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eurythmics what console Summing Mixers
Old 3rd January 2011
  #1
eurythmics what console

I I think it was a soundcraft console for there first album and sec but witch one
I was thinking of a console that is not expensive and better then my mixdream just looking for options
Old 3rd January 2011
  #2
Lives for gear
 
Studerfreak's Avatar
 

It is not the console that makes a hit record or million seller......
There are other parameters contributing to succes.
Talent is one of them, luck another one.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #3
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Studerfreak View Post
It is not the console that makes a hit record or million seller......
There are other parameters contributing to succes.
Talent is one of them, luck another one.
Giving an answer that doesn't go off on a tangent, while totally ignoring the question, is yet another.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #4
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by spektor View Post
I I think it was a soundcraft console for there first album and sec but witch one
I was thinking of a console that is not expensive and better then my mixdream just looking for options
I think the series 600 was Soundcraft that a lot of people used, but I'm not sure about it. There were a bunch of them in use and you could probably find one.

If you're looking for a used console, TAC Scorpion or Trident 65 [or 24] would be other contenders. The Trident is probably the best of the lot soundwise. Or maybe you could find an mci?

For new stuff, just look around over at Vintage King's website. There are a few new companies making decent mid-level consoles.

If you have the money, the new API stuff is probably good, but at that point you could probably start thinking about a Neve. They have some good new stuff too.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #5
Lives for gear
Recording studio & gear used on the album Sweet Dreams

"Their "studio" was a dingy, v-shaped warehouse attic. No acoustical tiles, no drum booth, no double-sealed glass window; they played and sang in the same room with their tape deck and mixing board, which were a TEAC half-inch 8-track and a cheap, used Soundcraft, respectively. For microphones, they had two Beyers, which they used to record everything - Annie's voice, trumpets, percussion, the piano - and for outboard processing gear they had a handful of old effects boxes, a space echo, and one (count it, one) spring reverb. They made the Sweet Dreams album with that" (source: Eurythmics Features and Articles).

Attached below is the full article,which is very interesting:

Eurythmics - Anything Goes

By FREFF

Musician, November 1983

By now you've heard Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This) on the radio. Maybe you've even bought the album of the same name. And I will bet good green American folding money that you think Eurythmics is a synthesizer band, and that Annie Lennox does the singing and Dave Stewart does all the playing. Why shouldn't you? I mean, it's what all the reviews say. It's what the bio from RCA, their record company, says. It also happens to be dead wrong.

Of course, lack of truth has never derailed a convenient preconception. But when the truth is wild and eccentric and even a little revolutionary, ah! That's quite another thing. So read on. The next time you listen to Sweet Dreams, remember to listen for the milk bottles.

There's a certain standardized ritual to the making of a record. You do your demos, work out arrangements with the band, practice until you've got them down cold, and then Go Into The Studio. There you spend an hour getting the drum sound together (only an hour, if you're lucky), an hour on the bass, an hour on the guitar, and another hour trying to regain the enthusiasm you had when you'd walked in four hours before, and finally, frustrated and sweaty and beaucoup bucks poorer, you walk out with a take you can't stand but which the engineer assures you can be "fixed in the mix." Only it never can.

Dave and Annie found a better way.

Actually, they didn't have much choice. After splitting from the Tourists in 1980 and making "In the Garden", their first album as Eurythmics, at Conny Plank's West German studio, they ran into nerve-shattering management troubles. By the time everything settled out and they were free of entanglement, they were also free of useful things like money and a recording contract.


Desperate times call for desperate measures. "I dressed up like a businessman - I had a briefcase and everything - and went down to our local bank manager," recalls Dave. "I told him that Annie and I were going to do something absolutely amazing and that the bank should invest in us. I made the point that most bands spend thirty thousand pounds just recording one album, but that we could buy the equipment we needed for seven thousand and then make all the albums we wanted." The bank manager didn't know a microphone from a macrame, but Dave's figures and track record and sheer chutzpah convinced him that the chance was worth taking. Of course, Dave never mentioned the fact that they'd never engineered a recording studio in their lives.... Their "studio" was a dingy, v-shaped warehouse attic. No acoustical tiles, no drum booth, no double-sealed glass window; they played and sang in the same room with their tape deck and mixing board, which were a TEAC half-inch 8-track and a cheap, used Soundcraft, respectively. For microphones, they had two Beyers, which they used to record everything - Annie's voice, trumpets, percussion, the piano - and for outboard processing gear they had a handful of old effects boxes, a space echo, and one (count it, one) spring reverb. They made the Sweet Dreams album with that. Go and listen to it. It sounds like it was recorded in the finest of two-hundred-dollar-an-hour rooms, instead of a place most people would barely credit with demo capability. Raw talent and no pressure from the time clock are two reasonable explanations for that disparity, but at the heart of the record's sonic success is a different attitude about recording. No more "fix it in the mix." Instead it was get the sound right, no matter how long it took, and then record it flat. And if it didn't sound right later, scrub it and do it again. Having fun counted, too. That's something Annie and Dave learned from Conny Plank, back when they'd been working on In The Garden.
This is how Dave remembers it: "Conny and his partner Holger took me aside one day to show me what they were doing-all these weird, obscure experiments. They'd make rhythm tracks out of tape loops of pinball machine counters, and add a bass drum even though they couldn't play drums, and then they'd play some kind of scratchy violin part all the way through and I'd say, 'what the hell, that sounds terrible.' But they'd never use it like that. They'd kind of switch it in and out, and then run it through a space echo, and phase it. ..and it would sound really great. Compared to that, everything I'd ever done in a band seemed boring. I could see them running around, rubbing their hands with glee, and getting real excited - and these were forty year-old men! They were like kids with paint pots and a blank canvas, They could do anything."

Annie and Dave started doing anything, too. And a whole lot of people came round and caught the bug. The Specials recorded in the attic, as did Jimmy Destri and Clem Burke of Blondie. To them, it was toytown: a place to relax and go crazy. In and around recordings for Sweet Dreams the most bizarre sessions went on, such as improvisational jams with Clem Burke on drums, Adam Powell of Selector playing dub bass, and Dave's stepfather (an ex-Jesuit priest turned Buddhist) exclaiming haiku poetry in French. Dave even started dragging total strangers in off the street, people who had never even seen a tape deck, let alone thought of recording a song, and setting to work with them. "This is a synthesizer, and this is a tape echo, and when you press this button then... I trust you begin to get the picture. Just to make it concrete, here are a few examples from the album: -There's lots of stuff you'd guess was synthesizer that isn't. That string sound in "The Walk"? A Farfisa Combo. Compact through the spring reverb. The clinking counterpoint in the chorus of "Sweet Dreams"? Milk bottles pitched to the right notes by filling them with different levels of water. And the weird, rattling feedback along with the train noise in "The City Never Sleeps" is just that: feedback, To get the environment they wanted, Dave and Annie bought subway tickets and stood on the platform, recording the trains going by with a little Walkman-Iike tape machine. When they got back they found they didn't have any open tracks left on the Teac, so to get the trains into the song, they added them directly into the 2-track master during mixdown. The clicking of the wheels caught Dave's ear. To him it sounded a little like guitar feedback. So he grabbed his Gretch Country Gentleman, plugged it in, held it in front of the monitor speakers so it would pick up on the clicking and start feeding back for real... and he submixed that in, too.

- That same trick was used for most of Annie's multiple harmonies. Since there were no clear tracks, she sang them during mixdown, standing next to the mixing board with earphones on. Part of the rhythm track from "Love Is A Stranger" is an unusual, on-the-downbeat grunting sound. That's a reverb-processed chef from a neighborhood restaurant, one of the novices Dave pulled in off the street. All the piano on the record is there by fortunate coincidence. The floor below their attic was occupied by a frame-making company, owned by a man who was an avid pianist; so avid, in fact. that he'd installed a grand piano in the shop so he could practice before work every morning. Annie and Dave got permission to use it after hours. They ran their two Beyer mikes down on long cables, set up a talkback system so they could cue each other, and then played all the piano parts by flashlight (the regular lights having been shut on at night). -Many, many. sound chains. Even though their Movement Audio Visual drum computer (an English instrument not in general release yet) used digitally-recorded drums, they weren't quite right. So, Dave says, "we'd do things like send the snare out to trigger a white noise, send the white noise through a phaser and send just the phased version of the white noise through a repeat echo... or something like that. Sometimes we had the most outrageous connections. A real engineer would have been appalled."

But it worked. Two world-wide hit singles and a hit album, followed up by a three-song EP ("Who's That Girl?") that has so far sold 400.000 copies in England and Europe alone. All that success, of course, has meant expansion. Not long ago, Dave and Annie bought an old church and converted it to a 24-track studio, complete with goodies like a Lexicon delay and a Harmonizer (though they still have only two Beyer mikes). Question of the day: will extra track space kill that wild, simplicity-enforced creativity? Apparently not, Whew.

"We're still banging metal bottles together I mean, the very first thing we recorded in the place," laughs Dave, "was a ukulele submixed with a Roland Juno 60. It's all in the brain, you know, not in the equipment." If there are two things that Annie and Dave unquestionably agree on, it's a) they are total opposites, and it's that difference that makes Eurythmics work, and b) by the time a song is finished, they can't tell who did what anymore.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Telefunk's Avatar
 

Thanks for the nice article.

Shows that about 99% comes from the combination of talent and know-how. 1% is gear, max.

If you listen Sweet Dreams you will hear that it would not have sounded much different if it was recorded in a million dollar studio. Nice...
Old 3rd January 2011
  #7
I love articles like that; it brings me back to reality, and the simple joy of recording, as opposed to lust.

Whenever my lust exceeds myy budget, I think, "If I went back in time and got together with Martin, Emerick and The Beatles, could we have made magic with my current gear?"

Talent is 99%. I wish I had me some.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #8
Lives for gear
 
Telefunk's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic Alex View Post
"If I went back in time and got together with Martin, Emerick and The Beatles, could we have made magic with my current gear?"
The answer is yes. With a crew like Martin, Emerick & The boys, you can do anything with any setup. Actually, it could be that i'm wrong, it's 100% talent & knowledge how to cut the ****.
Old 3rd January 2011
  #9
It's that conclusion that curbs my lust. Like the Eurythmics article....my setup is waaaay beyond what they had. So why haven't I recorded a hit like 'Sweet Dreams'?

The answer is obvious, and humbling.
Old 4th January 2011
  #10
Lives for gear
I just listened to Sweet Dreams on youtube and the milk bottle sounds work really well. It is amazing to think the only two mics they had to record everything with were Beyer mics. Phil Collins also used a Beyer M88 mic on In the Air Tonight (Classic Tracks: Phil Collins' "In the Air Tonight")
Old 4th January 2011
  #11
Lives for gear
 

All talent, no quality. That track is sonically HORRIBLE... Annie is an incredible singer and Dave a phenomenal producer/writer but that original track is sonically pretty poor.

Its the fact that its a RIDICULOUSLY good song with great emotion and innovative PERFORMANCE that make it great. And I have no idea why everyone has always pretended that it was a sonic masterpiece- its absolutely not.

This is where a great song bleeds into the production myths. Take the original track and put it up against ANY track you think is well engineered. Not a great song, a great recording. Literally, DO IT FOR YOURSELF and try to be CRITICAL.

The original track sounds anemic and its the songwriting and perfomance that make EVERYTHING.

Next time you listen, REALLY LISTEN. Don't just give them the benefit of the doubt. That track is seriously sonically lacking.

Many of the tracks that hit huge in the 80s, were great songs- not great recordings.

BTW- Sweet Dreams is one of my favorite songs of all time. It killed me when it was released and still does. The song/performance is that good- it overcame a crap recording. Thats also nothing new- great songs do that all the time.

But that has nothing to do with a great recording. And in the case of such monster talent, the recording has gained undue respect.

They could have recorded that on a cassette deck with an sm57, no fx, and STILL gone Platinum- the song was that good, and they were that good. But that does NOT make a great piece of engineering.

Flame on.
Old 4th January 2011
  #12
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by McDingus View Post
They could have recorded that on a cassette deck with an sm57, no fx, and STILL gone Platinum- the song was that good, and they were that good. But that does NOT make a great piece of engineering.
I'd hate to hear it if it had been well-engineered then! You can't improve perfection.
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