a line, if an acoustic guitar simply cannot play a clean note and has tuning issues, it makes a pretty nasty sound that would require quite exceptional artistry to overcome...as a musician, I feel if one is playing paid gigs they should have decent kit, decent, not exceptional...I do agree supplying a pickup is a bit much, I just can't stand those lo-fi piezos though; I want mics, but they want to move around, so no-go, (DPA clip-ons will probably get broken too quickly, don't think they're all that great either TBH)...
The point was just that if you can't dictate to Keith why do you think you should dictate to someone else?

The only thing you need to remember is that; it is their gig, not yours and because it's their gig, they have the right to what they want, how they want...and you can decide not to work with them if you don't like or agree with what they're doing. It really is that simple.

The person playing the guitar is responsible for the type and condition of the guitar, (s)he is also responsible for how it's played.
Old 26th June 2015
  #189
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Why do you need to max-out everyone's amps anyway, I can understand asking someone to turn it down...besides, maybe they value their hearing; I certainly wouldn't compromise my hearing for an FOH...

Last edited by Son of Gafraidh; 26th June 2015 at 12:44 AM..
Old 26th June 2015
  #190
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
The point was just that if you can't dictate to Keith why do you think you should dictate to someone else?

The only thing you need to remember is that; it is their gig, not yours and because it's their gig, they have the right to what they want, how they want...and you can decide not to work with them if you don't like or agree with what they're doing. It really is that simple.

The person playing the guitar is responsible for the type and condition of the guitar, (s)he is also responsible for how it's played.
OK, I agree with your philosophy there...I'm guessing, perhaps, you might be a bit of a fan of Steve Albini?

I do agree in the case of a venue's FOH, and obviously if you have been hired by the band...that said, I don't think it's unreasonable to offer advice on topics which one might be knowledgeable on; that said, if they have an aesthetic rationale for something you see as a technical issue, that is a different matter...

...I didn't really state the context, which, in the case of what I'm half referring to, means I have to "look after the quality of the artists", I won't say much more because it would be unprofessional, in the unlikely event...let's say, I would like to offer advice, or correct issues, that I feel are unprofessional, or not up to scratch...
Old 26th June 2015
  #191
At certain venues you may have responsibilities to both the band and the management (e.g. clubs). In certain cases, you will need to put your foot down on things like stage volume. That being said, I would never try to trick a musician or be an ass. Most musicians respond well if you simply discuss any problems and potential solutions (you need to turn DOWN is probably the most common one, lol). If I had to I would walk on the stage and turn down their amp myself (but this was extremely rare). Most guys want to play the room again so they are going to be reasonable. Just be professional and not get pissed off was always my motto.

Peace,
TC
Old 26th June 2015
  #192
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Son of Gafraidh View Post
...let's say, I would like to offer advice, or correct issues, that I feel are unprofessional, or not up to scratch...
Offering sensible advise is usually okay provided it's done in an appropriate manner, in context and at the appropriate time.

You should not be offended however when/if the advise is not taken, the artist/band may have a good reason for doing things their way. This is why we should not underestimate the psychological aspect of this job...it's not just about pushing faders and twisting knobs.
Old 26th June 2015
  #193
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCgypsy View Post
At certain venues you may have responsibilities to both the band and the management (e.g. clubs). In certain cases, you will need to put your foot down on things like stage volume. That being said, I would never try to trick a musician or be an ass. Most musicians respond well if you simply discuss any problems and potential solutions (you need to turn DOWN is probably the most common one, lol). If I had to I would walk on the stage and turn down their amp myself (but this was extremely rare). Most guys want to play the room again so they are going to be reasonable. Just be professional and not get pissed off was always my motto.

Peace,
TC
I can understand a SPL limit for the room in general, in which case you can let the band know that if they play at a certain level you will have to lower the FOH to stay below the limit. But there is no way a venue owner or manager is going to get me to go on stage and mess with a musician's gear during a show...my responsibilities to the venue will never go that far.

A venue has the right to set the SPL limit in their room, but to set the limit for the stage is unusual to say the least.

I agree with the rest of your post.
Old 26th June 2015
  #194
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loujudson's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Son of Gafraidh View Post
Is it OK to ask musicians to get their guitar re-fretted and a better pickup system, or should one just try and deal with what's there? Also, would it be a bit much to supply a quality soundhole pickup (Braggs M1) and insist that musicians use it rather than their built-in system, or even going so far as to have a "house-guitar"?
Are you the sound guy, or the guitar tech, or what? Are you a fustrated guitarist trying to run the band?

I NEVER avise band member on their gear, I just proceed to make it sound as good as I can, that is my job.

Why would you mess with them that way? You won't get hired agai as a sound guy that way unless the particular guitarist finds your suggestions valuable. Not worth the isik unless you really don't want to be the FOH any more!
Old 26th June 2015
  #195
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loujudson's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geared up View Post
Wow Samc, I don't even know you but you kinda sound like a jerk. Maybe a little too full of yourself. First off, I volunteer my time week after week to run church sound and holiday specials. This was one of those times. Secondly I actually know the guy and we are friends. Mix what Im given? If you have ever mixed live sound (which I assume you have) you would then know a musician boosting his volume by over half will play havoc with a live show. My job is not to make sure I ride one persons fader throughout a presentation. I have 8 other musicians to monitor also. My job is to present the best audio I can with the least amount of problems possible. You may be willing to deal with 3 or 4 people doing whatever they want but it's not realistic. In this case Im not dealing with musicians who do this on a daily basis. As far as giving venue guys a bad name....well your attitude speaks volumes for why they have a bad name. Get off of your high horse!
Sam is no jerk, but you are kinda sounding like one! Some of us make out livings doing live sound, not just volunteer at a church, and we learn over the years to respect the musicians and what they choose to use. Think about high horses and look in the mirror! And see about observing some professionals at wor, not at church...

If he is your friend then do what you want, but it is not a sound person's job to mess with the performer's gear, unless asked.
Old 26th June 2015
  #196
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loujudson View Post
Are you the sound guy, or the guitar tech, or what? Are you a fustrated guitarist trying to run the band?

I NEVER avise band member on their gear, I just proceed to make it sound as good as I can, that is my job.

Why would you mess with them that way? You won't get hired agai as a sound guy that way unless the particular guitarist finds your suggestions valuable. Not worth the isik unless you really don't want to be the FOH any more!
Not hired by the band, hired by the owner to design/install a new PA system and stage setup, with an emphasis on simplifying things, and "making the live music sound good"...the PA in the stage area isn't all that bad, mostly the quality of the music varies due to the quality of the musicians and their equipment/setup...I have mentioned this, however, I am being made feel responsible, on the flipside, I don't want to be the guy who says so and so has to go...that said, I'm reluctant to install a high-end sound reinforcement system if the musician's equipment is going to be so poor/has issues...

And yes, I am good at setting up guitars and I know when one has issues...if a musician had a faulty pedalboard that was emitting quite serious buzz would you just proceed to make it sound as good as you can?
Old 26th June 2015
  #197
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When there is a problem, offering help is fine, but I wait until they ask me. I have two hours for soundcheck and a show at 8!

One time at a big outdoor house concert, we had all kinds of buzz and weirdness coming from a bass. We switched amps, no change, switch to a different power source, and then found out a. the bass player had wired his own instrument badly, and b. the host has changed th wiring in his house with some automatic dimmer light switches. The combination was RFI all over the place. But I didn't try to re-do the bass, or criticize the host. Now we just run a cable to another room to get power...
Old 3rd July 2015
  #198
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Hello Im 21 years old and I Started freelancing doing audio visual work about 4 months ago. I guess my question is what would make me a more valuable freelancer in the indusrty to give myself a higher rate. What kind of certifications can I take or recommended books maybe. Anything that would make me more knowledgeable in what I do.

Thanks.
Old 3rd July 2015
  #199
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Follows a response to a young woman I've worked with in the past who is leaving a staff job for the wonderful world of freelance. Most of the references are directly informed by my 30+ years freelancing in Nashville. Choose what applies and discard the rest. You CANNOT "give yourself a higher rate". Your market and its conditions will see to that. What you can do is to continue to make yourself more valuable, so as to be able to ask for and get a higher rate than a total noob. Response begins:

Number one bit of advice: especially in this town, personal relationships are key (good old American Know-Who)… followed by being willing to work any and every related job (that you don’t lose money doing… very important, that); to never stop learning about everything related to your field; to strive to master gear and technique so as to be the best you can be in every situation; to keep your ego on a very short leash in pretty much every situation; and to buy “smart” on the way up, regarding support gear (buying the best you can possibly afford, learning how to maintain it, knowing how to use it, and having access to back-up gear ASAP). Knowing who’s throwing the party is key… bringing the best you can to the party is a very close second.

I decided early on I wanted to be not “just” a hired gun (an operator without gear) but to provide complete services packages in the fields in which I was interested… freelance photography, followed by weekend DJ and small PA, video production (a 5-year stint in the late '90s on a national spring/fall tour gig allowed the acquisition of gear that served me well for 15 years), meetings support, and location audio recording. The biggest downside for me is a garage full of perfectly good but (now) obsolete audio and video gear… fortunately, the newer stuff (particularly video), while pricy, is a LOT more affordable than it was then. Downside: everybody with a thousand dollars worth of gear thinks they are a photographer/videographer/audio engineer. The open secret: they’re not. And that’s what you have to do: be one who is.

In setting your rates… decide what you need to live at the lifestyle level you desire (my first year here was living with in-laws, so more income could be directed to building the business than if we had jumped straight into a house) … how many days a week/month/year you “want” to work (I still have trouble not wanting to book every possible day)… and “reality check" local “prevailing” rates for what it is you want to do. The trick is to be a qualified person (reputation and resumé) who is attractive to new clients without undercutting the prevailing rates (everybody loses) and to not set your initial rate so low that you can’t live on the income. It’s really hard to significantly raise rates on established clients. One thing that worked for me with tentative new photo clients was to quote my firm rate, but to agree that, if the outcome was unusable (and no images were delivered) there would be no charge. I have NEVER worked on contingency (or “on spec”)… there was never an incident of “no charge”… and several long-term clients resulted. A bit of Pro Bono work for non-profits helps your exposure… but don’t rely on it for future paying gigs. If you want to give it (your time and talent) away, fine. Otherwise, charge enough for the client to value your time and expertise, and to stay in business. As a very wise and very successful photog once told me (and a room full of other freelance photogs)... “You’ll never go broke saying ‘No’ to a bad deal.” True, dat.

Don’t forget to factor into your planning “little" things like health insurance, professional liability insurance (especially if you move toward a complete gear package… renter’s insurance will likely not cover “pro” gear outside the dwelling), savings, charitable contributions, and an emergency fund for when that camera (or mixer… last week) craps out on you on a gig.

Finally… I love making my living playing with all my favorite toys. In two years, I will have outlived my Dad, who got to “live” his dream only after nearly 30 years of doing his “job”… in 1982 I went to lunch one day at a perfectly good staff photog job, and was handed an envelope with two weeks pay and an apology from the VP of HR upon my return. 90 days later, drawing unemployment compensation, my first wife, baby daughter and I moved in with her folks, and I hung out my shingle… knowing all of five or six people in all of Nashville who might be able to hire me. A year later we put a deposit down on a house in the neighborhood... a status I can't imagine without Providence playing a major part, and working as hard and as smart as I was capable of doing.

I cannot imagine the past 30 years being any better, all-in-all. Still married to my first wife, my daughter's family live next door with grandkids, my son has 15 acres just outside the city, and, most importantly, I love doing what I do... I totally enjoy seeing annual clients eight or ten times a year at their week-long annual meeting "gigs"... and I still enjoy pushing my comfort zone with new technology and really cool gear.

What's not to love?

Best of luck...

HB

Last edited by hbphotoav; 3rd July 2015 at 11:10 PM..
Old 4th July 2015
  #200
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Great post (as usual) Harry...respect.
Old 6th July 2015
  #201
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Here is my question that I am too afraid to ask.

I do encourage vocalists to eat the mic when singing softly. I also like the proximity effect as it makes voices sound more rich and fat. But...

Almost every time I run sound, I get frustrated with the plosives that come through. It drives me crazy. I usually end up enabling HPF for all of my vocal channels. On some vocals, I even need to carve out low-mid, (perhaps around 100 to 300 Hz,) to keep things from sounding far too boomy during plosives. I try to find a happy medium between eliminating plosives and keeping vocals from sounding too thin. I don't think that I have too much sub for the gig because most other instrument channels get boosted slightly in the lows.

Have I simply been choosing the wrong vocal mics, (EV N/D767a, Sennheiser e835, and Heil PR22,)? ...or is this a common problem that plagues every soundman out there?

EDIT: I frequently use compression on my vocal channels as well. It helps some, but not completely.
Old 6th July 2015
  #202
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loujudson's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by RawDepth View Post
Here is my question that I am too afraid to ask.

I do encourage vocalists to eat the mic when singing softly. I also like the proximity effect as it makes voices sound more rich and fat. But...
[edit]
Have I simply been choosing the wrong vocal mics, (EV N/D767a, Sennheiser e835, and Heil PR22,)? ...or is this a common problem that plagues every soundman out there?

EDIT: I frequently use compression on my vocal channels as well. It helps some, but not completely.
Good mics, but the plosives are a matter of vocal mic technique - it is 100% controllable by the singer! You can use foam windscreens, and some mics are worse than others (for example, Telefunken M80s are pretty bad for plosives but sound great otherwise!).

You can show the singers how the breaths feel with a couple of fingers (no, not that one!) by having them put two fingers where the mic is and make some p and B sounds, and learn how to direct the breath over the mic. Getting close to the mic is fine, but having the mic point upwards a little from just below the lips lets the breath pass over the diaphragm, and has the added benefit of letting the audience actially see their lips! One thing often neglected it to be sure the front of the mic points right at the mouth, and do not let them sing into the side of it - the side ports make much worse pops!

As I grow in my sound technique and improve equipment (over a 40 year career), I find I can control the singers approach to the mic by giving them enough clean clear monitor that they don't need to "eat the mic" and still be heard nicely without pops and thumps. If the stage volume it too loud, it is much more difficult, but that is one reason I haven't done rock shows for years (except when the venue does lousy bookings) and much prefer jazz, folk, and so on.

Best luck! I use e835s and SM-87s, Beta87s and 535s and KMS-105s, depending on the act. And I always use the locut and some compression on vocals, just a bit to taste with a low ratio, 2.6, 3.2, or 4:1 usually.
Old 6th July 2015
  #203
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RawDepth View Post
Here is my question that I am too afraid to ask.

I do encourage vocalists to eat the mic when singing softly. I also like the proximity effect as it makes voices sound more rich and fat. But...

Almost every time I run sound, I get frustrated with the plosives that come through. It drives me crazy. I usually end up enabling HPF for all of my vocal channels. On some vocals, I even need to carve out low-mid, (perhaps around 100 to 300 Hz,) to keep things from sounding far too boomy during plosives. I try to find a happy medium between eliminating plosives and keeping vocals from sounding too thin. I don't think that I have too much sub for the gig because most other instrument channels get boosted slightly in the lows.

Have I simply been choosing the wrong vocal mics, (EV N/D767a, Sennheiser e835, and Heil PR22,)? ...or is this a common problem that plagues every soundman out there?

EDIT: I frequently use compression on my vocal channels as well. It helps some, but not completely.
It seems you have been encouraging bad technique on the part of the singers and is paying the price for it.

Let the vocalist ease off the mic a bit and you might also want to ease up on the compression a bit too...bring up your threshold a bit.
Old 6th July 2015
  #204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Im Minimal View Post
Hello Im 21 years old and I Started freelancing doing audio visual work about 4 months ago. I guess my question is what would make me a more valuable freelancer in the indusrty to give myself a higher rate. What kind of certifications can I take or recommended books maybe. Anything that would make me more knowledgeable in what I do.

Thanks.
Experience, and a great attitude. The more gigs you do, and the more people love you at the end of those gigs, the more gigs you will get. A great attitude goes a long way, in fact I might venture to say it goes farther than great skill.

80% of your day on a tour is the hang, 20% is the show, if people don't love being around you, you don't get the gig. If people don't trust you to do a great job, you don't get the gig.

But don't put audio skill way over personal skills, they're both incredibly relevant.
Old 6th July 2015
  #205
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RawDepth's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
...you might also want to ease up on the compression a bit too...bring up your threshold a bit.
What gave you the impression that my threshold is too low or that I compress too hard?
Old 6th July 2015
  #206
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RawDepth View Post
What gave you the impression that my threshold is too low or that I compress too hard?
It's just a guess, but if the threshold is too low and you're slamming too hard even the low level sounds can sound as loud as the loud sounds...just a thought, something you might look at.
Old 6th July 2015
  #207
KEL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RawDepth View Post
Here is my question that I am too afraid to ask.

I do encourage vocalists to eat the mic when singing softly. I also like the proximity effect as it makes voices sound more rich and fat. But...

Almost every time I run sound, I get frustrated with the plosives that come through. It drives me crazy. I usually end up enabling HPF for all of my vocal channels. On some vocals, I even need to carve out low-mid, (perhaps around 100 to 300 Hz,) to keep things from sounding far too boomy during plosives. I try to find a happy medium between eliminating plosives and keeping vocals from sounding too thin. I don't think that I have too much sub for the gig because most other instrument channels get boosted slightly in the lows.

Have I simply been choosing the wrong vocal mics, (EV N/D767a, Sennheiser e835, and Heil PR22,)? ...or is this a common problem that plagues every soundman out there?

EDIT: I frequently use compression on my vocal channels as well. It helps some, but not completely.
That's not poor advice for a lot of singers. Some singers are bad p-poppers and some can kiss the windscreen and not have issues. There is nothing wrong with using a HPF on vocal channels either. I'll use HPF on every single input. On experienced vocalists you let them do their thing and adjust what you need to for a good sound. Eat the mic is probably better advice than letting someone drift a foot away. Cutting is easy. Trying to account for all the bleed hash and monitor gains is not. If you're giving advice at all it probably means you're dealing with less experienced performers, kids or weekenders.

Your sub to tops balance might still be off significantly. Just because you might be adding LF to any single input does not indicate if the balance is out. For instance, if the system is tuned well, you may find that little EQ is needed for a lot of sources, granted you've chosen a good mic and placed it well. You could have a channel fader too low and be using EQ to bring out something that takes care of itself with a balanced system.
Old 8th July 2015
  #208
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryanojohn View Post
Experience, and a great attitude. The more gigs you do, and the more people love you at the end of those gigs, the more gigs you will get. A great attitude goes a long way, in fact I might venture to say it goes farther than great skill.

80% of your day on a tour is the hang, 20% is the show, if people don't love being around you, you don't get the gig. If people don't trust you to do a great job, you don't get the gig.

But don't put audio skill way over personal skills, they're both incredibly relevant.
This is great advice thank you. I plan on taking it a long way.
Old 12th August 2015
  #209
Here for the gear
 

As a noob here I have a "question I'm afraid to ask". I guess I'm pretty-much a beginner to live sound, for about a year I've been running the sound for my girlfriend and me doing small singing gigs to backing tracks. We have been using beta 58a wired mics through a Yamaha MG10XU mixer into a Bose L1 model 1.

With a lot of studying online, brain-picking, trial and error etc. I've managed to achieve fairly good results. My question relates to a recently bought a pair of Shure GLX-D wireless mics with beta 58a heads. I sort of understand the whole gain-staging thing but I'm in a bit of a fix with the new mics.

The manual says to set the gain on the receiver by using the audio meter which in itself seems straightforward. I've set this at +15db. As a result the signal to the mixer is way hot. I've had to set the channel gain around the 8 o'clock position as opposed to the 1 o'clock or thereabouts that seemed to work well with the wired beta 58a. The mixer channels have pad buttons which I've tried but I don't know whether that's the right thing to do. I'm looking for a bit of guidance here in order to achieve the best results with this equipment.

Can anyone help... please! Regards... Kenny
Old 13th August 2015
  #210
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by dentman View Post
As a noob here I have a "question I'm afraid to ask". I guess I'm pretty-much a beginner to live sound, for about a year I've been running the sound for my girlfriend and me doing small singing gigs to backing tracks. We have been using beta 58a wired mics through a Yamaha MG10XU mixer into a Bose L1 model 1.

With a lot of studying online, brain-picking, trial and error etc. I've managed to achieve fairly good results. My question relates to a recently bought a pair of Shure GLX-D wireless mics with beta 58a heads. I sort of understand the whole gain-staging thing but I'm in a bit of a fix with the new mics.

The manual says to set the gain on the receiver by using the audio meter which in itself seems straightforward. I've set this at +15db. As a result the signal to the mixer is way hot. I've had to set the channel gain around the 8 o'clock position as opposed to the 1 o'clock or thereabouts that seemed to work well with the wired beta 58a. The mixer channels have pad buttons which I've tried but I don't know whether that's the right thing to do. I'm looking for a bit of guidance here in order to achieve the best results with this equipment.

Can anyone help... please! Regards... Kenny
If your mixer isn't clipping, it's good.
You want to have most of the needed gain in the first stage, otherwise you'll be also amplifying the noise of all the previous stages. If you can get the level low enough that it isn't clipping without using a pad, it's great. You'll certainly get a lot more level from a wireless receiver than from a dynamic microphone.
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