The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
What Do You Want to Know About Live Sound But Are Too Afraid To Ask? Dynamic Microphones
Old 13th May 2014
  #151
Lives for gear
 
Aisle 6's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by XENGS View Post
Well I didn't use the phrase "a lot" but "plenty", which I think translates to "sufficient", and expanded on that with "I don't think anyone should trust me with anything more than an x32, a pair of speakers and a couple of subs. I simply lack lots of practical experience."
My apologies. I did not know that English was your second language. The context certainly helps.

Like I said, offer to help doing anything, listen, watch and keep your mouth shut, only asking questions when appropriate. Obviously, if you need to know something, then ask, just choose appropriate times to ask...and good luck.
Old 13th May 2014
  #152
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by XENGS View Post
I really do believe there's still LOTS of things to learn, I don't see how two people understood the exact opposite... Is my English that bad?
Different people may have had different reactions to your post but did you notice that at least two people who hire have a similar reaction? This has nothing to do with your command of the english language, which seem to be above the average level for a 15 year old…but as I've said before; "How we say something is oftentimes just as important as what was said."

People seem to forget that this is a service industry and that there is more to this job than just pushing faders and twisting knobs…underestimating the social and psychological aspects of this job is a big mistake. You can't live and work in this world and reject the opinions of others…especially when you work with and for other people. How and what they think about you will determine if you work or not.

Aisle 6 made a point about hiring and what's most important to him and from past experience I can say he's not the only employer who thinks like this. The world is full of good musicians and sound engineers who don't work as much as they should because people don't want to work with them despite their talents.

Again…how you treat this information is up to you.
Old 13th May 2014
  #153
Lives for gear
 
Wyllys's Avatar
 

Yup.

It's 10% what you can do and 90% who you are...
Old 13th May 2014
  #154
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aisle 6 View Post
My apologies. I did not know that English was your second language. The context certainly helps.

Like I said, offer to help doing anything, listen, watch and keep your mouth shut, only asking questions when appropriate. Obviously, if you need to know something, then ask, just choose appropriate times to ask...and good luck.
Yeah, my mother tongue is actually Greek.
...That's a great piece of advice, thank you

Quote:
Originally Posted by Samc View Post
Different people may have had different reactions to your post but did you notice that at least two people who hire have a similar reaction? This has nothing to do with your command of the english language, which seem to be above the average level for a 15 year old…but as I've said before; "How we say something is oftentimes just as important as what was said."

People seem to forget that this is a service industry and that there is more to this job than just pushing faders and twisting knobs…underestimating the social and psychological aspects of this job is a big mistake. You can't live and work in this world and reject the opinions of others…especially when you work with and for other people. How and what they think about you will determine if you work or not.

Aisle 6 made a point about hiring and what's most important to him and from past experience I can say he's not the only employer who thinks like this. The world is full of good musicians and sound engineers who don't work as much as they should because people don't want to work with them despite their talents.

Again…how you treat this information is up to you.
So, having a good attitude as well as being friendly and social? Maybe I'm a bit shy (Okay, maybe not a bit :P), but I always respect everyone I work with (Weather that's in school or anywhere else... Maaaybe with the exception of just oooone teacher that's driving the whole school mad... heh ). As far as rejecting one's opinion; I never reject one's opinion unless I sense it's too one-sided. But we all learn stuff from other people (If we didn't, we would just be monkeys...), and one can always be wrong and/or misinformed.

But, anyway, that's what discussion is for... Right?

Thanks!
Old 13th May 2014
  #155
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyllys View Post
Yup.

It's 10% what you can do and 90% who you are...
I guess that rounds it all up
Thanks
Old 13th May 2014
  #156
Lives for gear
 
Dutchy15's Avatar
XENGS:

I totally get you, I'm almost 19 now and I've been there too. I've done loads of live audio stuff at my secondary school, which was a great help. I also spent some time at a local radio station, mixing bands and fixing up the place (lying up-side-down underneath a desk soldering mic cables, pulling half a mile of cables off the ceiling, stuff like that). I've been fortunate enough to be working freelance for a local rental company a few times a year. The first 2 years I was only pushing flightcases around, but about 1,5 year ago I started doing monitors and/or FOH on small gigs. When you're with a rental company, there's not so much to worry about, you'll start at the very bottom anyway, you'll work your way up from there if you have the right mentality and attitude.
I had this gear-addiction thing for a few years just like you have it now, you know all the specs and prices and which companies own what gear. It'll end automatically some day when you just feel like you've had enough. I do think it's part of the process though, so don't worry about it.
I am now at a point where this long-time (about 4 years already :O ) hobby of mine is turning into a career. I'm doing my final exams these days and I passed the entrance exams for Art Of Sound at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague (The Netherlands, where I live), so if all goes according to plan, I'll be starting there after the summer.
From all the years I've been messing around, mixing multitracks in Reaper, doing all kinds of stuff related to audio (like making my own cables, learn how to do so!) I haven't only learned a hell lot, I also got to know a lot of people, so I already have a bit of a network and I had a hell of great time doing all that stuff, which is mighty important as well!
Go out there, be eager to learn, try to learn as much as you can, accept that you'll always start at the very bottom and take it as a challenge instead of a loss. I you always give a 110% and try your very best you will meet awesome people, do awesome things, learn a hell lot of stuff and you might even make a bit of money in the process.

Good luck!

Edit: Aisle 6 is just right, do what you have been told, even if you know it's wrong. If there's time, you can point out that you did as they said, but you feel like it could be done better/different/more appropriate. Don't do that if there's no time!
Try to think logically, don't walk in other people's way, ask what to do if you don't know what to do. If instructions aren't clear enough, ask for elaboration, if you're not sure you did something right, ask it. Don't touch things you don't know anything about. Make sure you know exactly what's going on with things like 3-phase power supplies and rigging before working with them.
Listen to a crapload of music, specifically the music you *don't* like! Slowly move towards the edges of the musical world. If you're into softrock, checkout some poprock, then some classic rock, then modern rock, then hardrock, then sludge/stoner, then metal, and so on and so forth. It'll take a while, and you won't like everything, but you'll start appreciating it, which is enough.


Dutchy
Old 14th May 2014
  #157
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchy15 View Post
XENGS:

I totally get you, I'm almost 19 now and I've been there too. I've done loads of live audio stuff at my secondary school, which was a great help. I also spent some time at a local radio station, mixing bands and fixing up the place (lying up-side-down underneath a desk soldering mic cables, pulling half a mile of cables off the ceiling, stuff like that). I've been fortunate enough to be working freelance for a local rental company a few times a year. The first 2 years I was only pushing flightcases around, but about 1,5 year ago I started doing monitors and/or FOH on small gigs. When you're with a rental company, there's not so much to worry about, you'll start at the very bottom anyway, you'll work your way up from there if you have the right mentality and attitude.
I had this gear-addiction thing for a few years just like you have it now, you know all the specs and prices and which companies own what gear. It'll end automatically some day when you just feel like you've had enough. I do think it's part of the process though, so don't worry about it.
I am now at a point where this long-time (about 4 years already :O ) hobby of mine is turning into a career. I'm doing my final exams these days and I passed the entrance exams for Art Of Sound at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague (The Netherlands, where I live), so if all goes according to plan, I'll be starting there after the summer.
From all the years I've been messing around, mixing multitracks in Reaper, doing all kinds of stuff related to audio (like making my own cables, learn how to do so!) I haven't only learned a hell lot, I also got to know a lot of people, so I already have a bit of a network and I had a hell of great time doing all that stuff, which is mighty important as well!
Go out there, be eager to learn, try to learn as much as you can, accept that you'll always start at the very bottom and take it as a challenge instead of a loss. I you always give a 110% and try your very best you will meet awesome people, do awesome things, learn a hell lot of stuff and you might even make a bit of money in the process.

Good luck!

Edit: Aisle 6 is just right, do what you have been told, even if you know it's wrong. If there's time, you can point out that you did as they said, but you feel like it could be done better/different/more appropriate. Don't do that if there's no time!
Try to think logically, don't walk in other people's way, ask what to do if you don't know what to do. If instructions aren't clear enough, ask for elaboration, if you're not sure you did something right, ask it. Don't touch things you don't know anything about. Make sure you know exactly what's going on with things like 3-phase power supplies and rigging before working with them.
Listen to a crapload of music, specifically the music you *don't* like! Slowly move towards the edges of the musical world. If you're into softrock, checkout some poprock, then some classic rock, then modern rock, then hardrock, then sludge/stoner, then metal, and so on and so forth. It'll take a while, and you won't like everything, but you'll start appreciating it, which is enough.


Dutchy
I've been doing some live audio stuff at my school as well, and I have a very good friend of mine that's in a band, so I get the chance to do recordings of them as well... And I'm doing this ProTools Multitrack stuff...

This radio idea is great, although radio stations here are pretty small and don't have any live bands what-so-ever - We do have a couple of TV stations, though... Do you think that would work?

For me, this all started about 3 years ago, while I was in the last grade of elementary school (6th grade... Here we have 6 grades in elementary, 3 in Jr. High School, and another 3 in High School)... Anyway, the teacher that was in charge of the "technical" stuff in the school's celebrations, chose me to work with the audio; Although I knew almost nothing xD I knew what the faders were, and the EQ, how amps/speakers worked, and why feedback occurred... That's all :P And that's what got me interested... I would then spend countless hours in front of the computer, reading up on any sort of info I would find, learning stuff. Meanwhile, I went to Jr. High School, and met this friend of mine, who also played (with his band) at School celebrations, and two years later (2013/14), where I finally felt I was confident enough to do proper live sound, I started getting involved in my school's stuff.

Anyway, as for not touching things I don't know nothing about, I generally tend to follow this. Even with stuff I'm familiar with, after one incident I had with a classmate's iPhone, I tend to stay away from it (I was upgrading it, when I accidentally dropped it off my desk, smashing the screen, and, I think, some sort of chip... It was already HEAVILY abused, and this was the tip of the iceberg. Nevertheless, I had to buy a new one...).

As for 3-phase power supplies and generators, I know how they work, but maybe I can read up on rigging a bit more :P

Thanks for everything, this is all great advice! I truly appreciate it
Old 12th May 2015
  #158
Here for the gear
Basic question about controlling volume.

I took the plunge and bought a used Allen & Heath ZED60-14FX, and so far just have a single 10" Alto. Since I'm so new with this board and all it can do I need to start with a basic question. The volume dial shows clockwise from 6 O-clock to 12 O-clock as "Line", then from 12 O-clock to 6 O-clock as "Mic". I don't understand why the dial shows this? What position should I have my individual speaker volume at? I'll of course control the volume using the main mix fader, but what about the speaker level?

I've read players set their guitar dials at max and control the volume and tone using their amps. Should I use the same concept and just set the speaker at max and control volume using the faders?
Old 12th May 2015
  #159
Lives for gear
 
Dutchy15's Avatar
It seems like your speaker has an input that will take both mic and line inputs, or it has separate line and mic inputs. This dial of yours has the maximum level for line signals at 12 O-clock and the maximum for mic level signals at 6 O-clock.


Dutchy
Old 12th May 2015
  #160
Here for the gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchy15 View Post
It seems like your speaker has an input that will take both mic and line inputs, or it has separate line and mic inputs. This dial of yours has the maximum level for line signals at 12 O-clock and the maximum for mic level signals at 6 O-clock.
Dutchy
Thanks. Which should I use mic or line, and should I set the speaker at max if I'm using it as a main monitor?
Old 12th May 2015
  #161
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SFDonovan View Post
Basic question about controlling volume.

I took the plunge and bought a used Allen & Heath ZED60-14FX, and so far just have a single 10" Alto. Since I'm so new with this board and all it can do I need to start with a basic question. The volume dial shows clockwise from 6 O-clock to 12 O-clock as "Line", then from 12 O-clock to 6 O-clock as "Mic". I don't understand why the dial shows this? What position should I have my individual speaker volume at? I'll of course control the volume using the main mix fader, but what about the speaker level?

I've read players set their guitar dials at max and control the volume and tone using their amps. Should I use the same concept and just set the speaker at max and control volume using the faders?
Among several things it's useful to understand, is that the control on the back of the speaker is a sensitivity control. It simply controls how much power the speaker's amp needs to run at its full capacity. Depending on what you feed it, you can make it as loud as it can get no matter where the knob is set. It has those "mic" and "line" ranges because those are the sensitivity ranges appropriate for either a direct microphone signal or a "line level" signal, which is the kind your mixer sends from it's main outputs. Note that microphones need more sensitivity than line-level signals.

So you need to think about that control in context. You could turn it all the way up and make the amp as sensitive as possible, and then you'd get big volume with just a little or a moderate bit coming from your mixer's output. Or you could set it lower and you'll need to turn your mixer output up more to get more volume. And of course what your mixer output control does for you will depend on the gain structure upstream from that. If you've got things set correctly at the channel inputs and the channel faders, plus whatever EQ and effects you're using, you'd do best to set the sensitivity control on the speaker at a spot where you have some comfortable play on your mixer's output in case you need to turn up or down during a gig. This is assuming that you're running sound yourself and that you'll need a control near to hand to adjust volume in the course of a gig. You don't want to have to walk over to a speaker up on a stand somewhere to adjust its sensitivity.

You probably won't need all the volume you could get from that speaker (and that speaker isn't going to sound its best up really loud, anyway), so set it so that you have a workable volume at a few dBs below the "0" marker on your main mixer output. That way you have room to go up, if need be. And don't set it so high that very small adjustments on the mixer output give you big changes or where you're making the speaker amp clip well before you get anywhere near maximum on the main miser output fader. As I said, give yourself a little play so it's easy to make small adjustments as necessary.

Since you're not looking to squeeze every bit out of your system for big rock and roll volume, you'll be fine. There are ways of adjusting the gain structure of the system so that you reach clipping on your speaker's power amp just before you start to clip on the mixer, but you can be much less worried about that when you're running a small PA at moderate volumes in small venues. Just make sure you know how to set the gain stages upstream correctly without clipping and without amplifying too much noise.

So: Set your input gains properly for each channel. Set your channel faders a little below "0" as a starting point and set the control on the back of the speaker so that you have enough play in your main mix output fader to control volume for the house easily. 12:00 is probably a good starting point. Aim for your starting volume for the gig being what you get when your main mixer output is a bit below the "0" marker on the main fader and make sure that the final position for the control on the speaker is at a spot that allows you to make whatever adjustments you need to make at the mixer without little moves on the fader creating big changes in the output or without finding yourself with your main fader all the way up and not enough volume. Use your channel faders to get the balance you need between your various input signals.

If you find yourself unable to get enough volume without setting things so your speaker starts to clip a a lot, you need another speaker--or more probably more powerful ones.

Louis
Old 13th May 2015
  #162
Here's a dumb question - is there a 'standard' monitor set up for a festival type stage?

Say you have a setup with 4 monitors or pairs of monitors across the front, plus say 3 more monitors in a second row for keys, horns and drums. Which auxes would feed which monitor? and if the stage had IEM's for other acts, which auxes would feed them?
Old 13th May 2015
  #163
XENGS,

just one thing that may give you some ideas - I work part time doing IT, and through summer, I'm also doing 20-40 hours a week of sound work.
Through winter seasons my part time day job gives me time to snowboard :-)

I own no PA gear at all - just a kit of mics, some good headphones and various cables and adapters. Often I don't even use my own mics, if the band, venue or PA hire co has the stuff I want.
My point is that you don't have to own gear to do sound. If you build a reputation as an operator, you can do fine, and without the stress of owning gear.

Last edited by bbrunskill; 13th May 2015 at 08:50 AM..
Old 18th May 2015
  #164
Where is the talent knob on the mixer? Just can't seem to find it when I really need it...

(sorry couldn't resist)
Old 19th May 2015
  #165
Here for the gear
what tips do you guys have for me? When I'm setting up a band I ask the keyboard player to put his volume at 3/4 then I adjust the gain. When the band starts a lot of them raise the volume all the way or when I asked them to put it at 3/4 it was really at 1/2 to then later raise it all the way. :-/ This screws me up big time because then the keyboard stands out like crazy until I go in and readjust it. If they want more volume in the monitor I would be more than happy to give it to them. Do they not realize that doing this yes they will have more volume in their monitor but make the band sound bad in foh. Should I use a limiter? Or just a compressor? And if a compressor what ratio? Thanks guys
Old 22nd May 2015
  #166
Gear Head
 

Xengs - You may want to consider doing what I did - that is becoming an apprentice to someone to learn their craft. Professionals are usually thrilled to share their knowledge with someone who genuinely wants to learn. You won't get paid at first but consider that paying your dues to prove your dedication.
Interest+dedication+attitude will determine everything. If someone takes a liking to you they may just take you under their wing.

The best way to meet people in the business is arrive early at shows. Don't get in anyone's way but tell them why you are there - to learn by watching. Take notes. If opportunity permits then introduce yourself and offer to help in any way you can. You might have to run to store for cigs or burgers but that's where you start. They might even let you wipe down cables when the nights done.

Everyone starts at the bottom. That way you learn everything and keep your humility intact. If you are genuine about your desire I think you can find a way in where someone will take a personal interest in you.
Old 22nd May 2015
  #167
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbrunskill View Post
Here's a dumb question - is there a 'standard' monitor set up for a festival type stage?

Say you have a setup with 4 monitors or pairs of monitors across the front, plus say 3 more monitors in a second row for keys, horns and drums. Which auxes would feed which monitor? and if the stage had IEM's for other acts, which auxes would feed them?
With that many mixes you would have a dedicated monitor desk, nowadays probably digital, in which case the bands monitor guy would probably be bringing a show file set up how he likes it, if not then it's basically the house guys preference, which would probably be mono mixes (wedges), followed by stereo mixes (iems) to mirror the layout of a typical analluge desk
Old 22nd May 2015
  #168
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Impacto View Post
what tips do you guys have for me? When I'm setting up a band I ask the keyboard player to put his volume at 3/4 then I adjust the gain. When the band starts a lot of them raise the volume all the way or when I asked them to put it at 3/4 it was really at 1/2 to then later raise it all the way. :-/ This screws me up big time because then the keyboard stands out like crazy until I go in and readjust it. If they want more volume in the monitor I would be more than happy to give it to them. Do they not realize that doing this yes they will have more volume in their monitor but make the band sound bad in foh. Should I use a limiter? Or just a compressor? And if a compressor what ratio? Thanks guys
Unless the player needs to have control over the volume, I'd ask him to set the output to the max.
If you have problem with inconsistency of different patches and can't handle it manually, you can try a compressor with a slow release.
Old 24th May 2015
  #169
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bbrunskill View Post
Here's a dumb question - is there a 'standard' monitor set up for a festival type stage?

Say you have a setup with 4 monitors or pairs of monitors across the front, plus say 3 more monitors in a second row for keys, horns and drums. Which auxes would feed which monitor? and if the stage had IEM's for other acts, which auxes would feed them?
I'd love to say that there is a defacto standard but there isn't. A good answer might be "it depends".

It might be safer to say that there a some default standards that you'll see around the world on festival stages. Some of these can be (but are not limited to) input lists, patching and monitor configurations. But not always.

As an example, here are a few general defaults for a small side-stage at a festival :

From Stage Left to Stage Right : Front Wedge Sends 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 with the Centre on Send 3. Additional Spot Wedges on Sends 6 & 7. Drumfill on Send 8. Sidefill Stacks on Send 9 & 10.

Following that, Sends 11 - 32 might be for stereo in-ear sends. I'd assume the band that uses in-ears at a festival is smart enough to bring their own operator.

So I guess I prefer to keep 1 - 10 for wedges/Fills, then put stereo mixes (in-ears) down the output list. Keep in mind, this will change sometimes with different operators.

Usually the monitor or FOH system engineer should get the last say, as they have to run it, But not always. Sometimes its the production manager after advancing, or discussions with the majority of the acts. At the end of the day, it is HIS/HER stage.

Sometimes if a large "A List" band are headlining, then their techs will get to make that call, and the Production Manager will ask other acts to work around that. Sometimes mid-level bands with large techy setups may influence changes in the layout, as the festival crew won't want to repatch or get "boned" reconfiguring too much for the next changeover.

There might be any number of mitigating factors that influence these decisions. And thats even before you consider the size of the stage. A Main Stage at a Festival? That's a somewhat different beast and may warrant a separate answer.

Cheers

Last edited by ray_subsonic; 24th May 2015 at 03:35 PM..
Old 25th May 2015
  #170
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by Impacto View Post
what tips do you guys have for me? When I'm setting up a band I ask the keyboard player to put his volume at 3/4 then I adjust the gain. When the band starts a lot of them raise the volume all the way or when I asked them to put it at 3/4 it was really at 1/2 to then later raise it all the way. :-/ This screws me up big time because then the keyboard stands out like crazy until I go in and readjust it. If they want more volume in the monitor I would be more than happy to give it to them. Do they not realize that doing this yes they will have more volume in their monitor but make the band sound bad in foh. Should I use a limiter? Or just a compressor? And if a compressor what ratio? Thanks guys
I find a wrist rocket helpful in these situations. Now being serious, this has always been a problem for sound guys. The amateurs don't trust the sound guys and are worried that their 'sound' will get buried in the mix. A comp or limiter wont likely be of much help as in a smaller club, lots of the sound is coming off the stage anyway. All you can really do is to try and have a reasonable conversation with them. If that fails, a wrist rocket and some marbles comes in handy.
Old 20th June 2015
  #171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mixwiz View Post
I find a wrist rocket helpful in these situations. .... If that fails, a wrist rocket and some marbles comes in handy.
Priceless! Now why didn't I think of that?
Old 20th June 2015
  #172
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchy15 View Post
XENGS:

I totally get you, I'm almost 19 now and I've been there too. I've done loads of live audio stuff at my secondary school, which was a great help. I also spent some time at a local radio station, mixing bands and fixing up the place (lying up-side-down underneath a desk soldering mic cables, pulling half a mile of cables off the ceiling, stuff like that). I've been fortunate enough to be working freelance for a local rental company a few times a year. The first 2 years I was only pushing flightcases around, but about 1,5 year ago I started doing monitors and/or FOH on small gigs. When you're with a rental company, there's not so much to worry about, you'll start at the very bottom anyway, you'll work your way up from there if you have the right mentality and attitude.
I had this gear-addiction thing for a few years just like you have it now, you know all the specs and prices and which companies own what gear. It'll end automatically some day when you just feel like you've had enough. I do think it's part of the process though, so don't worry about it.
I am now at a point where this long-time (about 4 years already :O ) hobby of mine is turning into a career. I'm doing my final exams these days and I passed the entrance exams for Art Of Sound at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague (The Netherlands, where I live), so if all goes according to plan, I'll be starting there after the summer.
From all the years I've been messing around, mixing multitracks in Reaper, doing all kinds of stuff related to audio (like making my own cables, learn how to do so!) I haven't only learned a hell lot, I also got to know a lot of people, so I already have a bit of a network and I had a hell of great time doing all that stuff, which is mighty important as well!
Go out there, be eager to learn, try to learn as much as you can, accept that you'll always start at the very bottom and take it as a challenge instead of a loss. I you always give a 110% and try your very best you will meet awesome people, do awesome things, learn a hell lot of stuff and you might even make a bit of money in the process.

Good luck!

Edit: Aisle 6 is just right, do what you have been told, even if you know it's wrong. If there's time, you can point out that you did as they said, but you feel like it could be done better/different/more appropriate. Don't do that if there's no time!
Try to think logically, don't walk in other people's way, ask what to do if you don't know what to do. If instructions aren't clear enough, ask for elaboration, if you're not sure you did something right, ask it. Don't touch things you don't know anything about. Make sure you know exactly what's going on with things like 3-phase power supplies and rigging before working with them.
Listen to a crapload of music, specifically the music you *don't* like! Slowly move towards the edges of the musical world. If you're into softrock, checkout some poprock, then some classic rock, then modern rock, then hardrock, then sludge/stoner, then metal, and so on and so forth. It'll take a while, and you won't like everything, but you'll start appreciating it, which is enough.


Dutchy

My wife and I have traveled to The Netherlands several times. I have friends in Amsterdam and Ghent, Belgium and we try to go every 3-5 years. Anyway, one of our favorite places is the boardwalk in Sverningen (?spelling) near Den Haag. I also found a cool little shop with a bunch of seriously overpriced, vintage guitars and amps called Purple Guitars. I haven't visited that store in about 8 years. I hope it's still there next year when we plan to head back over.

Sorry for the siderail.
Old 22nd June 2015
  #173
Gear Maniac
 
Son of Gafraidh's Avatar
 

Is it OK to ask musicians to get their guitar re-fretted and a better pickup system, or should one just try and deal with what's there? Also, would it be a bit much to supply a quality soundhole pickup (Braggs M1) and insist that musicians use it rather than their built-in system, or even going so far as to have a "house-guitar"?
Old 24th June 2015
  #174
Here for the gear
 

Hi there.
Lemme first confess um new in digital mixing. So um gonna need a good Samaritan to take me step by step on how I can build this circuit using X32 mixer. My equipment is as follows ;
2 powered subwoofers which I use as foh for the bass beat n bass guitar.
2 powered speakers as foh
4 powered speakers used as stage floor monitors
1 powered speaker used as bass guitar monitor
4 drum mics (1 bass mic n 3 other mics)
5 vocalists mics
3 instruments (keyboard, percussion module n lead guitar)
I want the circuit to work in such a way that;
1. The bass kick appears on the subwoofers only
2. The vocalists appear on the foh speakers through the main output channel as dca group
3. The vocalists appear on the monitors as a single group
4. The instruments appear on the foh as a dca group
5. The instruments appear on stage monitors as dca group
6. The bass guitar appear on bass guitar monitor on stage
7. The bass guitar appears on the foh speakers n subwoofers

I want to use mixer's analog input/outputs for this circuit.
Please help a sister out
Old 24th June 2015
  #175
Here for the gear
 

Hi everyone, just saw this thread . Can you still use an iPad 1 or iPad 2 with those new iPad mixers? Been trying to get info on them but still don't know enough to even ask questions lol. Thanks
Old 24th June 2015
  #176
Lives for gear
Bonina,

Your requirements are certainly achievable, but there is great danger in every path of assistance that we may provide to you. You obviously are conversant with the terminology of live sound, and it's comforting to know that you have clearly outlined what you want. Now it's time for you to tell us about your facility with the configuration tools of the X32, and what your timeframe is for getting this ready.

If you have the X32-Edit tool for Mac or PC, then in the comfort and relative silence of your home, you can build the signal routing configuration as needed before plunging into the 'war zone' of a live event. If you have never before done any signal routing work in the X32, then even a complete configuration provided to your specifications might leave you in an untenable situation when the 'bullets start flying'.

This also may be better placed in its own thread, or as a series of PM's to ensure that the intervening clutter won't hamper your success. Reply with an outline of what you already know about running the X32, and we'll take it from there.

Best wishes.
Old 25th June 2015
  #177
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonina View Post
Hi there.
Lemme first confess um new in digital mixing. So um gonna need a good Samaritan to take me step by step on how I can build this circuit using X32 mixer. My equipment is as follows ;
2 powered subwoofers which I use as foh for the bass beat n bass guitar.
2 powered speakers as foh
4 powered speakers used as stage floor monitors
1 powered speaker used as bass guitar monitor
4 drum mics (1 bass mic n 3 other mics)
5 vocalists mics
3 instruments (keyboard, percussion module n lead guitar)
I want the circuit to work in such a way that;
1. The bass kick appears on the subwoofers only
2. The vocalists appear on the foh speakers through the main output channel as dca group
3. The vocalists appear on the monitors as a single group
4. The instruments appear on the foh as a dca group
5. The instruments appear on stage monitors as dca group
6. The bass guitar appear on bass guitar monitor on stage
7. The bass guitar appears on the foh speakers n subwoofers

I want to use mixer's analog input/outputs for this circuit.
Please help a sister out
1. Are you sure that you want to have kick only in subs? You won't get any definition and it wont sound anything like the sound of kick that you hear on the records. You might want to have kick and bass on subs+tops and everything else on tops only. Anyway, if you want separate subs, I'd suggest you to use mono bus for subs and stereo bus for tops.
You'll need a crossover with 3 inputs unless your speakers already have the appropriate filters. You could probably get by by using the filters on the output of the mixer, although you might need to correct the anomalies around the crossover frequency with EQ.
2. Well assign the vocal channels to a DCA and route them to the mix. What's the problem?
3. Not sure what you want. Control the level of all vocals in a monitor send with one knob?
That's not really common, but if you have enough free channels, you could patch the same inputs to two sets of channels and use one for FOH and one for monitors with post fader sends to monitors and DCAs controlling a group of faders.
4. Assign the channels to the mix and DCA. I don't understand what's the problem here.
5. Read no. 3.
6. Use an aux send.
7. It's explained in no. 1.
Old 25th June 2015
  #178
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jetam View Post
1. Are you sure that you want to have kick only in subs? You won't get any definition and it wont sound anything like the sound of kick that you hear on the records. You might want to have kick and bass on subs+tops and everything else on tops only. Anyway, if you want separate subs, I'd suggest you to use mono bus for subs and stereo bus for tops.
You'll need a crossover with 3 inputs unless your speakers already have the appropriate filters. You could probably get by by using the filters on the output of the mixer, although you might need to correct the anomalies around the crossover frequency with EQ.
2. Well assign the vocal channels to a DCA and route them to the mix. What's the problem?
3. Not sure what you want. Control the level of all vocals in a monitor send with one knob?
That's not really common, but if you have enough free channels, you could patch the same inputs to two sets of channels and use one for FOH and one for monitors with post fader sends to monitors and DCAs controlling a group of faders.
4. Assign the channels to the mix and DCA. I don't understand what's the problem here.
5. Read no. 3.
6. Use an aux send.
7. It's explained in no. 1.
Hi Jetam
Originally I used an analog mixer, n i would direct the bass kick to the subwoofers through a group channel. The mix would sound awesome. By so saying I try to point out that I wasn't aware of the crossover stuff. But now that u mentioned it, I think I'll try it out.
Thanx for that channel patching idea, I surely got lot of spare channels.
And lastly, could u or anybody explain to me that input layer button labeled bus master, and how the matrix exactly work. I read somewhere that they are mixes of mixes but I didn't absolutely grasp the idea.
Thanx in advance
Old 25th June 2015
  #179
Here for the gear
 

Impacto,
Can totally relate with you on the volume thing. I always ask performers to "give me all they have" in the volume department. I want all instuments at 100% volume. Most people set it there and dont mess with it. I had one guy that was notorious for keeping his set at half. I tried talking to him. I begged, I pleaded but show after show he kept doing it. I finally had enough and hatched an idea to "make" him conform. We just installed a new foh board and were working out the kinks. During rehearsals I went through my same appeal for everyone to set volume all the way up. Everyone did so, except him. Rehearsals started and I just muted him. The whole band is playing and he is frantically spinning his volume knob up, down, fast, slow, and sideways. I am back in the booth laughing so hard Im crying. Of course the stage is dark and he cant see me. He pulls out his cable, reinserts it, and goes back to spinning his volume nob and this time includes his tone knobs. First song ends and he wants to know why he has no sound. I tell him the new board wont send signal unless it is full volume, and its a new feature on the board. Problem solved. He never tested it by trying to adjust his volume again. He cranks it all the way up every time. He is so trained to it that the other day a guitarists di box went out in the middle of rehearsal, everything came to a halt, and the first thing he did was look at the guitarist and asked if his volume knob was all the way up because if it wasnt it wouldnt pass sound on the new board. Gotta love it!
Old 25th June 2015
  #180
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MediaGary View Post
Bonina,

Your requirements are certainly achievable, but there is great danger in every path of assistance that we may provide to you. You obviously are conversant with the terminology of live sound, and it's comforting to know that you have clearly outlined what you want. Now it's time for you to tell us about your facility with the configuration tools of the X32, and what your timeframe is for getting this ready.

If you have the X32-Edit tool for Mac or PC, then in the comfort and relative silence of your home, you can build the signal routing configuration as needed before plunging into the 'war zone' of a live event. If you have never before done any signal routing work in the X32, then even a complete configuration provided to your specifications might leave you in an untenable situation when the 'bullets start flying'.

This also may be better placed in its own thread, or as a series of PM's to ensure that the intervening clutter won't hamper your success. Reply with an outline of what you already know about running the X32, and we'll take it from there.

Best wishes.
Thanx for your response. It has put some chuckle on my face n I'll tell u y.
Factually I haven't the console with me right now. I've just ordered it n it's on the way. So the experience I got about it is only what I believe I can do.
Using the channel strip I believe I can successfully select n edit any channel to my specific taste, that is give it gain, eq, gate, send it to busses n stuff like that. What still freaks me out is setting the mix to the stage monitors. I want to be able to manipulate voices n instruments separately according to the performers taste, like I mean sometimes the instruments are so high that the vocalists can't hear themselves. And I should mention that my performers aren't professional enough to sort that out themselves; the more of me syndrome.
I also wanna set the monitors in such a way that they'll be independent on the channel faders.
I just downloaded the X32 edit last night n i just could not sleep until about midnight. That's what brought my smile. The other irony is that I want this for military band. That's y I smiled when u mentioned the war zone n flying bullets.
The main concert is in about three weeks time from now, and um expecting the mixer next week, which gives me some two weeks of practice. But with guys like you looking down from my shoulder, I know that's enough time
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump