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Overheads L & R or R & L?
Old 21st May 2006
  #1
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Overheads L & R or R & L?

Yes, I'm a low-end guy, but I'm hoping for an industry-standard answer, so I'm posting this here instead of the LE forum...

Very quick question:

When tracking stereo overheads on a kit, do you mark Overhead Left as YOUR left, or the DRUMMER's left (assuming you're facing the drummer).

Or to put it another way, is the LEFT monitor playing the DRUMMER'S left, or the AUDIENCE'S left?

I'm not asking about how you mix the final project, just wondering if there's an industry-standard that's followed...

Danka!
Old 21st May 2006
  #2
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kingneeraj's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by muxlow
When tracking stereo overheads on a kit, do you mark Overhead Left as YOUR left, or the DRUMMER's left (assuming you're facing the drummer).

Or to put it another way, is the LEFT monitor playing the DRUMMER'S left, or the AUDIENCE'S left?
Danka!
There is no such industry standard... each engineer has their own personal way...

I would say.. whichever one you decide to do- just STICK with it!
Old 21st May 2006
  #3
Gear Addict
Being a (RH) drummer, I give it my perspective (HH left, Floor tom right).
Old 21st May 2006
  #4
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drmmrboy's Avatar
 

I've always been a drummers perspective kinda guy. But hey, I'm a drummer. Lately I've tried to go audience perspective, and it felt weird at first, but if I start off that way, and stick to it, I'm cool.

But hey, is it really the audience's perspective, or just a left handed drummer?
------
Old 21st May 2006
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drmmrboy
I've always been a drummers perspective kinda guy. But hey, I'm a drummer. Lately I've tried to go audience perspective, and it felt weird at first, but if I start off that way, and stick to it, I'm cool.

But hey, is it really the audience's perspective, or just a left handed drummer?
------
haha to rod morgenstein.

'Why is he playing a right handed kit?' heh

I always go drummer's perspective. This works well for me. And yes, I am a drummer.

If you got a headphone setup that is coming off the stereo bus, this is a good way to set up drums. That way, the drummer is hearing things in the proper sides of the headphones.
Old 21st May 2006
  #6
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max cooper's Avatar
 

Mono drums!
Old 21st May 2006
  #7
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seaneldon's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by phaqu
Being a (RH) drummer, I give it my perspective (HH left, Floor tom right).
i tend to never do this. i go from audience perspective. the only instrument i ever record/mix from the player's perspective is acoustic piano. bass notes on the left, higher notes on the right. just sounds downright wrong the other way around.
Old 21st May 2006
  #8
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AlexLakis's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by seaneldon
i tend to never do this. i go from audience perspective. the only instrument i ever record/mix from the player's perspective is acoustic piano. bass notes on the left, higher notes on the right. just sounds downright wrong the other way around.
Yeah, pretty much. With drums, I try to pan the mics as I'm seeing them thru the glass. I usually pan the toms as I hear them thru the overheads. I find I end up with a sound that sounds not only beefier, but more natural.

Another note is that I find myself not hardpanning drums these days. Lends to a more focused kick/snare sound, I find.
Old 21st May 2006
  #9
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Jason Poulin's Avatar
 

it's just a matter of preference.


it's your decision (and the bands/producer)



Jason
Old 21st May 2006
  #10
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s_sibs's Avatar
 

I tend to track with the drummers' perspective since he might find it sounding strange in his cans if things are backwards. Then when mixing I might change things around...I'm not a drummer but I like drummers' perspective better for some reason...must be because I like air drummin'.

Old 21st May 2006
  #11
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mwagener's Avatar
I always use audience perspective, the drummer is the only guy in the world who hears it the other way around (well, maybe the drum tech too...)
Old 21st May 2006
  #12
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RedWallStudio's Avatar
 

I'll patch the overheads into my mic snake from the drummers perspective, but then I'll cross patch the left to the right and the right to the left on my patchbay, and then I'll pan them the opposite way on the console. But when I finally go to the two mix, I'll cross patch those again so the left goes to the right and visa versa. And just for laughs, everything out of my two mix goes into one Y cable and becomes mono in the end... so none of it will matter anyhow. And if I get really bored some days, I'll mute the overheads all together. Its fun for me, and interesting to see if any band members ever notice any of it.fuuck
Old 21st May 2006
  #13
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mwagener
I always use audience perspective, the drummer is the only guy in the world who hears it the other way around (well, maybe the drum tech too...)
Yep. I'm a drummer and I alway mix audience perspective. I lable the kit as I view it - not from behind the kit but looking at it, which as an engineer I'm always doing. (not playing anymore).

BTW, it's weird to see a music video with drums mixed from the drummers perspective...he plays left to right but you see right to left.

If you do mix drums from a drummers perspective, then make sure the kick is barely there and the snare is panned a little left. Make sure the amps are duller too.

David Brown
Old 21st May 2006
  #14
I like drummer perspective but some projects and clients need or want audience perspective so it is not always the same. Just label them 'OH' (over hat) and 'OR' (over ride) and you will never have to think about it.
Old 21st May 2006
  #15
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Brown

If you do mix drums from a drummers perspective, then make sure the kick is barely there and the snare is panned a little left. Make sure the amps are duller too.

David Brown

Hahaha! heh
Old 21st May 2006
  #16
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mixerguy's Avatar
the solution is very simple

on the tracksheet - (or in your DAW) label the tracks

OH hat side
OH lo tom side

pan them wherever you like
and it is also clear for the next person (what a concept)

done and done

Old 21st May 2006
  #17
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drmmrboy's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by s_sibs
I tend to track with the drummers' perspective since he might find it sounding strange in his cans if things are backwards.
When I'm playing I like the drums mono in the cans. It freaks me out a little if they're panned weird from my seat. I find that mono cans work for me, and anything I'm hearing straight off the kit, kinda places it for me.

I think what got me trying audience perspective, is from experimenting with different over head positions and configurations. When I pulled them up to listen, they were opposite of what I'm used to, and I just went with it. So now, occasionally, I'll go this way from the start.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexLakis
Yeah, pretty much. With drums, I try to pan the mics as I'm seeing them thru the glass.
What if the drummer is set up sideways? Say, floor closest to the glass, with hats furthest away. heh heh
Old 21st May 2006
  #18
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mtstudios@charter's Avatar
 

Audience Perspective. Sideways drummer, I would rotate him 90 degrees in the studio.

www.bluethumbproductions.com
Old 21st May 2006
  #19
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DaveH's Avatar
I’ve always followed one simple rule.

The final consumer is the audience. Everything is
done with this in mind.

Always easy to remember and stay focused on.
Old 21st May 2006
  #20
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djui5's Avatar
 

I always label them OH Snare and OH Tom....

Then whoever mixes the track can do what the hell they want.
Old 21st May 2006
  #21
Audience perspective.
Old 22nd May 2006
  #22
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there is no standard.

do it the way you like it.

plenty of engineers do it drummer perspective... of course all GOOD engineers do it audience perspective. <g>
Old 29th May 2006
  #23
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveH
I’ve always followed one simple rule.

The final consumer is the audience. Everything is
done with this in mind.

Always easy to remember and stay focused on.
Andy Johns may disagree with you. As would Paul Northfield, Dave Bottrill, Kevin Shirly and a slew of other. (Your post was probably tongue in cheeck so I give the devil horns... \m/ thumbsup
Old 29th May 2006
  #24
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wwittman
there is no standard.

do it the way you like it.

plenty of engineers do it drummer perspective... of course all GOOD engineers do it audience perspective. <g>
Just listened to my Fixx album. Drums are pretty up the middle. Maybe you didn't work on that one.heh
Old 29th May 2006
  #25
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phelbin's Avatar
 

I only do audience perspective when it's a live recording. Otherwise, I always do drummer perspective...it just sounds weird to me any other way...and no one has ever asked me to change it.
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