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Drum recording technique
Old 22nd May 2006
  #1
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tomwehrle's Avatar
 

Drum recording technique

Hey, I just ran across this pic, apparently Michael W Smith is working on a cd project...anyways, I saw this and wondered if it's normal to place a blanket over the kick drum like is shown in this candid pic of the recording process...is it?
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Drum recording technique-drum-recording.jpg  
Old 22nd May 2006
  #2
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tamasdragon's Avatar
 

It's absolutely normal, we do it regulary.
Regards Tamas Dragon
Old 22nd May 2006
  #3
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tomwehrle's Avatar
 

does it keep the kick drum out of the overheads more, or what exactly is the idea...i've never done it
Old 22nd May 2006
  #4
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jenkel16's Avatar
 

I think it's the other way around, to keep the cymbals out of a mic placed in front of the kick drum. A blanket is not going to stop the low frequencies from a kick.
Old 22nd May 2006
  #5
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Well, it keeps the kickdrum warm, doesn't it? The warm sound, you know. Sometimes I like to put up the mic in front of the kick a bit further away to catch more low end and this keeps the cymbals from bleeding in too much. You even can build a whole tunnel if you like. The other musicians will trip over and crash it anyway...
Old 22nd May 2006
  #6
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Bishbashbosh's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by frans
Well, it keeps the kickdrum warm, doesn't it?

heh


Usually a blanket is too thin. A very heavy duvet is a much better bet.
This practice started in the 60's, when close miking drums started, but drummers always had a solid front head.... you'd get loads of bleed from the other intruments into the kick mic, and sympathetic resonance with the bass on the kick's front head (damping of the kick didn't really start till the late 60's).
Nowadays it's used to stop the cymbals leaking into the front of kick mic so you can compress it to hell if you want to!!

The very best thing to use if there's one available is a leather grand piano cover.
Old 22nd May 2006
  #7
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Nutmeg II.'s Avatar
 

There is another benefit besite the "keep the cymbales out of the fok mic".
The tom mic do get less or no reflections from the kick, so there is less comb filter action in the tom mics.
Old 22nd May 2006
  #8
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I do it or something like it usually... and it IS to keep the bass drum out of everything else; especially room mics.

Not the other way round.
Old 22nd May 2006
  #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by wwittman
I do it or something like it usually... and it IS to keep the bass drum out of everything else; especially room mics.

Not the other way round.
Really?? Not questioning your method or mind set (your credits speak for themselves and who the hell am I) but I find it to help with both the room mics and keeping the cymbals out of the close kick mic. The blanket or tunnel works both ways right? I mean it stops sound from entering in as much as it does going out so I find that it helps separate the kick as a whole unit.

To the original post about is it "normal" to do this? I would say it is to some degree but it is not a must. It is like everything else, depends on the room / drums / drummer / song / equipment / phase of the moon.

I did the kick tunnel dance for years but in my new room, and now that I have been using an SM91 on the floor of the kick I find it is not so important for me. As always YMMV, you have to try it for yourself.
Old 22nd May 2006
  #10
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max cooper's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wwittman
I do it or something like it usually... and it IS to keep the bass drum out of everything else; especially room mics.

Not the other way round.
Boom! If you have a stomper, the kick can sound really weird by the time you get the rest of the kit sounding cool. It all depends.

Of course that doesn't take into account how much comes of the back of the beater head. (Insert joke)

In that book by Bruce Swieden, there's a picture of a quilted kick drum cover he had made. Seems less obtrusive.
Old 22nd May 2006
  #11
You Must Be From Suffolk

Quote:
Originally Posted by wwittman
I do it or something like it usually... and it IS to keep the bass drum out of everything else; especially room mics.

Not the other way round.
Funny that's what us jolly British chaps do it for. Long time since I have seen any
"Outfield" chaps round Ipswich way.
Regards.•:*¨¨*:•. ¸¸.•´¯`•.Mark Fairfax-Harwood, Engineer Springvale Studios
Old 23rd May 2006
  #12
Ken
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it's a great place to hide the pot- the drummer never thinks to look there!

-and it keeps the cymbals out of the kick whilst allowing you to get a more diffuse/real kick drum sound
Old 23rd May 2006
  #13
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RoundBadge's Avatar
If you make the tunnel long enough,It's a great place to take naps during downtime..
very cozy..
Old 23rd May 2006
  #14
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoundBadge
If you make the tunnel long enough,It's a great place to take naps during downtime..
very cozy..
Don't laugh, I have really done this before..... and I am not joking.
Old 23rd May 2006
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by not_so_new
Don't laugh, I have really done this before..... and I am not joking.
Neither am i..
Old 23rd May 2006
  #16
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RKrizman's Avatar
 

If the kick needs a lot of high end eq the snare leakage in the kick mic will get boosted to an objectionable level. At least that's why I sometimes blanket the kick.

-R
Old 23rd May 2006
  #17
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magellan's Avatar
we use the technique often, as in the photo below from a session yesterday. under the blanket layers on the right is a heavy braided-wool basket housing an LDC. it's about 5' back, and works well for capturing the 'whoomp'...Drum recording technique-wlw-bass-drum.jpg
Old 24th May 2006
  #18
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Sigma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by wwittman
I do it or something like it usually... and it IS to keep the bass drum out of everything else; especially room mics.

Not the other way round.
really??? hmmmm... maybe that 's how you worked but we always used it to keep BD mic isolated from rest of kit. different strokes for different folks and missions..
Old 24th May 2006
  #19
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tomwehrle's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by magellan
we use the technique often, as in the photo below from a session yesterday. under the blanket layers on the right is a heavy braided-wool basket housing an LDC. it's about 5' back, and works well for capturing the 'whoomp'...Attachment 20225
You still place a mic inside the kick though right?
That's the only way I've recorded a kick drum...
Old 24th May 2006
  #20
84K
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We made a tunnel out of left over Auralex and we keep it in place by throwing a duvet cover on it. Right now there is a 421 inside facing the beater, and a Subkick just outside. Both under the cover. Quite.
Old 24th May 2006
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magellan
we use the technique often, as in the photo below from a session yesterday. under the blanket layers on the right is a heavy braided-wool basket housing an LDC. it's about 5' back, and works well for capturing the 'whoomp'...Attachment 20225
That's a cosy way of killing a kick drum. Kidding... heh
Old 25th May 2006
  #22
Ken
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The Yamaha "subkick" rocks !

I used it with a jazz trio - soft drumming, and believe it or not, the subkick really gets that low presence so the kick is "there" without being too obtrusive.

Doesn't need "the tunnel" cause it doesn't pick up high end anyway!

I know many guys use it for a heavy drum sound, but its great on the soft stuff too...

if you've used one you know that output is no problem either.
Old 25th May 2006
  #23
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Jim Keltner

Speaking of great drum sounds and drummers. I saw Jim Keltner with T-Bone Bunett, Marc Ribot and few other great players last night. Keltner gets such a magnificent tone. I believe alot of the micing on his kit was his own doing. He had a mic attached to the top of his kick that angled slightly down to the top right portion of his kick. Sounded really great.
Old 25th May 2006
  #24
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magellan's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by joemeekfreak
You still place a mic inside the kick though right?
That's the only way I've recorded a kick drum...
yes, for that project there was also an AKG D112 inside the bass drum.
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