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Improving Your Musical Self Esteem
Old 14th September 2019
  #1
Gear Head
 

Improving Your Musical Self Esteem

I thought some of you might be interested in this video: a semi-rambling and discursive video I shot about practical ways to improve your self-esteem and stay focused on your long-term creative goals.

Old 14th September 2019
  #2
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Youget down to the meat of it at around 12:30. I don't entirely agree with you. Sure, quantifying the work is fine if that elevates your musical self-esteem. But that would only work for me if more work meant better work; for me it never does.

On the other hand, There's a guy here in LA who hosts open mics and songwriters' workshops. He claims to have written over a thousand songs, and to work at songwriting at least a couple hours every day. I believe him on both counts.

But based on the examples I've heard, he's written the same basic song about 997 times, and I couldn't hum you any of them. He seems to feel good about it, though.

Last edited by Brent Hahn; 15th September 2019 at 07:55 AM..
Old 14th September 2019
  #3
I don't want to come across as rude... but lotta spurious Mr.

You go out and play, you talk to other performers, that's how you get feedback that's how you collaborate quickly and effectively.
The youtube route will get you so far then you progress to playing live or going to the venues and talking to musicians. Whether that means producing/recording or playing.

All the while being a naturally creative type you'll be writing/experimenting/recording and as you mentioned improving.

You may ask what credentials I have...how successful?
I have none, I'm a happy amateur. Success is not my driving force, but when I did play gigs, when I did make the effort (and it can be an effort to travel) I got opportunities. I played with working musicians who went from town to town and they and the audience were the ones who gave feedback.

Best of luck to all that want to make a living from music especially if you're a no compromise artist like Nick Cave et al.
Old 14th September 2019
  #4
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
Youget down to the meat of it at around 12:30. I don't entirely agree with you. Sure, quantifying the work is fine if that elevates your musical self-esteem. But that would only work for me if more work meant better work; for me it never does.

On the other hand, There's a guy here in LA who hosts open mics and songwriters' workshops. He claims to have written over a thousand songs, and to work at songwriting at least a couple hours every day. I believe him on both counts.

But based on the examples I've heard, he's written the same basic song about 997 times, and I couldn't hum you any of them. He seems to feel good about it, though.

For what it's worth, there's been a lot of research into the psychology of performance, admittedly mostly focusing on classical music, and there's a pretty clear link between practice time and skill.

Of course, it's more complicated than that: blind repetition isn't particularly useful. It's important to practice with intention, and to practice correctly, which is nice in theory but difficult in practice.

I think it's key to be really critical about what genuinely does help you improve, so you can have some faith in that when your feelings aren't cooperating.
Old 14th September 2019
  #5
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Howling Terror View Post
You go out and play, you talk to other performers, that's how you get feedback that's how you collaborate quickly and effectively.
The youtube route will get you so far then you progress to playing live or going to the venues and talking to musicians. Whether that means producing/recording or playing.
I suspect that depends a lot on your relationship with music.

A lot of artists take this path, but there are plenty of artists whose approach is more like that of an author - mostly working solo, and collaborating only as necessary and once the writing is done.

Soliciting opinions from other people is a mixed blessing. Sometimes it's useful, but over the years I've found it's better to cultivate my own, and have a few select folks whose opinions I value.
Old 15th September 2019
  #6
No original artist solicits opinions but surely all artists keep their ears and mind open to suggestions.

David Bowie wouldn't of been the icon he became if he'd not had great people to collaborate with, he was a sponge in the nicest sense.

I guess if you're a composer for film or tv then collaboration doesn't feature much with sample libraries n such, or indeed if it's just you and your instrument playing in bars. Even then you'd gain valuable insight in working a crowd or Mic technique from other musicians that a book or video can't fully convey.
To expand horizons, to learn that bit faster and from others experiences/mistakes then face to face is the way to go in my opinion.

Relationship with music? That's a topic too deep for me to expand upon. Leave that to others who have the time to type it out.

Hey, more power to you and your elbow. I know you're trying to help.
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