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How do the low-mids translate on the Barefoot MM27?
Old 14th December 2010
  #1
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How do the low-mids translate on the Barefoot MM27?

I have been reading on some threads that the MM27 are a little bit "relaxed" in the low-mids and I'm just wondering if those of you who have had them for a while find it a challenge to pick up on low mid build up and dial in the right amount when you mix? how are your mixes translating with these monitors in this region?

I do understand that monitors and hearing are highly subjective. One needs to learn their monitors and room... and learn how to hear and adjust. I also get the well treated room/speaker response aspect. But I'm just curious if any of you have found it challenging with these particular monitors and how they are voiced? ... and if you feel the need to use the select switch in the back?
Old 15th December 2010
  #2
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Hi nas,

The feedback I get from my customers is that the lower midrange character (or lack of character) of the MM27 makes it easier to dial in this region rather than more challenging as you suggest. Here is quote from an older post of mine that explains why the MM27 lower mids are typically more revealing than many other monitors: K+h o300 vs barefoot

Quote:
Originally Posted by barefoot View Post
I can only speak for my monitors. But the MM27's are often described as sounding more restrained in the lower mids and upper bass than many speakers. And I agree. A common feature of many monitors is to have a single driver span the range from the lowest frequencies up into the midrange. Considering the power and excursion required for deep bass response, this is a very difficult task. It necessarily results in a compromise between the woofer's higher and lower frequency performance. This is especially true for 2-ways. Such a driver usually winds up generating a significant amount of harmonic distortion from its lowest range. And the harmonics of these low frequencies land smack in the upper bass and lower midrange. This is the frequency range our ears typically associate with punch or growl (MaxxBass takes advantage of this effect by generating low frequency harmonics). Ports have a tendency to ring pipe organ resonances into the upper bass and low mids as well. So, the speakers essentially generate their own punch rather than telling you exactly what's in the mix itself.

The MM27 subs have a lot of surface area and a lot of excursion capability - both qualities that are great for lows, but tend to work against good midrange performance. But they don't care because, after all, they are dedicated to the lows. So they have excellent linearity within their range and don't bleed as much harmonic distortion into the upper frequencies. Sealed boxes also don't generate pipe organ resonances. Furthermore, the midbass drivers are relived from low frequency duties. So they can be optimized and perform better within their range. To make a long story short, the MM27s don't punch or growl unless the mix punches or growls.
Hope this helps!
Old 18th December 2010
  #3
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Thanks for your response Thomas... yes i know that thread very well and have read your post on it a few times. So does the select switch in the back actually bump up the lower-mids a bit.. is this restrained character you are referring to one of the reasons why you opted for an alternative response of your monitors when this option is engaged?
Old 26th December 2010
  #4
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Thought I'd bump this and see if I can get a little more feedback from experienced users... and with over 500 views of this post so far, it looks like I'm not the only one who's interested...
Old 27th December 2010
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Player1

Ok, I'll bite! I have had my Barefoot's for about two years now and I would say this was the best monitoring decision I've made. These monitors are very accurate in my room, I bought them solve a previous problem so I was careful not to trust any monitors until I could use them for a while. Well, it's been I while and I can tell you that I love them and can trust them completely! No low mid problems and I don't need to use the switch in the back either. These monitors translate very well in other monitoring situations and work for any application I've needed. I have a very real full frequency range to monitor and they give me all the dynamic range of the mix to make decisions. I have heard much better imaging from left to right and front to rear, I can manage low frequencies better than ever and with confidence. That's my story after two years of use. For me I have no desire to look any further for monitoring.
Old 27th December 2010
  #6
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If you do a search you will see how I feel about these speakers.

What Player1 said was spot on.

All I can say is I installed them out at Black Dog studios and anything that is recorded there translated EXACTLY to the B&W N802's in my mastering room at Silvertone. I don't hear this happen with too many speakers. In fact the Barefoots were the first I ever heard to do that and I've used/owned a lot of high end speaker systems.

I've bought two pairs so far (for BD studios)... the engineers love them!
Old 28th December 2010
  #7
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Cool now we're getting somewhere. Thanks for the feedback.

Silvertone I have indeed read several of your posts and have a good idea how you feel about the Barefoots. Didin't you have that fire at your studio some time ago? I take it you went ahead and replaced your old pair with a new pair.

Player1 I've also read several of your past postings but I'm glad that you addressed the specific issue of how the low-mids are translating as that was my main concern. As mentioned, I have read on several threads that the low-mids on the Barefoots are a little "relaxed" and so I was just wondering if some of the experienced owners of these monitors felt (or even noticed this at all )... and if this presented any problems in making subtle EQ adjustments or translation in this frequency range.. so far it looks like it might be quite the opposite.
Old 29th December 2010
  #8
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Player1

Quote:
Originally Posted by nas View Post
Cool now we're getting somewhere. Thanks for the feedback.

Player1 I've also read several of your past postings but I'm glad that you addressed the specific issue of how the low-mids are translating as that was my main concern. As mentioned, I have read on several threads that the low-mids on the Barefoots are a little "relaxed" and so I was just wondering if some of the experienced owners of these monitors felt (or even noticed this at all )... and if this presented any problems in making subtle EQ adjustments or translation in this frequency range.. so far it looks like it might be quite the opposite.
The first thing I would say is to take anything that anyone says with a grain of salt, including myself! I don't claim to be an expert, I can only give you my experiences in my control room. For me, the low mids are not a problem what so ever and as I said, these monitors translate in to the real world very well for me. I'm not even sure what "relaxed" in that application means (-1db,-2db, -etc at what frequency)? I can only judge from my personal experience. I hope that helps! They are great monitors for sure!
Old 8th April 2011
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barefoot View Post
Hi nas,

The feedback I get from my customers is that the lower midrange character (or lack of character) of the MM27 makes it easier to dial in this region rather than more challenging as you suggest. Here is quote from an older post of mine that explains why the MM27 lower mids are typically more revealing than many other monitors: K+h o300 vs barefoot



Hope this helps!
Hi Thomas!

I was trying to deal with mixing a bass guitar today using my S3a's, and I believe some of the confusion I was experiencing was due to the distortion you mentioned on the other thread. I've heard that particular distortion before, but I never realized it was an artifact of speaker design.

Essentially, dealing with bass guitars has been an aspect of the mixing that I have recently come to dread, and, in hopes of my life becoming a little easier, I will be picking up a used pair of MM27's from Doug McBride this weekend.

I understand that the upper mids may be a little easier to discern as well, so I'm really looking forward to that as well.

Question: I have a subwoofer (EMU 12 inch that supposedly goes down to 20Hz) that I ocasionally engage, primarily to either impress clients or simulate the kicker in the backseat experience - in other words, make it sound really stupid.

Do you think it'd be worthwhile to keep around?
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