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Benefits of splitting and adding a second antenna on a Shure PSM 300 IEM?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Benefits of splitting and adding a second antenna on a Shure PSM 300 IEM?

Total noob question but here goes...

I noticed that our Shure BLX24R mic receiver has two antennas. We have one antenna on the front of the rack and the other on the back. The unit is designed with two antennas to receive the wireless mic signal and it works great. No questions regarding that.

Here's the question: Our PSM 300 IEM transmitter has a single antenna output that we mount on the front of the rack. I was wondering if there's any benefit if I passively split that single antenna signal with a BNC splitter after coming out of the PSM 300 so that it's connected to two antennas (one in the front of the rack and one in the back).
Old 3 weeks ago
  #2
Lives for gear
 

Just looked it up, the P3T transmitter only puts out 30mW. You should get a UHF amplifier:
https://www.amazon.com/Skywalker-Sig.../dp/B008UDF55E

While you're at it, you can upgrade your antenna with a log periodic antenna (aka Yagi) like this one:
https://www.ebay.ca/itm/LP0410-Log-P...d/283697165809

You'll have to go from BNC ro coax to SMA connectors, but it offers the same benefits as about $500 in Shure brand units, just not as robust. You'll definitely need a case for that antenna.

To answer your question, splitting to two antennas won't help because of the signal loss at the splitter. Amplify instead.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AC2SPL View Post
To answer your question, splitting to two antennas won't help because of the signal loss at the splitter. Amplify instead.
It's even worse than that. Sending the same signal from two antennas will create multi-path (receiver picks up two signals with a slight time difference between them). It's the RF equivalent of audio comb filtering.

Geoff
Old 2 weeks ago
  #4
Gear Nut
 

There is no benefit to adding a second antenna to the IEM transmitters and it would likely lead to many other issues.
Your BLX system has what is called dual diversity. this means that the receiver has two antennas usually labeled A and B and it will automatically switch back and forth between A and B depending on which has the strongest signal. It does this continually so as the transmitter moves around the receiver has two options. this is one of the reasons you want to spread your antennas out by at least six feet whenever possible.

With a wireless in ear system the signal flow is reversed. You are transmitting out from your rack unit to the beltpacks receivers and as the beltpacks so small it is not cost effective to use dual diversity in them. The top of the line Shure PSM1000 wireless in ear systems do use dual diversity but they are the only ones I have come across that do.

If you want to learn more about this stuff sure has a bunch of great videos on their website and sennhieser is doing a lot of webinars right now for free.
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