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What Do You Want to Know About Live Sound But Are Too Afraid To Ask? Dynamic Microphones
Old 27th March 2014
  #91
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edva's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by museAV View Post
I wasn't disagreeing with your suggestion, just offering another option. It's not unusual for the amps and crossover(s) to be located together or for the crossover to be part of DSP in the amplifier. And some amps you may be able to be powered off or muted remotely. There may even be some cases where the crossover is part of the amplifier(s) and enabled by a hardware switch or a plug-in module. It's always good to have options.
This is true, and yet another option to test speakers is to unplug them at the box while running a test tone, if they are accessible.
Old 29th March 2014
  #92
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Forget 11, I want 12!

WOW monocluster, thanks for starting this thread and thanks for all the great replies throughout!!Here's my WDYWTKALSBATATA question: I'm a one man band,singing drummer over pre-recorded tracks. My gear: 2-Wharfedale Titan 15's,2-JBL MR 925 15"s,2-Cerwin Vega 18" subs,2-Crown CE 2000 amps, 1-QSC RMX 1350 amp and a Mackie 1620 mixer w/ firewire,Lexicon MX 200,DOD vocal fx, ART HQ 15 eq, and a DBX 234 x-ovr. The pre-recorded tracks will be on cd.The club ( I'm hoping for a weekly residency) will hold between 100-300 w/ a super dead stage and a low acoustic tile ceiling/linoleum tile floor.I'm thinking to get the drums to punch through I'll need to get more 15"s.Is that correct? Sorry for my scattered way of writing.Had to switch to decaf.........To get an idea of my sound the tunes are at Voltzjammer. Catch Me A Doll and Failed Chemistry are a few good one's. Thanks again for the great thread and site.Chipp aka Voltzjammer.
Old 29th March 2014
  #93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by room temp View Post
I'm thinking to get the drums to punch through I'll need to get more 15"s.Is that correct?
No...More loudspeakers will probably make your system louder but that's it.

Getting the drums to 'punch through' (the mix) will depend a great deal on how you play and how the drums are mixed relative to the other tracks.
Old 29th March 2014
  #94
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edva's Avatar
and also how they are tuned, and mic'd.
Old 30th March 2014
  #95
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mojo filters's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by room temp View Post
I'm thinking to get the drums to punch through I'll need to get more 15"s.Is that correct?
Can I ask what made you think this might be correct? Addressing that issue may help you get closer to being correct in the future.
Old 30th March 2014
  #96
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room temp, how do you use the JBLs and Wharfedales, is one pair for mains and one for monitors or do you use both for mains? If you use both for mains then I'd say you might actually gain by cutting back to just one pair rather than adding to what is already two completely different models of 15" woofer full range boxes.
Old 31st March 2014
  #97
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Thanks your advice and questions! museAV, I'm using the Crown/Wharfedale combo for the pre-recorded tracks and the Crown/Cerwin Vega,QSC/JBL combo for the drums. I have an Audio Centron CM-15H for my monitor.Maybe I'll do a dry run at the venue during the day and see what sounds best. I'm a loooooong time drummer but a noob soundguy so thanks for your advice and patience !Voltzjammer.https://voltzjammer1.bandcamp.com/tr...iled-chemistry
Old 2nd April 2014
  #98
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Some basic questions regarding Monitoring: Everybody who has to mix monitors from FOH should be aware of the problem...
Do you guys have a certain way to set up on-stage monitoring while doing the front mix?

Do you get all the signals out on the front first and then care about the monitors? Or do you care for each signal separately and bring it to the monitors/PA same time?

And then there's always compromises going on like, I don't want to hear the monitors in the audience room but I want every musician to hear her/himself. I don't want feedback of course, but I don't want to kill too much freq in order to make the monitor still sound OK for the musicians...

What in your opinion is the key to good monitor sound?

Looking forward to hear your suggestions and experiences.
Old 3rd April 2014
  #99
Gear Nut
 

Davie, Im no expert, but heres how I handle my monitors.

I do festivals that have multiple bands playing one after the other. When I soundcheck the first band, I try to adjust the gain on each mic/instrument so that it hits a certain input level on my meters, say -12db. So extra hot signals I may cut the gain til the meters read -12dB, and softer signals Ill raise the gain to get it up to -12dB. This evens out all of my channel inputs, and for me makes things easier to work with. Ill then mix the FOH to something that sounds decent, then mix my monitor mixes (I use 2) to something decent. Show now begins and the first band plays.

Now when the second band comes up, Ill soundcheck each channel again, and again adjust the gain on each channel so that the meters read -12db. Now, since all my inputs are at -12dB, just like the first band, my previous FOH and monitor mixes should be at least close to where I want them. Of course with every new band I have to tweak a little here and there, but at least Im close to start off, which is important because I never get a ton of time to tear down one band and setup the next... so speed and efficiency are key.

As far as controlling monitor volume to avoid bleeding into the FOH, I think key is controlling stage volume. Guitarists tend to like to blast their amps, so you have to turn monitors louder so they can be heard over the amps. That seems to be my biggest problem, guitar amps too loud and I always have to struggle to get people to turn them down. It would be nice to have guitar amps on stands so they can point to the guitarists ears instead of at their knees, then they can hear them better without blasting them. Drums can also be a problem, as you cant just turn acoustic drums down, so monitors have to be loud enough that they can be heard over the drums. At my church, we have the drums behind a plexiglass cage to control their volume a little better.

Hope that helps!

Quote:
Originally Posted by davie View Post
Some basic questions regarding Monitoring: Everybody who has to mix monitors from FOH should be aware of the problem...
Do you guys have a certain way to set up on-stage monitoring while doing the front mix?

Do you get all the signals out on the front first and then care about the monitors? Or do you care for each signal separately and bring it to the monitors/PA same time?

And then there's always compromises going on like, I don't want to hear the monitors in the audience room but I want every musician to hear her/himself. I don't want feedback of course, but I don't want to kill too much freq in order to make the monitor still sound OK for the musicians...

What in your opinion is the key to good monitor sound?

Looking forward to hear your suggestions and experiences.
Old 4th April 2014
  #100
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Thanks musicman78
Having input gains at one level is a good approach I think. It gives you something constant you can work with. This will work for a lot of scenarios, but sometimes I think it won't...

Take the guitar tube amp f.e. which only sounds good after you hit a certain level and a guitarist who likes to work with feedback.
I always but the amps on the side, so they don't bleed in the FOH too hard, but in small venues even that doesn't really help. That's the time I really would like to put the amps backstage.

Another problem I see with having all input gains same level is when you want to have the faders at unity to be able to make fine adjustments in the mix (talking of analogue consoles). So if I set all the inputs to the same level it could be that the front mix suffers by doing so, because with some signals you might not be able to make these fine adjustments.

Fun fact: Yesterday I did showrehearsals in a small venue. The monitors were turned off at first and the musicians were like, 'Hey man it sounds awesome on stage'. Thats when I realized that maybe you shouldn't always start with a basic monitormix but with nothing at all and then add the signals the musicians miss. This can avoid that the monitors get too loud on stage right from the start. I ended up with vocals on the monitors and that was basically it. The drumfill was the only mix which had some more signals and was slightly louder.
Old 4th April 2014
  #101
Gear Nut
 

Hey Davie,

In your tube amp example, you are correct it is a problem that if a musician brings up a 100w tube half stack, hell have to crank it loud to get a good sound. With my method, I would have to cut the gain a lot to get the input level the same as the rest of my inputs (in my example, -12dB). Then I know the signal is also getting sent to my monitors at a level that is close to good. I think the loud stage volume is a separate issue, since it will definitely bleed into the FOH and the guitarist will want his monitor super loud to compete with it. I agree with you that getting the amp facing away from the crowd is a good idea if its possible.

In your second example, I dunno... after leveling out all my inputs and setting up my mix, I never find that I end up with any faders set so low that I dont have enough room to make the adjustments I want. But maybe I will come across this problem someday.

I have watched some tutorials by experienced sound guys that do something similar to what you describe, they set all their faders to unity, and adjust the gains until they have a mix they are relatively happy with and adjust from there. Very backwards from my method. But again, I consider myself a novice sound engineer so maybe theres something I am missing. Maybe its different when you have a separate monitor engineer mixing monitors from the side of the stage and I dont have to worry about it. Anyways it has worked well for me so just thought Id share it. I get so much great advice on this forum that if I can contribute back in any way i try to!

Quote:
Originally Posted by davie View Post
Thanks musicman78
Having input gains at one level is a good approach I think. It gives you something constant you can work with. This will work for a lot of scenarios, but sometimes I think it won't...

Take the guitar tube amp f.e. which only sounds good after you hit a certain level and a guitarist who likes to work with feedback.
I always but the amps on the side, so they don't bleed in the FOH too hard, but in small venues even that doesn't really help. That's the time I really would like to put the amps backstage.

Another problem I see with having all input gains same level is when you want to have the faders at unity to be able to make fine adjustments in the mix (talking of analogue consoles). So if I set all the inputs to the same level it could be that the front mix suffers by doing so, because with some signals you might not be able to make these fine adjustments.

Fun fact: Yesterday I did showrehearsals in a small venue. The monitors were turned off at first and the musicians were like, 'Hey man it sounds awesome on stage'. Thats when I realized that maybe you shouldn't always start with a basic monitormix but with nothing at all and then add the signals the musicians miss. This can avoid that the monitors get too loud on stage right from the start. I ended up with vocals on the monitors and that was basically it. The drumfill was the only mix which had some more signals and was slightly louder.
Old 4th April 2014
  #102
Gear Nut
 

Hey guys, I could use some help. This question may belong in behringers x32 forums, but for 3 weeks now I have been trying to get their forum moderators to approve my registration so I can post and still no luck!

So before my x32 I was using alesis 3630 compressors. With this compressor I could meter both the input and the output of the unit... so I knew based on the looking at the two if I was squashing the signal so much that I needed to add some makeup gain.

Also, in the software tools Ive used to record with, the compressors also allow me to meter both the input and output of the compressor so I could adjust my makeup gain properly.

On my x32, there is a meter for input level, gain reduction, but as far as I can tell theres no way to view the compressor output. Is there a better way to know how much makeup gain to add?

Thanks for any hep! - Anthony
Old 4th April 2014
  #103
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Thanks again for your help
I think i will try your method next time!!
Old 4th April 2014
  #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musicmann78 View Post
Hey guys, I could use some help. This question may belong in behringers x32 forums, but for 3 weeks now I have been trying to get their forum moderators to approve my registration so I can post and still no luck!

So before my x32 I was using alesis 3630 compressors. With this compressor I could meter both the input and the output of the unit... so I knew based on the looking at the two if I was squashing the signal so much that I needed to add some makeup gain.

Also, in the software tools Ive used to record with, the compressors also allow me to meter both the input and output of the compressor so I could adjust my makeup gain properly.

On my x32, there is a meter for input level, gain reduction, but as far as I can tell theres no way to view the compressor output. Is there a better way to know how much makeup gain to add?

Thanks for any hep! - Anthony
Well, theoretically on a compressor, input - GR = output. So, while a meter to show you the post-compressor signal level is convenient, it's not strictly necessary; an indicated nominal input of -4dBFS, minus indicated gain reduction of 6dB (for instance, produced by a threshold of -16dBFS and a 2:1 ratio), gives an output signal level of -10dBFS. If you want that level to be -6dBFS to normalize this channel's peaks with others, then just add +4dB makeup gain.

I don't own an X32 and haven't paid that close attention to the metering structure, but my guess is that your best indicator of the output volume is the meter for the channel in the fader bank. Each channel in either bank has its own level meter, much like quality analog boards. On analogs, these meters are virtually always post-insert, post-EQ, pre-fader, so they're basically showing you the channel level you'd get with the channel unmuted and the fader at unity. All things being equal, I'd expect the bank meters on the X32 to show me the same, especially since they have additional LEDs specifically to indicate that compression or gating are currently affecting the channel level.

If what I am supposing is true (you can confirm it more easily than I can by just running some noise into a channel at -6dB, then pulling the threshold way down and the ratio way up and seeing if the channel meter behaves appropriately), then your input meter is the head amp meter (and/or the meter in the "Dyn" page of the channel display), and your output meter is the fader strip's meter.
Old 4th April 2014
  #105
Gear Nut
 

Thanks Liko. I guess I can just figure out how much makeup gain I want to add based on how much GR is being applied. I guess I just like looking at a meter too.

On the x32, the fader meter shows the same information as the input/head amp meter. I ran some signal into a channel and crushed it with the compressor and the fader meter was not affected. Oh well Ill live, but if anyone knows something I am missing please let me know thanks! - Anthony

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liko View Post
Well, theoretically on a compressor, input - GR = output. So, while a meter to show you the post-compressor signal level is convenient, it's not strictly necessary; an indicated nominal input of -4dBFS, minus indicated gain reduction of 6dB (for instance, produced by a threshold of -16dBFS and a 2:1 ratio), gives an output signal level of -10dBFS. If you want that level to be -6dBFS to normalize this channel's peaks with others, then just add +4dB makeup gain.

I don't own an X32 and haven't paid that close attention to the metering structure, but my guess is that your best indicator of the output volume is the meter for the channel in the fader bank. Each channel in either bank has its own level meter, much like quality analog boards. On analogs, these meters are virtually always post-insert, post-EQ, pre-fader, so they're basically showing you the channel level you'd get with the channel unmuted and the fader at unity. All things being equal, I'd expect the bank meters on the X32 to show me the same, especially since they have additional LEDs specifically to indicate that compression or gating are currently affecting the channel level.

If what I am supposing is true (you can confirm it more easily than I can by just running some noise into a channel at -6dB, then pulling the threshold way down and the ratio way up and seeing if the channel meter behaves appropriately), then your input meter is the head amp meter (and/or the meter in the "Dyn" page of the channel display), and your output meter is the fader strip's meter.
Old 5th April 2014
  #106
Gear Nut
Quote:
Originally Posted by room temp View Post
My gear: 2-Wharfedale Titan 15's,2-JBL MR 925 15"s,2-Cerwin Vega 18" subs,2-Crown CE 2000 amps, 1-QSC RMX 1350 amp and a Mackie 1620 mixer w/ firewire,Lexicon MX 200,DOD vocal fx, ART HQ 15 eq, and a DBX 234 x-ovr.
I suggest you sell the Crown CE-2000 amps immediately and get something like a QSC amps. It is next to impossible to get the CE amps repaired.
Old 6th April 2014
  #107
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davie View Post
Fun fact: Yesterday I did showrehearsals in a small venue. The monitors were turned off at first and the musicians were like, 'Hey man it sounds awesome on stage'. Thats when I realized that maybe you shouldn't always start with a basic monitormix but with nothing at all and then add the signals the musicians miss. This can avoid that the monitors get too loud on stage right from the start. I ended up with vocals on the monitors and that was basically it. The drumfill was the only mix which had some more signals and was slightly louder.
I think a common misconception by some musicians is that they should hear on stage what the audience hears when monitors are actually intended to provide them just what they need to perform. One tip I like is that when a musician asks for something regarding their monitors always try to think in terms of what you can turn down or take out of their mix. Think whether "more me" can be addressed by sending them less of everything else.

I think you will find some people who handle the monitors first and others who address the house sound first. Since I believe the show is for the audience and since the house system often affects what the performers hear on stage, I fall into the latter category, but also look at it as an iterative process tat can require some tweaking back and forth after both are initially set.
Old 7th April 2014
  #108
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What tools would i need to do setup a hip-hop show(not completely backing track dependent so I don't need like super DJ controls just basic live output from a DAW or something) what would I need without having to give the guy a CD, how do you output from a computer or something?

Do i need a mixer board?(would this output to the venues board?) If there is a sound guy on site at the venue is it respectful to request that you have complete control beside the vocal?

I'd love to be doing this with friends at school(we all love doing home concerts rap,rock anything ) but so many times (only) rap shows at venues and its really embarrassing when the wrong tracks go off the CD player freezes and it just ruins the vibe, so I'd be helpful if I could at least be controlling the output directly from my spot rather then depending on a CD player that may have no been cleaned or updated since the 80's...
At a house show I can just hook up my 3.5m output to a speaker and monitor in the daw but at a Venue it seems more complicated

I'm like the only person who knows anything about sound in my school so its up to me to save everyone x)
Old 7th April 2014
  #109
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I would use an interface.

Lets say you have 4 channels in your DAW like bass, drums (Stereo) and synth. So you would need 4 outputs on your interface. In a gig setup these would go into DIs and from there to the PA and on your monitors.
Old 11th April 2014
  #110
Gear Head
 

when if ever should you pan spoken word? like speeches or what not.
Old 11th April 2014
  #111
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PRofeshunAL View Post
when if ever should you pan spoken word? like speeches or what not.
There are a couple situations when I pan just vocals.

1) The lecturer/presenter isn't the most intelligent and walks in front of one of the speakers with an open microphone; immediately pan to the opposite side to avoid potential feedback. (this isn't often, but its happened hah)

2) If I'm working a panel, or something with multiple mics, for this example lets say five. I'll pan the farthest stage right/house left mic mid-far left, next one in, medium left, middle mic stays centered, next mic slightly right, then mid-right on the last mic. When your ear hears a sound coming in more loudly on one side than the other, it assumes the sound is located in that direction and you'll naturally look over there. It really just helps clean up panels and localizes where the sound comes from for the audience. It doesn't take a lot of panning to make this effect work.

3) A lot of events are one podium with a mic on the far side of the stage, a large projection screen at the rear of the stage, and a few videos or powerpoints with audio. Following the same sound localization thought train, I'll pan the voice slighty towards whatever side the podium is on. Just to trick brains into looking over there. The video audio gets center panned, since the video is center stage.

Just my $0.02 on panning.
Old 15th April 2014
  #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by museAV View Post
I think a common misconception by some musicians is that they should hear on stage what the audience hears when monitors are actually intended to provide them just what they need to perform. One tip I like is that when a musician asks for something regarding their monitors always try to think in terms of what you can turn down or take out of their mix. Think whether "more me" can be addressed by sending them less of everything else.

I think you will find some people who handle the monitors first and others who address the house sound first. Since I believe the show is for the audience and since the house system often affects what the performers hear on stage, I fall into the latter category, but also look at it as an iterative process tat can require some tweaking back and forth after both are initially set.
Both philosophies are totally valid. I think these decisions are environment-dependent, and either way, as you say, there will be some tweaking of each side of the system given changes to the other. In smaller venues where stage volume is high (acoustic drums, large stage amps), it might be preferable to build the monitor mix first, giving the talent the necessary volume of vocals, keyboards, etc, then building a house mix based on what isn't already coming from the stage. However, if stage volume is low (E-drums and DIed or low-wattage instrument amps) in a similar space, it could make more sense to build the house mix, then supplement the performers' stage mix with what they're not getting any other way.

I also think the question is becoming moot as more and more groups and productions invest in IEMs. The window where wedges are seen as superior to IEMs seems to be shrinking rapidly; in small venues, especially lively places not originally designed for amplified sound (such as houses of worship), some form of headphone monitoring is a virtual necessity on top of removing amps and acoustic drums, to keep stage volume manageable. On the other side of the spectrum, in large arena gigs, IEMs are needed for their dual purpose as hearing protection, as even the volume of the raw stage wash, without wedges, could be at a level where ear plugs are a smart idea.

The remaining situations where wedges are the only monitoring option are mainly auditorium-style setups, specifically designed for high SPL, and/or for groups too large or inexperienced with pro audio for IEMs to be an option. Even in those situations, they seem to be regarded as a necessary evil; many such groups I just described, like choirs, simply get used to singing into nothingness and depend on direct sound of their fellow performers for blend and balance.
Old 15th April 2014
  #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musicmann78 View Post
Davie, Im no expert, but heres how I handle my monitors.

I do festivals that have multiple bands playing one after the other. When I soundcheck the first band, I try to adjust the gain on each mic/instrument so that it hits a certain input level on my meters, say -12db. So extra hot signals I may cut the gain til the meters read -12dB, and softer signals Ill raise the gain to get it up to -12dB. This evens out all of my channel inputs, and for me makes things easier to work with. Ill then mix the FOH to something that sounds decent, then mix my monitor mixes (I use 2) to something decent. Show now begins and the first band plays.

Now when the second band comes up, Ill soundcheck each channel again, and again adjust the gain on each channel so that the meters read -12db. Now, since all my inputs are at -12dB, just like the first band, my previous FOH and monitor mixes should be at least close to where I want them. Of course with every new band I have to tweak a little here and there, but at least Im close to start off, which is important because I never get a ton of time to tear down one band and setup the next... so speed and efficiency are key.
Just one thing, for other readers; -12dB isn't always the best option. That's a reasonable number for digital equipment, where the scale is calibrated to dBFS where 0dB is clipping. Most analog boards, though, are scaled in dBV or dBu, and are rated for a nominal +4dBu output, so the clip level is well into the positive dB numbers, usually somewhere between +15 and +30dB. For those boards, the manufacturers typically recommend setting each channel's level to peak between +6 and +10dB, and sustain somewhere around or just below 0dB.
Old 16th April 2014
  #114
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Great topic idea for the N00bs like me!

I often play in an acoustic duo (guitar/mando or guitar/guitar) with vocals. When unable to use a single LD condenser, I have tried the two 57 route, and one 57 one dpa 4099 clipped on. I still manage to get feedback in the monitors, no matter where the placement. I know the DPA is supposed to be pretty feedback resistant, but I haven't found this to be true. Any suggestions, and thanks for no judging me (in public, at least!).
Old 16th April 2014
  #115
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by guitarua View Post
Great topic idea for the N00bs like me!

I often play in an acoustic duo (guitar/mando or guitar/guitar) with vocals. When unable to use a single LD condenser, I have tried the two 57 route, and one 57 one dpa 4099 clipped on. I still manage to get feedback in the monitors, no matter where the placement. I know the DPA is supposed to be pretty feedback resistant, but I haven't found this to be true. Any suggestions, and thanks for no judging me (in public, at least!).
First of all, when you say no matter the placement, are you talking about microphone placement and monitor placement? Never used a 4099, but for a 57, if you look at the pickup pattern, the dead spot, or the direction that the microphone is picking up sound the least, is directly behind the mic. So your monitor should be placed directly behind the mic to have it pickup the least sound from the monitor which will casue feedback.

Second, do you happen to have a graphic EQ for your monitor mix? With a graphic EQ, you can notch out any trouble frequencies in your monitors... a process called "ringing out". Before your show, you basically start raising the volume of your monitors until you hear feedback, and use your EQ to notch that feedback frequency down. You then continue to raise the monitor volume until you hear the next feedback frequency, then notch that out, etc.

Hope that helps!
Old 16th April 2014
  #116
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musicmann78 View Post
First of all, when you say no matter the placement, are you talking about microphone placement and monitor placement? Never used a 4099, but for a 57, if you look at the pickup pattern, the dead spot, or the direction that the microphone is picking up sound the least, is directly behind the mic. So your monitor should be placed directly behind the mic to have it pickup the least sound from the monitor which will casue feedback.

Second, do you happen to have a graphic EQ for your monitor mix? With a graphic EQ, you can notch out any trouble frequencies in your monitors... a process called "ringing out". Before your show, you basically start raising the volume of your monitors until you hear feedback, and use your EQ to notch that feedback frequency down. You then continue to raise the monitor volume until you hear the next feedback frequency, then notch that out, etc.

Hope that helps!
Thanks musicmann!

That is part of the problem, no GEQ on monitors.
Old 17th April 2014
  #117
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by guitarua View Post
Thanks musicmann!

That is part of the problem, no GEQ on monitors.
Another thing to keep in mind about placement of a mic on an acoustic guitar, is the way sound from the monitor can reflect off the top back into the mic. Depending on volume levels, it can sometimes be better to put the monitor behind you, so your body can block and absorb the sound before it gets back to the mic. Just don't move out of the way without the mute on!

Then, of course, there are always pickups…..

Louis
Old 17th April 2014
  #118
Gear Nut
 

+1 on the pickups. miking guitars is way more prone to feedback, acoustic electric guitars are much easier to work with. an acoustic guitar is a pretty quiet instrument, so if youre miking it you have to have the gain up pretty high to get a decent signal to your console. raising the gain that high will usually make your mic feedback more easily. if you gig a lot, might be worth it to save up for a nice acoustic electric, or research on a good pickup that you can install on your current guitar.

i do like the sound of a miked acoustic guitar, when i record i always mic my acoustic guitars because i feel like it captures the more natural sound of the instrument. would love the same sound in a live situation, but as mentioned above its just very difficult.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lschwart View Post
Another thing to keep in mind about placement of a mic on an acoustic guitar, is the way sound from the monitor can reflect off the top back into the mic. Depending on volume levels, it can sometimes be better to put the monitor behind you, so your body can block and absorb the sound before it gets back to the mic. Just don't move out of the way without the mute on!

Then, of course, there are always pickups…..

Louis
Old 17th April 2014
  #119
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Wyllys's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by musicmann78 View Post
+1 on the pickups. miking guitars is way more prone to feedback, acoustic electric guitars are much easier to work with. an acoustic guitar is a pretty quiet instrument, so if youre miking it you have to have the gain up pretty high to get a decent signal to your console. raising the gain that high will usually make your mic feedback more easily. if you gig a lot, might be worth it to save up for a nice acoustic electric, or research on a good pickup that you can install on your current guitar.

i do like the sound of a miked acoustic guitar, when i record i always mic my acoustic guitars because i feel like it captures the more natural sound of the instrument. would love the same sound in a live situation, but as mentioned above its just very difficult.
AGood pick-up system with a matching preamp can be a nice setup.

But I would take issue with the rest of your post.

Acoustic guitars can put out lots of sound...IF the player is capable. I used to play street music and had no trouble projecting a ton of sound out of a dreadnought model. When playing into a mic at that level I would always see sound people reaching for the trim pot to turn it DOWN because the input was too hot on an ACOUSTIC guitar.

So it's as much a question of the player as the instrument. Look at the guitar players on the Grand Ol' Opry. Thet play into SDC's with loud monitors just fine.

Loudest sound at the mic wins, so you just have to PROJECT.

And a mic will sound better than your average built-in commercial pickup. The real problem is wimpy pickers.
Old 19th April 2014
  #120
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyllys View Post
AGood pick-up system with a matching preamp can be a nice setup.

But I would take issue with the rest of your post.

Acoustic guitars can put out lots of sound...IF the player is capable. I used to play street music and had no trouble projecting a ton of sound out of a dreadnought model. When playing into a mic at that level I would always see sound people reaching for the trim pot to turn it DOWN because the input was too hot on an ACOUSTIC guitar.

So it's as much a question of the player as the instrument. Look at the guitar players on the Grand Ol' Opry. Thet play into SDC's with loud monitors just fine.

Loudest sound at the mic wins, so you just have to PROJECT.

And a mic will sound better than your average built-in commercial pickup. The real problem is wimpy pickers.

I agree. The other issue is that I have a couple of guitar I won't put electronics in. Too old and fragile and not worth it for the sound they will reproduce.

Any suggestions on SDC that suppress feedback very well?

Thanks all who have chimed in! All the info is great.
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