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Normal to cut so much low mids and lows?
Old 1 week ago
  #1
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Normal to cut so much low mids and lows?

When observing a FOH mixer at a church I noticed that he had a ton of low mids carved out and lows in general that coming from a studio engineer like myself seems absurd. It didn’t sound particularly harsh or anything, but wasn’t sure if that was the best approach to mixing live sound or if that was normal to be doing that. Any thoughts on this?
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Gear Maniac
 

if it sounds great then so be it...
Old 1 week ago
  #3
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avare's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lucasmusic View Post
When observing a FOH mixer at a church I noticed that he had a ton of low mids carved out and lows in general that coming from a studio engineer like myself seems absurd.
Do you mix with your ears or eyes? On a slightly more serious note, when doing live voice I usually use a 12 dB/oct HPF at as high as 200 Hz. It improves intelligibility significantly. Basicall just touching the fundamental and/or reducing proximity effect(AKA mud) significantly.

As started off with the replies, if it sounds good it is good.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Gear Nut
 

I also cut alot of those frequenties when doing live sound.

There is always alot of build up in those frequenties due to the PA/room accoustics.

In most studio recordings i also cut those frequenties, but to a lesser degree.
Old 1 week ago
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucasmusic View Post
When observing a FOH mixer at a church I noticed that he had a ton of low mids carved out and lows in general that coming from a studio engineer like myself seems absurd. It didn’t sound particularly harsh or anything, but wasn’t sure if that was the best approach to mixing live sound or if that was normal to be doing that. Any thoughts on this?
Maybe that system sounded bottom heavy in that room...the fact that it didn't really sound bad suggests a low-end imbalance.

And yes, if it sounds good it's good.
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Also, on cheap-to-middling consoles, brightening usually doesn't sound so great. With voices, especially.
Old 1 week ago
  #7
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how much low cut on specific channels is needed depends much on system properties and alignment: many system engineers these days shoot for a rather severe lf tilt, often on the request of foh engineers...
another thing to consider is that many small to medium venues show strong room modes in the lower register, very often in the 80-120hz range.
proximity effect of directional mics which typically get used in live sound can add to lf build-up.

now there are different stategies how to deal with this: absorbers/bass traps are mostly not an option in live sound. physically re-arranging subs (if they were not placed in optimum ways) can help a lot (remember that placing subs is about pattern control) but unfortunately, this often isn't an option either so what's left is:

- using lots of low cuts on mics, preamps and channel eqs or on subgroups
- route/mix lf to dedicated outputs (subwoofers) only
- use house eq to tame lf
- re-align or actually re-balance the system...

(my channel eq default setting uses a low cut and gets applied to most any channels or subgroups when recording/broadcasting at the same time as mixing live on the same desk - and yes, the house eq/controller settings may look bad and fr may measure even worse: no problem as long as it sounds good!)
Old 1 week ago
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucasmusic View Post
When observing a FOH mixer at a church I noticed that he had a ton of low mids carved out and lows in general that coming from a studio engineer like myself seems absurd. It didn’t sound particularly harsh or anything, but wasn’t sure if that was the best approach to mixing live sound or if that was normal to be doing that. Any thoughts on this?
Do you mean specifically on the mains graphic eq? Positive it wasn't the monitor graphic eq?
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