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ID an AKG mic for me please Condenser Microphones
Old 2nd January 2011
  #1
Lives for gear
ID an AKG mic for me please

Howdy

I did a recording around 1996 / 1997 where the engineer used a great sounding AKG mic. I always wanted to know what that mic was and recently I bumped into this engineer so I asked him.

Unfortunately he couldn't remember the model, but I did establish the following:

I assumed it was a condensor mic but he said it was a capacitor? It was a long thin mic, not like an LDC. It might have been black and it might have had some kind of interchangable capsule system. Once plugged in it took a while to 'warm up' - he mentioned '15' but I can't recall if he said secs or mins. Probably secs, 15 mins seems a long time.

It was worth about £1500, but I'm not sure if he meant that would be it's value now, or if that's what it cost - in the early / mid 90s.

It sounded very good. Very airy and highly sensitive. Sounded fantasic on acoustic guitar but we also used it for lead vox.

I've googled AKG mics but it may be discontinued as I couldn't pinpoint which mic it might be.

Any ideas??

Cheers, oh and happy new year!
Old 2nd January 2011
  #2
Lives for gear
 
DarkSky Media's Avatar
Capacitor mic is an alternate (and somewhat antiquated or quaint) name for what is now generally referred to as a condenser mic.

The warm-up time would point to it being a tube condenser mic (ie with a tube-based amplifier in the mic itself, and therefore an external dedicated power supply).

The shape of the mic and your description of the sound are suggestive of an AKG C12, although they're typically seen with a silver body, not black. I don't know if there was ever a black variant (doubtless others will chime in to clarify this point).
Old 2nd January 2011
  #3
Lives for gear
Hey, thanks for your response.

Further investigation is leading me to think it could be the C460b. Opinions on this mic suggest it's close to the sound I mentioned.
Old 2nd January 2011
  #4
Lives for gear
 

a 460 or 480 with one of the available shotgun capsules would be long, thin, black, and in about that pricerange.
Old 2nd January 2011
  #5
Lives for gear
 
softwareguy's Avatar
 

The warmup does suggest tube, which would suggest that it might have been a C28, C60 or C61. These all have silver bodies, however.

Was it side address or end address? If side, C12 is likely.

If it was definitely black I think you're on the right path with the 460/480 line of thought.
Old 2nd January 2011
  #6
c28a/b/c's, c-60's, and c61's were all available with a dark matt finish...for film/tv, it is greyis and might be perceived as black...
451/452's were also available in black...
460's were stock in black...

Nobody thinks of a c12 as thin, or not like a LDC, and I have never seen a c12 in a dark finish, 251's yes, but not a c12.

Almost every vintage tube neuman sdc were available in a dark finish...

Only the nuvistor and tube mic's require a warmup of 15minutes [an hr + really], although many things sound better after being on for awhile, even solid state stuff...

Good luck!
Old 3rd January 2011
  #7
Gear Guru
 
John Willett's Avatar
 

ID an AKG mic for me please

Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkSky Media
Capacitor mic is an alternate (and somewhat antiquated or quaint) name for what is now generally referred to as a condenser mic.
Actually capacitor is the modern name and condenser is the old name.

What we call a capacitor nowadays used to be called a condenser in the old days.

But the old name has stuck when it comes to microphones.

Condenser and capacitor are interchangeable terms.


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Old 3rd January 2011
  #8
Lives for gear
 
DarkSky Media's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Willett View Post
Actually capacitor is the modern name and condenser is the old name.
Hi John,

More generally, that is true, yes. Like you, I can remember back to when the term condenser was in general use. Then that gave way to the term capacitor, and for a time folk also applied that term to microphones that had formerly been termed condenser mics.

However the earlier term for mics "stuck" and the term "capacitor mic" seems to have largely slipped out of use, so that now it has been out-of-fashion long enough to be considered quaint IMO. Hence my comment.
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