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Indie Pop/Rock Drums in a House - Tracking
Old 3rd December 2013
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Indie Pop/Rock Drums in a House - Tracking

I'm tracking drums for an indie rock/pop band in a house. I would appreciate some advice if anyone is willing.

The Room: 13'4" wide, 45' long, with 8' ceilings - basically a long, wide hallway. The drum kit will be sitting at one end (the "dead end") of the room, replete with mattresses on walls, a couch, a large rug, and and a bunch of blankets and pillows filling in the gaps. The room then goes into what is the dining room (wood floors and a bit more liveliness/brightness due to less furniture/mattresses) and then into the kitchen (very bright, tile floors). The "pinging" between walls has been effectively treated with diffusers.

Pre/EQ: (2) 1073 vintage, (2) 1073 AMS, (2) 1084 BAE, (2) 1064 vintage, (2) API 212, (2) Calrec 1161-02, (6) Amek 9098, and (1) DW Fearn VT-1.

Microphones: (1) U67, (1) UM57, (2) 47 Fet, (1) D12E, (1) M88, (2) M500, (4) 57, (2) Coles 4038, (2) Rode NT5, (3) C 480 B - each with different caps: CK62 ULS, CK 62-DF, CK 61-ULS; (1) C451E, (1) ADK A-51TC.

The Stipulations: I can only cut EIGHT (8) tracks at a time! I won't have the best listening environment, so picking and choosing by ear isn't really an option.

My Thoughts:

Kick Out: 47 fet ---> 1073 vintage
Kick In: D12E ---> 1073 AMS
Snare Top: 57 ---> 1073 vintage
Snare Bottom: C 480 B Cardioid (with 10 db pad) ---> API 212 with 20 db pad
Rooms: Coles as a spaced pair in front of the kit (maybe 8 feet) to eliminate early reflections from the ceiling ---> 1064/1064.
Room: U67 ---> 1073 AMS. Splitting the Coles. Maybe at a different height.
Reverb Microphone: C 480 B omni (not sure which capsule out of the ULS or DF) ---> API 212. This mic will be in the kitchen somewhere…. or maybe a bedroom with a door open.

Please let me know what you guys would choose to do in this space and situation. Thanks so much.
Old 3rd December 2013
  #2
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I find it curious that your plan is to use the "dead" end of the room but, use 4 of your 8 inputs on room/reverb mic... Whats your thought process there? (just curious) If it was me (and without hearing the kit or the kit in the room I would start off with something like this:

mono overhead: U67 - 1073
Kick Out: D12- 1073
Snare: 57 - 1073
FOK: Coles - 1073

From there depending on whats lacking

Floor tom: m88 - 1084
Rack tom: 57 - 1084
Mono Room: UM57 in Omni - 1064
Hat: C451E - 1064

or something like that. You have lots of great stuff to work with have fun with it
Old 3rd December 2013
  #3
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syra's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenclaw View Post
Pre/EQ: (2) 1073 vintage, (2) 1073 AMS, (2) 1084 BAE, (2) 1064 vintage, (2) API 212, (2) Calrec 1161-02, (6) Amek 9098, and (1) DW Fearn VT-1.
I find it very interesting that you listed each Neve model instead of saying 8 channels of Neve.
Old 3rd December 2013
  #4
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Blaine Misner's Avatar
 

i've done this many times. here is my favourite record cut in this fashion
Pet Parade
band tracked live in the same room... which was a 19th century farm house. real cool vibe.

one thing i can say from my experiences is that a lot of the tracks i do in house environments end up with a fairly strident top end. i end up relying much more heavily on ribbons/dynamics/and DARK condensers to mitigate the brightness of the room.
if memory serves me correctly. overs where coles and we had a wunder 67 copy on FOK. everything else was dynamic. 441,d12,201,etc.
hope this helped, somewhat.
Old 3rd December 2013
  #5
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That's actually a really good room setup for drums, except for the ceilings. You can get many different reverb predelay times depending on mic placement because of the hallway effect. Try a ribbon for the room start at 2/3 the way down from the drum side... and just use the 47's for main stereo pair about 5 feet in front of the kit (closer and lower if you want it wider and denser sounding. You don't need much more than that for a basic drum kit and a standard player. Close miking really only helps when you've got a lot of stuff going on... it's easier just to get a good stereo sound. Maybe use a kick mic at most for close miking. Don't hit the cymbals hard. You're good to go. Start simple and add more mics if needed. So, stereo pair for main mics, stereo ribbon for room, and maybe kick mic.
Old 4th December 2013
  #6
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timtoonz's Avatar
Seems like a pretty good setup, though I'm a little curious why you can only record 8 tracks at once when the rest of the gear seems so top notch.

My only other thought was to use a vintage 1073 on the U67 over the kit (instead of a room). Seems the room/OH mic would benefit from the 1073 'bump' more than a snare mic, especially a 57. I'd think an AMEK could do the snare job fine, but a U67/1073 combo can be pretty magical.

I'd also suggest using the Coles as a stereo O/H pair, but low, like shoulder height, over the kit. No need for tom-mics if you do this, and it might be all you need with a bit of kick and snare blended in.

That's just my 2 cents…
Old 4th December 2013
  #7
Gear Nut
 

Thanks so much guys. I am considering everything.

And it is a 19th century farm house; good call!

And, um, I listed the different Neve pre/eq because I'm a gear slut. And they have different... Never mind.

8 tracks at a time is the plain sad fact of the matter. You're right, it doesn't match up with the gear; I don't have the cash to upgrade to an hd rig. If anyone wants to buy the DW Fearn, racked Calrecs, and Amek stuff... I could put a dent in it.

Thanks again for the responses, fellas.
Old 4th December 2013
  #8
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herecomesyourman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenclaw View Post
Thanks so much guys. I am considering everything.

And it is a 19th century farm house; good call!

And, um, I listed the different Neve pre/eq because I'm a gear slut. And they have different... Never mind.

8 tracks at a time is the plain sad fact of the matter. You're right, it doesn't match up with the gear; I don't have the cash to upgrade to an hd rig. If anyone wants to buy the DW Fearn, racked Calrecs, and Amek stuff... I could put a dent in it.

Thanks again for the responses, fellas.

I don't think you need an HD rig to make this work for you if you've got all these different NEVE style channels around. I really want to ask for a list of other outboard in this studio before you get started but I made a few notes:
  • Kick Out: 47 fet ---> 1073 vintage
  • Kick In: D12E ---> 1073 AMS
  • Snare Top: 57 ---> 1073 vintage (Maybe try a variety of dynamics...see what sounds best here, 57's are abused to a point where people don't think enough about the tone of the snare drum first sometimes.)
  • Snare Bottom: C 480 B Cardioid (with 10 db pad) ---> API 212 with 20 db pad (Spend $40 on a Shure Attenuation pad, set it on -15dB, you'll prefer how it sounds to the stock pad.)
  • Rooms: Coles as a spaced pair in front of the kit (maybe 8 feet) to eliminate early reflections from the ceiling ---> 1064/1064.
  • Room: U67 ---> 1073 AMS. Splitting the Coles. Maybe at a different height.
  • Reverb Microphone: C 480 B omni (not sure which capsule out of the ULS orDF) ---> API 212. This mic will be in the kitchen somewhere…. or maybe a bedroom with a door open. (Spend $40 on another Shure pad. Also set at -15dB, ALSO you could use this mic as a THIRD overhead in the middle to really give you MORE snare.)
Old 4th December 2013
  #9
Gear Nut
 

Thanks for your input. I'll give those pads a shot. The rest of the gear consists primarily of dynamics: (2) dbx 160 VU, (1) EL8 distressor, (2) tube-tech cl1b, and a focusrite red 3 stereo comp. I was thinking of saying no to dynamics when tracking... Saving it for mix. Kinda thinking the same thing with EQ, thiugh I'll prob get the snare sounding how I like it and maybe dip some 300 from a a mic or two. Thoughts?
Old 4th December 2013
  #10
Gear Nut
 

Digging the vibe of that tune on the Pet Parade link. Well done!
Old 5th December 2013
  #11
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herecomesyourman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenclaw View Post
Thanks for your input. I'll give those pads a shot. The rest of the gear consists primarily of dynamics: (2) dbx 160 VU, (1) EL8 distressor, (2) tube-tech cl1b, and a focusrite red 3 stereo comp. I was thinking of saying no to dynamics when tracking... Saving it for mix. Kinda thinking the same thing with EQ, thiugh I'll prob get the snare sounding how I like it and maybe dip some 300 from a a mic or two. Thoughts?

You're totally welcome!

I would not be afraid to EQ and compress going in with that great of a setup, I would however want to listen to the drummer during a warmup, very carefully in order to get settings you wouldn't touch until things were done.

For Compression:

I would think about using the EL8 on the Front of Kick Mic (maybe even in NUKE mode.) That mic will be able to take it, and blend a very compressed but usable sound back into the whole of things.

I would maybe think about using the Focusrite on the room mics as well, and use light to even medium compression settings, depending on what sounds best.

I would think about trying the DBX 160's on the kick in and snare bottom (but you don't have to match settings, just go with what sounds good on each.)

I'm not one to compress overheads much, but both CL1b's would probably sound great in line, ever so lightly compressing to just make things a little prettier.

I would think about getting a hold of some sort of 1176 style compressor for snare top if you can budget it. A Lindell Audio 7X500 can be had for $299...with a small six slot 500 series lunchbox of some kind that could be done on the dirt cheap.

If not you can always use an 1176 style plugin on that track when mixing.


For EQ:

LOW AND MID BAND:

I would start by lightly boost 4K8, as well as 60Hz on the kick drum, front of kick, overheads, and room mics. All to taste before setting compressors. (This should all reinforce the Kick Drum the Most.) If you find you want more snare out of the overheads and room mics I would boost 1K6 instead of 4K8 on those sources, but you'll want the 4K8 on the Kick and Front of Kick either way, it'll help make the beater sound work for you. If you need more toms on the overheads and room mics, swap 60Hz up for boosting at 110Hz...but again, 60Hz is the best best on anything directly kick related.

HIGH BAND AND HIGH PASS FILTER:

I would think about using a little of the 12KHz boost shelf on most sources (Try it to see if it "blooms", I know the 1066 is different so maybe 10Khz or evne 16Khz to add some dimension?)

I would always try to EQ BEFORE COMPRESSING, and I wouldn't bother with the High Pass Filters unless something is sounding boomy with compression in a bad way...that' when I'd cut at 50Hz only, don't get more aggressive than that..


We're only talking light doses of EQ and Compression (except with the Distressor on the FOK mic), so remember not to get too aggressive with anything, just listen to the drummer play and during a warmup and dial to taste using your ear. Think about how things bloom and come alive when you're get just enough of something incorporated...then make sure not to overdo anything when you've dialed it all in.

But I wouldn't be scared about using the tools you have to get the best sound.

Last edited by herecomesyourman; 5th December 2013 at 03:02 AM.. Reason: EDIT: Just refining my thought process a bit.
Old 5th December 2013
  #12
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jmikeperkins's Avatar
First of all, use the U67 as an overhead and maybe the 47fet as a 2nd overhead. These are your best mics and they should be the stars and the primary mics for your whole kit. Listen to the remixed Beatles Let It Be Naked CD if you want to hear how great a U67 sounds as a drum overhead. I have recorded a lot of drums in houses with 8' foot ceilings and room widths about 12-13 feet and you have to be very careful not to use too many mics. The reason is in such a small place the mic patterns are going to overlap and the quick reflections off the walls will result in some amount phase cancellation no matter how carefully you position your mics. The result could be that every mic you add after about 4-5 might make your kit sound smaller and not bigger. In a large room with high ceilings this is not as much of an issue. Just as an experiment, I would try fewer mics, perhaps lose the bottom snare mic, the outside kick, the "reverb" mic (you can add that later if you want) and MAYBE even the Coles as room mics (or put them on their own channels and decide later if you need them). Record that set up. Then you can add the outside kick, the bottom snare, the room mics and maybe the reverb mic and record that. See which is better. Remember the classic Led Zeppelin When the Levy Breaks was recorded in a house with TWO mics and it is stands as one the best recorded drum tracks ever.
Old 5th December 2013
  #13
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Ntk drummer's Avatar
 

Well, I don't think he's recording john bonham. But I do agree with the minimal mic set up. As a drummer that's how I prefer to hear the kit as it seems most natural.

I be very keen to hear the results of this. Sounds like a very fun project.
Old 5th December 2013
  #14
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herecomesyourman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmikeperkins View Post
First of all, use the U67 as an overhead and maybe the 47fet as a 2nd overhead. These are your best mics and they should be the stars and the primary mics for your whole kit. Listen to the remixed Beatles Let It Be Naked CD if you want to hear how great a U67 sounds as a drum overhead. I have recorded a lot of drums in houses with 8' foot ceilings and room widths about 12-13 feet and you have to be very careful not to use too many mics. The reason is in such a small place the mic patterns are going to overlap and the quick reflections off the walls will result in some amount phase cancellation no matter how carefully you position your mics. The result could be that every mic you add after about 4-5 might make your kit sound smaller and not bigger. In a large room with high ceilings this is not as much of an issue. Just as an experiment, I would try fewer mics, perhaps lose the bottom snare mic, the outside kick, the "reverb" mic (you can add that later if you want) and MAYBE even the Coles as room mics (or put them on their own channels and decide later if you need them). Record that set up. Then you can add the outside kick, the bottom snare, the room mics and maybe the reverb mic and record that. See which is better. Remember the classic Led Zeppelin When the Levy Breaks was recorded in a house with TWO mics and it is stands as one the best recorded drum tracks ever.
Those two mics would be fine as overheads too...overheads don't have to be matching...but there's no harm in throwing up all those mics and keeping the ones that work best in each mix either. I agree that sometimes songs feel better with less going on, but I'd rather have more tracks and the options to pick which ones I want to keep, based on each song as the mix evolves.
Old 5th December 2013
  #15
Gear Nut
 

Ok, here are some samples (MP3) cut in the room today as a TEST.
No EQ. No Compression. Old drum heads.
I won't be recording the band's drums for two more weeks.

The set up:

Kick Out: 47 fet ---> 1073 vintage
Kick In: D12E ---> 1073 AMS
Snare Top: 57 ---> 1073 vintage
Snare Bottom: 57 ---> 212
Rooms: Coles (spaced pair 6 feet in front of kit) ---> 1064/1064.
Room: NT5 splitting the Coles.
Reverb Microphone: C 480 B omni (in a hallway off the main room).

Let me know what you think - what you hear. Many thanks!

I can't wait to try the U67 as an OH. Ran out of steam today... too much to do... setting up gear, etc.
Attached Files

surfing drum sample.mp3 (266.0 KB, 447 views)

zygote drum sample.mp3 (260.7 KB, 425 views)

Old 5th December 2013
  #16
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Ntk drummer's Avatar
 

I think the kick sounds great!

My first thought was that the snare has a bit too much crack and not quite enough thump. I also thought that the early reflections on the cymbals and snare were too prominent for my taste. But I suppose a lot of it has to do with context.

I don't suppose that any of the overheads are above the snare area?


Edit. I just re-read your post. It would be good to hear it with the u67 as the overhead.
Old 5th December 2013
  #17
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herecomesyourman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenclaw View Post
Ok, here are some samples (MP3) cut in the room today as a TEST.
No EQ. No Compression. Old drum heads.
I won't be recording the band's drums for two more weeks.

The set up:

Kick Out: 47 fet ---> 1073 vintage
Kick In: D12E ---> 1073 AMS
Snare Top: 57 ---> 1073 vintage
Snare Bottom: 57 ---> 212
Rooms: Coles (spaced pair 6 feet in front of kit) ---> 1064/1064.
Room: NT5 splitting the Coles.
Reverb Microphone: C 480 B omni (in a hallway off the main room).

Let me know what you think - what you hear. Many thanks!

I can't wait to try the U67 as an OH. Ran out of steam today... too much to do... setting up gear, etc.
Sounds great so far....I still wouldn't be scared to use light doses of compression and EQ as outlined. Just remember a little goes a long way. I think a lot of people these days feel scared to track with processing because they think they should just do it later, but if you stick with dominant frequencies you'll be able to EQ in layers during tracking AND mixing without pushing any single EQ too hard.

Remember that EQ's push gain on bandwidths, so musically boosting and cutting in light doses on the same or similar ranges won't cause too much by way of distortions or phase shift as your recording and mix progress.

If you EQ at a single point all at once, sometimes the temptation is there to overdo it. Don't be afraid to try a few things out.

Also room mics and front of kick are the kind of deals that were made for heavier compression settings...I think if you'll get a bit more of everything if you spend an hour dialing things in while listening to the drummer warm up.

Good luck! It's starting to take a great shape.
Old 5th December 2013
  #18
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by herecomesyourman View Post
Sounds great so far....I still wouldn't be scared to use light doses of compression and EQ as outlined. Just remember a little goes a long way. I think a lot of people these days feel scared to track with processing because they think they should just do it later, but if you stick with dominant frequencies you'll be able to EQ in layers during tracking AND mixing without pushing any single EQ too hard.

Remember that EQ's push gain on bandwidths, so musically boosting and cutting in light doses on the same or similar ranges won't cause too much by way of distortions or phase shift as your recording and mix progress.

If you EQ at a single point all at once, sometimes the temptation is there to overdo it. Don't be afraid to try a few things out.

Also room mics and front of kick are the kind of deals that were made for heavier compression settings...I think if you'll get a bit more of everything if you spend an hour dialing things in while listening to the drummer warm up.

Good luck! It's starting to take a great shape.
All very useful information. Thanks for the feedback. I will try to use some subtle EQ on the dominate frequencies. Good point with layering EQ. Good to know about kick and room compression, too. Thank you.

It's a room sound right now, for sure. I will keep playing with it over the next couple weeks and see what I can do. This band deserves a good sound. Thanks guys.
Old 5th December 2013
  #19
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herecomesyourman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenclaw View Post
All very useful information. Thanks for the feedback. I will try to use some subtle EQ on the dominate frequencies. Good point with layering EQ. Good to know about kick and room compression, too. Thank you.

It's a room sound right now, for sure. I will keep playing with it over the next couple weeks and see what I can do. This band deserves a good sound. Thanks guys.
You're totally welcome man. Maybe print out the best bits on this thread after cutting and pasting everything into a word file?

That way you can have the notes on hand while you're tweaking and you can take a pen to it and make your own notes on what's working best in that room.

Feel free to PM me any time if you ever need to talk shop more too. Have fun!
Old 5th December 2013
  #20
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Eight foot ceilings means a no go on the overheads. If you get them close to the ceiling then you get reflection in a bad way, if you lower them then they are basically just cymbal close mics. Try getting your balance and tone with as FEW mics as possible. Dynamic mics will pick up less of the room. Add reverb at the mix stage. As for the room sound, you are stuck with it even with close micing so move the drums around in the room to find the best spot. Use your matress / sofa as gobos if needed to cut down bad echo / comb filtering. Set aside plenty of time to experiment and you will figure out a workable solution.
Old 5th December 2013
  #21
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herecomesyourman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassmankr View Post
Eight foot ceilings means a no go on the overheads. If you get them close to the ceiling then you get reflection in a bad way, if you lower them then they are basically just cymbal close mics. Try getting your balance and tone with as FEW mics as possible. Dynamic mics will pick up less of the room. Add reverb at the mix stage. As for the room sound, you are stuck with it even with close micing so move the drums around in the room to find the best spot. Use your matress / sofa as gobos if needed to cut down bad echo / comb filtering. Set aside plenty of time to experiment and you will figure out a workable solution.
Maybe try "underhead" techniques instead? Good points.
Old 5th December 2013
  #22
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chrisrulesmore's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassmankr View Post
Eight foot ceilings means a no go on the overheads. If you get them close to the ceiling then you get reflection in a bad way, if you lower them then they are basically just cymbal close mics. Try getting your balance and tone with as FEW mics as possible. Dynamic mics will pick up less of the room. Add reverb at the mix stage. As for the room sound, you are stuck with it even with close micing so move the drums around in the room to find the best spot. Use your matress / sofa as gobos if needed to cut down bad echo / comb filtering. Set aside plenty of time to experiment and you will figure out a workable solution.
In this case, I would suggest hanging some GIK acoustic panels over the kit. You can either get the screw in hooks and hang them from the ceiling or have them balancing on two garment racks on either side of the kit up above. This will serve to stop the early reflections and disappear the low ceiling dramatically. This is super easy and cheap and will probably do more to improve the acoustics of your space and quality of recording than any piece of gear you mentioned.

Best,
Chris
Old 5th December 2013
  #23
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Ntk drummer's Avatar
 

Trapping the ceiling seems like a great idea. I personally hate early reflections from the cymbals bring prominent on a drum sound. The player looses so many nuances in their phrasing.
Old 5th December 2013
  #24
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herecomesyourman's Avatar
I don't go with Pensado's videos as examples often...but this video of Ian MacGregor and Greg Wells going through how they track drums is really interesting and might work really well in your space.

They use some mics as "underheads" here...maybe you should take a closer look at that, while also taking the advice to trap the ceilings a bit.

Old 5th December 2013
  #25
Quote:
Originally Posted by herecomesyourman View Post

This video of Ian MacGregor and Greg Wells going through how they track drums is really interesting and might work really well in your space.
Cary, I know this video, nevertheless thanks !!

Absolutely stunning drumsound, isn't it?

A great engineer !! and of course, a lot of brilliant and expensive analog equipment.

R.
Old 13th December 2013
  #26
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imacgreg's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenclaw View Post
Please let me know what you guys would choose to do in this space and situation. Thanks so much.
I would set the drums up as you've described and start there. If I were you (and I am not), I would still setup normal overheads and see where that got me. If it sucked, I might try something else like the underheads. Low ceilings (within reason) aren't necessarily a bad thing. Some of the best drum sounds I've got were in "normal" rooms with 10-12 foot ceilings. It sounds like you're aware of possible acoustic issues. You never know if a room is going to be "magic" or not until you start hitting record and listening back.

Underheads aren't some sort of magic cure. They actually can cause more problem than they fix if done improperly. They can be a pain in the ass. They often lead to me running back and forth between control and live room, which doesn't agree with my pear-shaped physique. They can be jaw droppingly cool. I've used them enough times to know the vibe they impart and will start with them only if it makes sense once I've heard the song/style.

Try some things and then try some other things and often, you'll find one of those things is pretty fun. Follow your nose (ears).
Old 13th December 2013
  #27
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herecomesyourman's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rolf Ebitsch View Post
Cary, I know this video, nevertheless thanks !!

Absolutely stunning drumsound, isn't it?

A great engineer !! and of course, a lot of brilliant and expensive analog equipment.

R.
Oh you're welcome! (But I would really thank the man who made this next post.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by imacgreg View Post
I would set the drums up as you've described and start there. If I were you (and I am not), I would still setup normal overheads and see where that got me. If it sucked, I might try something else like the underheads. Low ceilings (within reason) aren't necessarily a bad thing. Some of the best drum sounds I've got were in "normal" rooms with 10-12 foot ceilings. It sounds like you're aware of possible acoustic issues. You never know if a room is going to be "magic" or not until you start hitting record and listening back.

Underheads aren't some sort of magic cure. They actually can cause more problem than they fix if done improperly. They can be a pain in the ass. They often lead to me running back and forth between control and live room, which doesn't agree with my pear-shaped physique. They can be jaw droppingly cool. I've used them enough times to know the vibe they impart and will start with them only if it makes sense once I've heard the song/style.

Try some things and then try some other things and often, you'll find one of those things is pretty fun. Follow your nose (ears).

Hi Ian! I really enjoyed that video a lot. Some good ideas in there. I'm glad to see you post here on the subject though. I'd never thought of "underheads" as something you could pull off until I read about people raving over this technique after you made that video.

What kinds of material (songs/styles) do you tend to gravitate towards when you do use this technique? (If you don't mind me asking that is.)
Old 13th December 2013
  #28
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imacgreg's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by herecomesyourman View Post
What kinds of material (songs/styles) do you tend to gravitate towards when you do use this technique? (If you don't mind me asking that is.)
Hmmm... It's tough to give a definite answer. But I feel that the underheads give a "tighter" sound while traditional overheads give a sound with a bit more space around them. It really depends on the song or the type of performance.

The last 3 drum sessions I did were for punk bands and I ended up going with over the top cymbal mics (414s) as that gave me more control over the cymbals without making things too washy.
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