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LD Systems Curv 500 vs Turbosound Inspire IP2000 Mixers (Digital)
Old 27th December 2016
  #1
Here for the gear
 

LD Systems Curv 500 vs Turbosound Inspire IP2000

Hi All,

I'm a guitarist playing in a 4 piece classic rock band and I'm about to plunk down for my own PA system. I've done a lot of reading and studying with various products but I would really appreciate some opinions on what I've come up with.

Firstly my requirements:

1. $2500 - $3000 budget
2. System needs to be as small and compact (and light!) as possible so I can transport easily.
3. Must sound clear and be able to get relatively loud (we are playing small 100-150 ppl bars/pubs).
4. Need to be able to mix from anywhere.
5. Easy/quick to setup and tear down.

In my research I've boiled it down to 2 speaker systems and 2 mixers:

For the speakers:

LD Systems Curv 500 PS

Turbosound Inspire IP2000

I've heard a SINGLE Curv 500 setup and I was blown away by how loud and clear it was. I wasn't thrilled with the onboard mixer but I'm not really looking to use it much. It was extremely lightweight. Really, it's only down side was that it was $300 more for the unit and an additional $200 for the bags to carry it.

I have NOT heard the Turbosound but have read in numerous places that it's sound is great and loud as well. From the specs, it appears the SPL is higher on the Curv but I'm not sure how that would sound in real life vs each other.

The one big negative on the Turbosound is the weight of the sub unit, it's in the neighborhood of 50lbs. I believe the Curb sub is around 30lbs.

The big positive for the Turbosound is the price.


For the mixer:

I'm torn between the Behringer X AIR16 and the X18 (desktop version). I can't blow the budget on the X AIR18 (Air 16 = 399 X18 = 499 X AIR18 = 699).

Other than the shape of the unit of the X18 vs. the X AIR16, what am I missing between the 2 units?

My pros for the X18 are 18-xlr inputs and 18 channel recording. While I doubt I would need more the 16 inputs provided by the X AIR16, I like the not having to worry about not having enough. The 18 channel recording is the seller for the X18 but the size and ability to place it on the stage without getting stepped on make the X AIR 16 seem to me more durable.

My drummer has a good mic set and I have direct out on head or can mic my cab. The bass can go direct out from his amp or mic as well as the other guitarist. I was planning on running everything through the mixer and trying to get a truly balanced sound.

We're not playing large venues and if we did and needed something bigger, I would look to rent a professional sound company to do it for us for those cases.

Any help/suggestions is MUCH appreciated! Thanks in advance.
Old 27th December 2016
  #2
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Wyllys's Avatar
 

This is going to sound harsh, but it is totally honest.

The Turbosound is total junk. Apart from these types of single-singer/songwriter coffeehouse toys not being suitable for or capable of handling live ensemble sound, the Turbosound is structurally weak to the point of being a bad joke. The column essentially just balances on the sub with no really substantial connection to prevent it from just tipping over and snapping off if bumped. How do I know?

I bought one on spec. When it came I unpacked and set it up. Without even firing it up I could see that if my cat bumped it, disaster would result. I sent it back to Sweetwater. My rep called to follow up and when I told him of the weak design he just sighed and said he knew, but being in a sales position he really couldn't warn me off ahead of time...

He was nice enough to pick up the return shipping since I'm a long-time customer, but I wouldn't expect that to happen for everyone.

If you really want to go with one of these column on a sub things, be VERY particular about the robustness of the mounting. Don't expect any of them to be half as loud as a single powered 12" from EV, JBL, QSC or the like. And yes, the built in "mixers" are pretty much a joke for anything more than a single user. These are "personal PA's" and nothing more.
Old 27th December 2016
  #3
KEL
Lives for gear
 

That's a slim budget for decent new stuff. There are plenty of good active cabinets for sale used.
If I was doing this from scratch, knowing what I know now, I'd probably get two Yamaha DSR 12s and a mixer first, then add a subwoofer, then another later. OR Qsc KW152/122

A subwoofer that you'd actually want to use will not be 30lbs or even 50.

When mixing sound from the stage, I like faders and knobs. For adjusting out in the venue, a tablet is fine. I like quick access to faders, monitor sends and effects...reach over and adjust, often a few faders at a time
Old 27th December 2016
  #4
KEL
Lives for gear
 

The "column things" I've heard and like we're the RCF, but they're not inexpensive
Old 27th December 2016
  #5
Gear Maniac
 

The RCF versions are much better than the those first mentioned, JBL, Bose, etc. I have installed these in small churches, volunteer civic theaters, etc. Never a problem and they sound better.
Old 27th December 2016
  #6
Here for the gear
 

Thanks Wyllys. I was thinking the same thing when I saw the Turbosounds. I didn't like the quick lock mechanism. Have you seen the the LD Curv 500? It uses a pole into the sub unit and cable to the satellite. The satellites are made of aluminum and slide onto each other to build the array the way you want.
Old 27th December 2016
  #7
Here for the gear
 

KEL:

Yes, it's a slim budget compared I understand but it parallels the places and amounts we are playing. Small bars mostly. We only play 2-4 times a month as we all have day jobs and families. This for us, is for fun and make some music together.

I'm looking at a digital mixer because I want the freedom to mix anywhere. I'm also a software developer so computers are in my wheel house. While I love a switch and a knob, I can live without it if I don't have to jump over someone on the stage to mix the sound.

I looked at the RCFs and thought about the 8s but they are going to break the budget new. I've seen them used on Reverb for $1195-1495+shipping. The Curv 500 is $2199 and I can't find any used.

The reason that I am trying to stay away from traditional 12" + large subs is 3 reasons:

1. Bulk wise, I'm trying to limit the need for a huge SUV/van to carry the gear.
2. Weight - I really don't want to haul around, lift and setup - not that I'm weak but I AM lazy
3. Dispersion - I like the way sound disperses across the field when you are left and right of center. I walked around the entire store where the dude was demoing the Curv and it was very little dropoff of sound to the side.

One question I have about the RCF stuff - is it REALLY that good and well made and can my ears discern a difference vs. the LDs mixed well? I heard the volume on a single LD Curv and it was more than sufficient.
Old 27th December 2016
  #8
Here for the gear
 

Bhandy,

Have you had any experience with LD System's equipment? Did you work with the RCF 8's or 12's?
Old 28th December 2016
  #9
Gear Maniac
 

Our MI division sells and rents them. I know the history. Some of the speakers they badge and sell are badged and sold by other well known companies. I have experience with all of the comparable RCFs. What is your location? I can have the RCF rep contact you directly with a demo.
Old 28th December 2016
  #10
Here for the gear
 

I'm in Naples, Florida.
Old 28th December 2016
  #11
Gear Nut
 

I'd go with RCF evox 8. If you think it is too expensive, try get only one first, it may be enough for a small bar thanks to the 120 degree dispersion angle.

The curve system does not look so easy to pack and transport. If you always need four satellite speakers, why make them modular? And the tops does not fit into the sub. Specs wise, the max spl is the same 128dB. But the EVOX 8 has a 12s woofer which is much needed for bass. Additionally, the quality of RCF is also better than the LD curve based on the reviews I found online.
Old 28th December 2016
  #12
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MSDTrinity View Post
I'm in Naples, Florida.
If you are serious, pm me your contact info.
Old 28th December 2016
  #13
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cxhawk View Post
I'd go with RCF evox 8. If you think it is too expensive, try get only one first, it may be enough for a small bar thanks to the 120 degree dispersion angle.

The curve system does not look so easy to pack and transport. If you always need four satellite speakers, why make them modular? And the tops does not fit into the sub. Specs wise, the max spl is the same 128dB. But the EVOX 8 has a 12s woofer which is much needed for bass. Additionally, the quality of RCF is also better than the LD curve based on the reviews I found online.
The reason for the modular satellites are because you could double this to use as a home theater setup or use less speakers than needed. They slide together so there are no wires/latches.

There are bags for all 4 satellites that make it easy to carry but it is bulkier than the RCF setup.

I wanted to go with L/R sides so I could actually do stereo (I have some effects that can take advantage plus we have some vocal effects that have L/R as well).

What about 2 RCF Evox 5s? They have the same size sub 10" as the LDs?

Where can did you find the comparison reviews because I've been searching forever looking for them?
Old 28th December 2016
  #14
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bhandy View Post
If you are serious, pm me your contact info.
Thank you, I might take you up on that but in the meantime, I'm in contact with a dealer that has both LD and RCF. I've also contacted someone who has the RCF Evox 5s and 8s and uses it as part of a larger setup within their main PA but they play larger venues.

I'm wondering if I could do 2 of the Evox 5s as they would be less expensive then the 8s. I'm scouring Reverb and eBay to see if there are any used 8s out there as well.

If I buy the RCFs, it will be a leap of faith but on 1 video I watched, they sounded 10x better than a matchup head to head with JBL PRX612m top cabs over Yamaha DXS12 subs.

If I could get away with 2 x Evox 5s I'd actually be saving money!
Old 31st December 2016
  #15
Here for the gear
 

A different approach?

I play keyboards in a five piece classic rock band, and also provide and mix the PA. I've been doing this for many years, and have tried many different approaches.

The gear you're talking about (e.g. Curv) might look cool, but I think you might want to think about things differently.

Or not. It's your money

My first suggestion: consider running VOCALS ONLY through your fronts. Your stage amps and drums are probably plenty loud enough. The mikes will pick up some of your instruments as well. Your vocals will sound a whole lot cleaner. The venue owner will appreciate the more moderate volume.

And it will also save you money in other areas. If you need something bigger once in a while, borrow or rent it.

Examples: a pair of QSCs, EVs, Yamahas or even those RCFs should be more than enough for this application. I often use a pair of QSC K8s for FOH vocals, and they're more than enough for a good-sized bar as they sound great and have wide dispersion. Keep in mind you don't need (or want) a sub for this application.

Going in this direction would leave plenty of $$$ for things like stage monitors which you didn't mention. And you'll sound better.

My second suggestion: if you go with vocals only through the FOH, you won't need a big mixer. 4-6 inputs with a single AUX mix for the monitors should be enough. More money saved, simpler setup, less that can go wrong in the middle of a gig, etc.

My third suggestion: stay clear of digital mixer controls if you expect to be performing and mixing at the same time. Unless you're superman, that is. Better to place that small analog mixer at your feet, along with your pedals.

I just sold my QSC TouchMix because it was impossible to control while I was playing. I am a computer geek -- that's not the issue -- it's just that the control surface didn't work out well in the fog of war.

I now am much happier with old-school knobs that I can locate and twist in a split-second if needed. Some lessons are learned the hard way.

My fourth suggestion: take the money you've saved, and buy at least two self-powered floor monitors so the vocalists can hear themselves sing. You'll enjoy it more, and your audience will thank you as well.

Here's a typical rig I play out with in medium-sized bars. Not fancy, but we sound great, get plenty of compliments and are invited back. P.S. I am not budget limited, these are simply good tools for the task at hand. Remember, I'm a keyboard player who also has to do sound, not a professional sound guy.

Fronts: 2 x QSC K8s (vocals only, wide dispersion). $1300 retail
Monitors: 2x QSC K10s (vocals only) $1400 retail.
Board: Yamaha MG20XU (vocals only) $299 retail. It sits on a small table next to my keyboard stack.
Optional: dbx GoRack for EQ and feedback squelch (monitors) $29.95 retail. Set and forget.

Other choices from other manufacturers are certainly possible.

But here's my point: even if you pay list prices, you're at ~$3000. The whole setup could easily fit in a small car, along with your instruments. I can set up the PA in under 15 minutes if I have to. Better yet, you have building blocks that you can reuse in other systems as you grow. And all these items have proven resale value.

Pro tip: call various online retailers and ask for used or "B" stock. That will save you several hundred dollars. I wouldn't see a problem getting to your $2500 price point, which leaves money for poles, cables, microphones, etc.

That being said, I also have a bigger rig for bigger venues. Tops and bottoms, 16-channel board, 6 monitors, outboard sound rack, stage snake, light show, etc. Plus a pickup truck to haul it around. But now we're talking $15,000 or more.

9 out of 10 times, it's the smaller rig.

Best of luck
Old 1st January 2017
  #16
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cphollis View Post
I play keyboards in a five piece classic rock band, and also provide and mix the PA. I've been doing this for many years, and have tried many different approaches.

The gear you're talking about (e.g. Curv) might look cool, but I think you might want to think about things differently.

Or not. It's your money

My first suggestion: consider running VOCALS ONLY through your fronts. Your stage amps and drums are probably plenty loud enough. The mikes will pick up some of your instruments as well. Your vocals will sound a whole lot cleaner. The venue owner will appreciate the more moderate volume.

And it will also save you money in other areas. If you need something bigger once in a while, borrow or rent it.

Examples: a pair of QSCs, EVs, Yamahas or even those RCFs should be more than enough for this application. I often use a pair of QSC K8s for FOH vocals, and they're more than enough for a good-sized bar as they sound great and have wide dispersion. Keep in mind you don't need (or want) a sub for this application.

Going in this direction would leave plenty of $$$ for things like stage monitors which you didn't mention. And you'll sound better.

My second suggestion: if you go with vocals only through the FOH, you won't need a big mixer. 4-6 inputs with a single AUX mix for the monitors should be enough. More money saved, simpler setup, less that can go wrong in the middle of a gig, etc.

My third suggestion: stay clear of digital mixer controls if you expect to be performing and mixing at the same time. Unless you're superman, that is. Better to place that small analog mixer at your feet, along with your pedals.

I just sold my QSC TouchMix because it was impossible to control while I was playing. I am a computer geek -- that's not the issue -- it's just that the control surface didn't work out well in the fog of war.

I now am much happier with old-school knobs that I can locate and twist in a split-second if needed. Some lessons are learned the hard way.

My fourth suggestion: take the money you've saved, and buy at least two self-powered floor monitors so the vocalists can hear themselves sing. You'll enjoy it more, and your audience will thank you as well.

Here's a typical rig I play out with in medium-sized bars. Not fancy, but we sound great, get plenty of compliments and are invited back. P.S. I am not budget limited, these are simply good tools for the task at hand. Remember, I'm a keyboard player who also has to do sound, not a professional sound guy.

Fronts: 2 x QSC K8s (vocals only, wide dispersion). $1300 retail
Monitors: 2x QSC K10s (vocals only) $1400 retail.
Board: Yamaha MG10XU (vocals only) $299 retail. It sits on a small table next to my keyboard stack.
Optional: dbx GoRack for EQ and feedback squelch (monitors) $29.95 retail. Set and forget.

Other choices from other manufacturers are certainly possible.

But here's my point: even if you pay list prices, you're at ~$3000. The whole setup could easily fit in a small car, along with your instruments. I can set up the PA in under 15 minutes if I have to. Better yet, you have building blocks that you can reuse in other systems as you grow. And all these items have proven resale value.

Pro tip: call various online retailers and ask for used or "B" stock. That will save you several hundred dollars. I wouldn't see a problem getting to your $2500 price point, which leaves money for poles, cables, microphones, etc.

That being said, I also have a bigger rig for bigger venues. Tops and bottoms, 16-channel board, 6 monitors, outboard sound rack, stage snake, light show, etc. Plus a pickup truck to haul it around. But now we're talking $15,000 or more.

9 out of 10 times, it's the smaller rig.

Best of luck
I disagree with about everything in this post. Vocal only PA systems are for bands that never want to get paid decent and be stuck in low paying bar jobs forever. My band also uses a touchmix 16 with all 16 channels being used. I mix it while playing bass.
Old 1st January 2017
  #17
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Wyllys's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by modulusman View Post
I disagree with about everything in this post. Vocal only PA systems are for bands that never want to get paid decent and be stuck in low paying bar jobs forever. My band also uses a touchmix 16 with all 16 channels being used. I mix it while playing bass.
Low paying bar jobs is the epitome of redundant expression. I started playing bars/clubs nearly 50 years ago. While the cost of living has gone up...and UP...the wages for these gigs has not. Given the OPs particular situation and aspirations, I'd say that the vocal only PA is quite apt.

The bottom line on getting hired back/hired regularly depends more on talent and affability rather than gear and SPL.
Old 1st January 2017
  #18
Gear Nut
 

[QUOTE=Wyllys;12346162]Low paying bar jobs is the epitome of redundant expression. I started playing bars/clubs nearly 50 years ago. While the cost of living has gone up...and UP...the wages for these gigs has not. Given the OPs particular situation and aspirations, I'd say that the vocal only PA is quite apt.

The bottom line on getting hired back/hired regularly depends more on talent and affability rather than gear and SPL.[/QUOTE]

And to get better gigs and more money depends on sounding better than your competition. Any gig that I play where I have a say in the PA a subwoofer is involved, even if it is a small room with 50 people.
Old 1st January 2017
  #19
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by modulusman View Post
I disagree with about everything in this post. Vocal only PA systems are for bands that never want to get paid decent and be stuck in low paying bar jobs forever. My band also uses a touchmix 16 with all 16 channels being used. I mix it while playing bass.
Modulsman, I think you might be missing a few key factors here from the OP. First, they're doing it for fun. Second, simplicity seems to be a priority.

Your goals might be different. But don't impose your personal goals on someone else
Old 1st January 2017
  #20
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cphollis View Post
Modulsman, I think you might be missing a few key factors here from the OP. First, they're doing it for fun. Second, simplicity seems to be a priority.

Your goals might be different. But don't impose your personal goals on someone else
How do you know for sure that the OP wants to just play lame bar gigs forever. He originally stated he wanted to buy an x air mixer but you steer him to a Mixer that doesn't even have an aux send for a monitor. totally useless for a live band and yes I use to own one.
Old 1st January 2017
  #21
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by modulusman View Post
How do you know for sure that the OP wants to just play lame bar gigs forever. He originally stated he wanted to buy an x air mixer but you steer him to a Mixer that doesn't even have an aux send for a monitor. totally useless for a live band and yes I use to own one.
Here's what the OP said:

"Yes, it's a slim budget compared I understand but it parallels the places and amounts we are playing. Small bars mostly. We only play 2-4 times a month as we all have day jobs and families. This for us, is for fun and make some music together."

Draw your own conclusions?

I usually recommend mixers with one or two aux sends for the monitors. The one I mentioned has FOUR aux sends.

Read the posts please. Your responses will be more helpful that way.
Old 1st January 2017
  #22
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cphollis View Post
Here's what the OP said:

"Yes, it's a slim budget compared I understand but it parallels the places and amounts we are playing. Small bars mostly. We only play 2-4 times a month as we all have day jobs and families. This for us, is for fun and make some music together."

Draw your own conclusions?

I usually recommend mixers with one or two aux sends for the monitors. The one I mentioned has FOUR aux sends.

Read the posts please. Your responses will be more helpful that way.
The only one I see you mentioning is this Yamaha MG10XU 10-Channel Mixer with Effects | Musician's Friend
Old 1st January 2017
  #23
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by modulusman View Post
The only one I see you mentioning is this Yamaha MG10XU 10-Channel Mixer with Effects | Musician's Friend
Typo. Meant to recommend the Yamaha MG 20MXU. My bad.
Old 1st January 2017
  #24
Here for the gear
 

A more fully featured discussion ..

Quote:
Originally Posted by cphollis View Post
Typo. Meant to recommend the Yamaha MG 20MXU. My bad.
Hey, thought this was worthy of an extended blog post.

Here:
Getting The Sound Right For Your Band - Late Bloomer
Old 1st January 2017
  #25
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cphollis View Post
Hey, thought this was worthy of an extended blog post.

Here:
Getting The Sound Right For Your Band - Late Bloomer
Well if it is any consolation I disagree with everything in your blog also. BTW no one makes a real line array that costs $20,000.00. I don't think Presonus makes a 20 channel mixer either.
Old 1st January 2017
  #26
Gear Nut
 

I would look at the Yamaha DXR series speakers. They are cheaper than QSC k series and sound as good or better. They also don't start to sound harsh when pushed which many users of the K series report happens. You could get 4 of them and a Behringer x18 for about 3k. If you would have bought them before new years you could have gotten a $50.00 mail in rebate from Yamaha on each speaker.
With the x18 you would probably never outgrow your mixer and if you decided to expand your speaker system you could buy a Yamaha dxs sub or two. I played a gig this weekend where I used 2 Yamaha dxr12s for mains a pair of dxr10s for monitors and one dxs12 sub. While the sub weighs 70 pounds it doesn't feel that heavy. My 56 year old ass loaded it and unloaded it by myself. I actually had to carry it about 50 yards when I loaded in.
Old 1st January 2017
  #27
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MSDTrinity View Post
Hi All,

I'm a guitarist playing in a 4 piece classic rock band and I'm about to plunk down for my own PA system. I've done a lot of reading and studying with various products but I would really appreciate some opinions on what I've come up with.

Firstly my requirements:

1. $2500 - $3000 budget
2. System needs to be as small and compact (and light!) as possible so I can transport easily.
3. Must sound clear and be able to get relatively loud (we are playing small 100-150 ppl bars/pubs).
4. Need to be able to mix from anywhere.
5. Easy/quick to setup and tear down.

In my research I've boiled it down to 2 speaker systems and 2 mixers:

For the speakers:

LD Systems Curv 500 PS

Turbosound Inspire IP2000

I've heard a SINGLE Curv 500 setup and I was blown away by how loud and clear it was. I wasn't thrilled with the onboard mixer but I'm not really looking to use it much. It was extremely lightweight. Really, it's only down side was that it was $300 more for the unit and an additional $200 for the bags to carry it.

I have NOT heard the Turbosound but have read in numerous places that it's sound is great and loud as well. From the specs, it appears the SPL is higher on the Curv but I'm not sure how that would sound in real life vs each other.

The one big negative on the Turbosound is the weight of the sub unit, it's in the neighborhood of 50lbs. I believe the Curb sub is around 30lbs.

The big positive for the Turbosound is the price.


For the mixer:

I'm torn between the Behringer X AIR16 and the X18 (desktop version). I can't blow the budget on the X AIR18 (Air 16 = 399 X18 = 499 X AIR18 = 699).

Other than the shape of the unit of the X18 vs. the X AIR16, what am I missing between the 2 units?

My pros for the X18 are 18-xlr inputs and 18 channel recording. While I doubt I would need more the 16 inputs provided by the X AIR16, I like the not having to worry about not having enough. The 18 channel recording is the seller for the X18 but the size and ability to place it on the stage without getting stepped on make the X AIR 16 seem to me more durable.

My drummer has a good mic set and I have direct out on head or can mic my cab. The bass can go direct out from his amp or mic as well as the other guitarist. I was planning on running everything through the mixer and trying to get a truly balanced sound.

We're not playing large venues and if we did and needed something bigger, I would look to rent a professional sound company to do it for us for those cases.

Any help/suggestions is MUCH appreciated! Thanks in advance.
If you ask around, you can get an X18 for $400-500. There is nothing out there today that can beat this for value, and that little mixer will grow with the band.

3K is tough, but possible for a starter rig IMO.

1) X18 $500
2a) DXR15 (x2) = $1300 (make sure to ask around for a pair at best price)
2b) Alto TS215 (x2) $600 (lower cost than the DXR's, lighter, but not as loud, and not nearly as robust)
3) EV ND767 microphones (x3) $150.00 (if you can still find them they are a steal)
4) Kick mic Audix D6 $200
5) Tom Mic's Sennheiser e604 3 pack ($300)
6) Guitar mic Sennheiser e609 ($100)
7) Speaker Stands (x2) $200
8) Cords and mic stands ($300)

So lets take a quick stock of where we are here.

With DXR15's $3050
With Alto TS215's $2350

I would personally recommend going with the DXR's. They are absolutely bullet proof, and sound fantastic. ZZSounds is selling them new (blemished) for $650.

The DXR's will allow you to put bass and a little kick into the mix, but you are going to want a sub at some point IMO.

Good luck!
Old 1st January 2017
  #28
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by OneEng View Post
If you ask around, you can get an X18 for $400-500. There is nothing out there today that can beat this for value, and that little mixer will grow with the band.

3K is tough, but possible for a starter rig IMO.

1) X18 $500
2a) DXR15 (x2) = $1300 (make sure to ask around for a pair at best price)
2b) Alto TS215 (x2) $600 (lower cost than the DXR's, lighter, but not as loud, and not nearly as robust)
3) EV ND767 microphones (x3) $150.00 (if you can still find them they are a steal)
4) Kick mic Audix D6 $200
5) Tom Mic's Sennheiser e604 3 pack
($300)
6) Guitar mic Sennheiser e609 ($100)
7) Speaker Stands (x2) $200
8) Cords and mic stands ($300)

So lets take a quick stock of where we are here.

With DXR15's $3050
With Alto TS215's $2350

I would personally recommend going with the DXR's. They are absolutely bullet proof, and sound fantastic. ZZSounds is selling them new (blemished) for $650.

The DXR's will allow you to put bass and a little kick into the mix, but you are going to want a sub at some point IMO.

Good luck!
The OP said his drummer already has good mics.
Old 1st January 2017
  #29
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by modulusman View Post
The OP said his drummer already has good mics.
Good catch.

Still, my point was that you can get a decent PA for 3K (without subs). I have heard lots of bands play with significantly less capable PA gear. Not sayin that it always sounded good though
Old 4th January 2017
  #30
Here for the gear
 

Everyone that responded....thank you very much for your opinions and insights. I was following along and have been through everyone's advice a couple of times weighing the pros/cons of everything. This is what I came up with:

In all of the posts that I read, no one has actually said they heard the Curv 500 against other speakers. I actually went to a local music store that sold QSC, Yamaha, Peavey and the LDs. I listened to the Curv 500 against 12" and 15" sub combos as well as stand alone 12" powered speakers. I listened at low volumes and high volumes. Each combination had it's + and -s but when I weighed all the factors involved, the Curvs won out because:

1. They were LOUD when pushed and did NOT sound tinny. The sub is small but the cross over frequencies seem to work.
2. For where we are playing, this will be MORE than enough whether we want to run vocals only or the entire mix.
3. Price wise, the Curv 500 PS (which 2 sides) lists for $2200 (but I'll come back to price in a second).
4. For monitors, the dispersion pattern of the Curv allows you to hear pretty clear from the side and based upon where we've played, this should work. We have some other monitors we can hook up if need be or I'll buy a used 10" QSC or Yamaha for that. I can even run a direct IEM through one of the aux's on the X18.
5. If money were no object, I would have bought the RCF EVOX 8 but 2 of those units run $1800 a piece. The guy I was dealing with told me that they would sound better and be a little bit louder but based on what I was telling him, the Curv would work great for my application. I thought about a pair of used EVOX 8s but the shipping was ridiculous making it not much of a better buy then new.


I found a place in NJ called KPODJ.COM that was great and had ridiculous prices:

The Curv 500 PS 2199 my price 1940.
Behringer X AIR XR18 $699 my price $495 (yes, its brand new I kept asking - are you sure?)

I wanted the AIR XR18 not just because of the # channels (and flexible connection options) but the added ability to record each channel individually.

I know this will handle the places we are playing and the places we would like to play. If by some stroke of magic genius, we're asked to play an outdoor festival or some really large venue that this won't handle, we'll rent a sound company to professionally work our sound.

Regarding vocals only vs. full mics - my thoughts are to experiment with what sounds the best. So far, we've only been running vocals that way and an occasional kick/snare to give it some bottom. The problems have been unbalanced guitars on either side depending on where you stand.

I'm a network and software engineer so digital is the only way I wanted to go. I already own a 12-channel Xenyx mixer with faders and knobs and it does nothing special. I want the flexibility to mix the sound anywhere or hand it over to someone who can hear us and mix while we play. I'm breaking down for one of those iPad clips for the mic stand so I can do it as needed. The best part about the digital mixer is that I can save my profiles and inputs so that I don't need to remember any settings or have marks on the mixer to manually adjust everything right away.

The gear should be arriving at the end of the week or early next week. I'll have plenty of time to test it out and see what it can and can't do. What I do know is that based on what I've been currently using, this will be much better.

Thanks again for all of the feedback it was extremely helpful. I can post a follow up if anyone is interested.
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