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History of the U47 and other Famous Neumann Telefunken microphones.
Old 4th September 2010
  #1
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History of the U47 and other Famous Neumann Telefunken microphones.

Hello all,




I am in search to find a book, or any website that has all the history and details of the famous U47 microphone or any other Neumann standard studio mics (U67, M49s, Etc, etc). Hopefully the facts and not assumptions. I have found there is a book made by PPVmedian. Called "Neumann The Microphone Company". I wanted to buy this book. But having a hard time finding it and information about it. If its a good book that has information about the older vintage mics? And can it be still bought today and most importantly, is it in english.

Some questions that come to mind. What were the serial #s of the very first Big Badge U47s? If you own one pleae post your serial # as a reference if you don't mind. For example, serial #155, #186, #361 and #761 are the big badge classics.

How many were made?
What serials were telefunken badged and what were Neumann badged?

What serials had the GN107 and when did U47s start using the BV-08?

And for any other famous Neumann mics. M49s, M249s, M269Cs, U67s, whatever that are staples in the music industry still today.

I though to start this thread since there is none that I see on this topic. A thread full of information of these famous mics and only facts hopefully.

I also wonder who owns serial 001 and what does it look like?

Thanks to all.
Old 4th September 2010
  #3
Old 4th September 2010
  #4
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Salutations!!

Perhaps this will be of some assistance...While there appears to be no complete compendium (on the internet) or codex currently published regarding the finer aspects of the history of the U47 (regarding ALL of its components and identifiers), there is a solution of sorts. But first...

... to answer your questions, yes one could consider it to be a good book as it is currently endorsed by Neumann, and the author, Anselm Rößler, was given access to their more than considerable archives. However this book (appears) to be more geared towards the celebration of Neumann company via a discourse of its history. There is no indication of it containing an archival of the actual microphones (and their various iterations) histories in anything more than a general sense, therefore I presume that some-if not many-of your questions will not be answered by the acquisition of this publication (I have included PDF's of excerpts from this book). There does appear to be other useful information to be gleaned from it though. Yes it is available, in English...316 pages for 58Euros.
Here is a link to its purchase:

PPVMEDIEN Internetshop - _English books

HOWEVER... there is a more than acceptable workaround...(in my opinion).

As many may (or may not) know, Mr.Klaus Heyne will have a book published detailing a very wide body of knowledge (historic and technical) called "The vintage microphone handbook". It supposedly will contain ..."where the whole sequence and identifiers of U47 generations are laid out."

It also may or may not be common knowledge that the publication date for this book has been pushed back more than once (for reasons unknown to me). However there have been no statements from Mr.Heyne on his forum that said book is NOT going to be published. Therefore, in regards to your query....to the best of my knowledge there is none BUT there will be! I might also add that Mr.Heyne has stated on his forum that if one were to email him requesting said history he will..."copy and paste the somewhat lengthy history." This fact should also make said information immediately available, dependent upon his compliance/desire to supply it....however as he does this for "shameless self promotion" of his book I am unsure as to what stipulations he would release the desired information.

In regards to it being available on this forum, this is obviously a matter of disclosure with Mr.Heyne (IF said historic information were to come via his work). In my opinion the publication of his book would be (up till now) the most thorough single point source regarding a complete historic and technical compendium of the U47....That is if one were to believe he and his sources to be reputable (which I do). While the flaws of a single point source are evident, it is of my belief that (ideally, soundness of the parties reference sources assumed) the worst it can be is incomplete. Opposed to the additional variables introduced via a collective effort with no true standardization being judiciously implemented....(no disparagement intended, simply highlighting the usual course observed in internet forums)

As an aside, due to the ravages of history and human interference the ENTIRE history of ALL U47's might in fact not be available, or unaccountable...missing serial numbers, modifications and so on would further blur the accurateness of any compilation, regardless of methodology. However even these variables can be worked around. These issues (and others) have similarly marked the history of the C12 and 251. Even amongst the well informed (Klaus, Oliver, Andreas, Drefahl and others) there seems to be a lack of a DEFINITIVE consensus in regards to some of the accurate detailing of some the part specific histories... I do recognize that your question holds a somewhat less "micro-managerial" trajectory....and in that context it is possible that your desire can be fulfilled. The love of microphones and the U47 particularly is what spurred my desire for designing and building microphones, so I personally hope that this can be achieved.

Oliver Archut has a near encyclopedic knowledge of all things Neumann, he would also be a wonderful resource as well, I find him to be affable and helpful, however I cannot say to what extent he would be willing to divulge.

If I might join the party in my own way:
Last verified delivery of a U47 to a Neumann distributor (according to Mr.Heyne's records): "...U47 #5626 delivered 01/14/1963 to Telefunken, Stuttgart, Germany..."

also from his records: Telefunken, a part-owner of Neumann, had Neumann U47s badged with the Tele diamond whenever Tele provided Neumann distribution or turn-key studio installations in Germany and Europe, since the beginning of the U47's run, in 1948/49. Telefunken required that pretty much all equipment delivered through the firm was to be badged as 'Telefunken'.

Tele also had the exclusive rights to export to the U.S. (administered by American Elite in New York, for reasons having to do with Berlin's post-war status.)
Those mics of course bore the Tele diamond, until mid-1958 when Gotham/Temmer took over. After that time, all Neumann mics imported into the U.S. had Neumann badges, while Telefunken continued to distribute (and badge) some Neumann mics until its relationship with Neumann ended in the mid-1960s. All through this time, those Neumann mics not sold or distributed through Telefunken had the Neumann badge.


I hope this is a helpful contribution.
Old 4th September 2010
  #5
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d
Quote:
Originally Posted by R-AP.SCI View Post
Salutations!!

Perhaps this will be of some assistance...While there appears to be no complete compendium (on the internet) or codex currently published regarding the finer aspects of the history of the U47 (regarding ALL of its components and identifiers), there is a solution of sorts. But first...

... to answer your questions, yes one could consider it to be a good book as it is currently endorsed by Neumann, and the author, Anselm Rößler, was given access to their more than considerable archives. However this book (appears) to be more geared towards the celebration of Neumann company via a discourse of its history. There is no indication of it containing an archival of the actual microphones (and their various iterations) histories in anything more than a general sense, therefore I presume that some-if not many-of your questions will not be answered by the acquisition of this publication (I have included PDF's of excerpts from this book). There does appear to be other useful information to be gleaned from it though. Yes it is available, in English...316 pages for 58Euros.
Here is a link to its purchase:

PPVMEDIEN Internetshop - _English books

HOWEVER... there is a more than acceptable workaround...(in my opinion).

As many may (or may not) know, Mr.Klaus Heyne will have a book published detailing a very wide body of knowledge (historic and technical) called "The vintage microphone handbook". It supposedly will contain ..."where the whole sequence and identifiers of U47 generations are laid out."

It also may or may not be common knowledge that the publication date for this book has been pushed back more than once (for reasons unknown to me). However there have been no statements from Mr.Heyne on his forum that said book is NOT going to be published. Therefore, in regards to your query....to the best of my knowledge there is none BUT there will be! I might also add that Mr.Heyne has stated on his forum that if one were to email him requesting said history he will..."copy and paste the somewhat lengthy history." This fact should also make said information immediately available, dependent upon his compliance/desire to supply it....however as he does this for "shameless self promotion" of his book I am unsure as to what stipulations he would release the desired information.

In regards to it being available on this forum, this is obviously a matter of disclosure with Mr.Heyne (IF said historic information were to come via his work). In my opinion the publication of his book would be (up till now) the most thorough single point source regarding a complete historic and technical compendium of the U47....That is if one were to believe he and his sources to be reputable (which I do). While the flaws of a single point source are evident, it is of my belief that (ideally, soundness of the parties reference sources assumed) the worst it can be is incomplete. Opposed to the additional variables introduced via a collective effort with no true standardization being judiciously implemented....(no disparagement intended, simply highlighting the usual course observed in internet forums)

As an aside, due to the ravages of history and human interference the ENTIRE history of ALL U47's might in fact not be available, or unaccountable...missing serial numbers, modifications and so on would further blur the accurateness of any compilation, regardless of methodology. However even these variables can be worked around. These issues (and others) have similarly marked the history of the C12 and 251. Even amongst the well informed (Klaus, Oliver, Andreas, Drefahl and others) there seems to be a lack of a DEFINITIVE consensus in regards to some of the accurate detailing of some the part specific histories... I do recognize that your question holds a somewhat less "micro-managerial" trajectory....and in that context it is possible that your desire can be fulfilled. The love of microphones and the U47 particularly is what spurred my desire for designing and building microphones, so I personally hope that this can be achieved.

Oliver Archut has a near encyclopedic knowledge of all things Neumann, he would also be a wonderful resource as well, I find him to be affable and helpful, however I cannot say to what extent he would be willing to divulge.

If I might join the party in my own way:
Last verified delivery of a U47 to a Neumann distributor (according to Mr.Heyne's records): "...U47 #5626 delivered 01/14/1963 to Telefunken, Stuttgart, Germany..."

also from his records: Telefunken, a part-owner of Neumann, had Neumann U47s badged with the Tele diamond whenever Tele provided Neumann distribution or turn-key studio installations in Germany and Europe, since the beginning of the U47's run, in 1948/49. Telefunken required that pretty much all equipment delivered through the firm was to be badged as 'Telefunken'.

Tele also had the exclusive rights to export to the U.S. (administered by American Elite in New York, for reasons having to do with Berlin's post-war status.)
Those mics of course bore the Tele diamond, until mid-1958 when Gotham/Temmer took over. After that time, all Neumann mics imported into the U.S. had Neumann badges, while Telefunken continued to distribute (and badge) some Neumann mics until its relationship with Neumann ended in the mid-1960s. All through this time, those Neumann mics not sold or distributed through Telefunken had the Neumann badge.


I hope this is a helpful contribution.

First and foremost. Thank you for your post. Very informative. However, now that you told me there is no "official" accurate history book. I must say from my personal experience that a book of this topic should be made before its too late and it should be a collaborated mission. I believed it will definitely be a success by its loyalist fans. I have much respect for all of those who know about these classic notorious microphones.. Andreas, Klaus, Oliver, Fletcher, Bill Bradley, Drefahl and others.

Its a blessing to have such informative fellows alive today who can share their thoughts. I believe they all have positive contributions to this subject. But unfortunately, there is some slight conflict. For example. I was told by Andreas Grosser. I person I consider a good friend and he is also a tech that I use on a constant basis for my mic repairs and preamps. That the Mylar Berlin M7 did exist. It was one of the first experimental examples. And he happens to have it in his possession. And that it is so rare, not many know about it. And in the contrary, you have Klaus Heyne who I respect as well, who says Neumann never made such a thing in that time. It doesn't exist, I would love to be proved wrong.

So what do we have? We don't have facts so to speak. But only confusion. Whoever is right. That isn't so important to me in relations of hard facts. I find is surprising that Neumann themselves don't even know or are relunctant to comment. But I hope one day, somebody or everyone (Klaus, Oliver, Andreas, Drefahl and others.) will contribute to a book of knowledge and history of these loved microphones before they past away. I mean to this day, you have dozens of microphone manufacturers still trying to find the secret sauce and copy these legendary microphones. I think the world and all mic connoisseurs would be highly grateful for a fan book so to speak.

Another example. You got one guy saying a VF14 tube without the infamous Neumann approved "M" stamp was a failure tube for Neumann. Neumann didn't accept it. Didn't meet the standards for their U47. Then you got another well know reputable mic tech that says this is a fallacy. That they are plenty of standard VF14s that meet or exceed the "M" stamp specifications according to his tests and his test equipment used. And the "M" stamp story is all BS. Because there were some M tubes that just didn't even work to spec in his experience. Was it a Neumann marketing hype at that time?

These are just a few examples on why I desire the facts and history. I love these microphones. I am collecting them now for my own personal mic locker. And as much as I like to use them. I like to own them and know all about them especially after I spent thousands in dollars for them.. And most importantly they are just so cool! heh

Thanks for the post!
Old 4th September 2010
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DONNX View Post
Another example. You got one guy saying a VF14 tube without the infamous Neumann approved "M" stamp was a failure tube for Neumann. Neumann didn't accept it. Didn't meet the standards for their U47. Then you got another well know reputable mic tech that says this is a fallacy. That they are plenty of standard VF14s that meet or exceed the "M" stamp specifications according to his tests and his test equipment used. And the "M" stamp story is all BS. Because there were some M tubes that just didn't even work to spec in his experience. Was it a Neumann marketing hype at that time?
I have never found a satisfactory answer to this one.

The M stamped VF14 in my U47 was apparently critical until the price went up and the ton of non M stamped V14's appeared...cynical maybe...but now I'm told it was all a myth...I don't know what to believe.
Old 4th September 2010
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Space Station View Post
I have never found a satisfactory answer to this one.

The M stamped VF14 in my U47 was apparently critical until the price went up and the ton of non M stamped V14's appeared...cynical maybe...but now I'm told it was all a myth...I don't know what to believe.

Well I can tell you from my own experience. A standard VF14 works very well in my U47and sounds nice!! I would not hesitate to buy more with no "M" on it. Hell I will even stamp my on "M" on it. Just to make everyone feel more confident. As long as its checked out by a U47 tech to be a good up to spec tube. Its a good tube.

fuuck the "M" heh
Old 4th September 2010
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DONNX View Post
Well I can tell you from my own experience. A standard VF14 works very well in my U47and sounds nice!! I would not hesitate to buy more with no "M" on it. Hell I will even stamp my on "M" on it. Just to make everyone feel more confident. As long as its checked out by a U47 tech to be a good up to spec tube. Its a good tube.

fuuck the "M" heh
Sure, but I'd like to know the truth behind it.
Old 4th September 2010
  #9
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The manufacturing and quality control at the time the Telefunken VF-14 was produced was probably so good that most of the tubes they produced met these standards anyway.
Old 4th September 2010
  #10
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FYI my large badge is #154.
I've been told only 400 or so were ever made but who knows.
Old 4th September 2010
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbjp View Post
FYI my large badge is #154.
I've been told only 400 or so were ever made but who knows.

Cool bro. Nice to know. Hey this is a picture of her brother #155 heh

Nice thumbsup Is your grill satin like this #155 or Chrome finished?
Attached Thumbnails
History of the U47 and other Famous Neumann Telefunken microphones.-u47-21.jpg   History of the U47 and other Famous Neumann Telefunken microphones.-u47-20.jpg  
Old 4th September 2010
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DONNX View Post
Cool bro. Nice to know. Hey this is a picture of her brother #155 heh

Nice thumbsup Is your grill satin like this #155 or Chrome finished?
Chrome. I'm guessing the head grill must have been replaced on mine? Have no idea!
Here's a pic I just took:
Attached Thumbnails
History of the U47 and other Famous Neumann Telefunken microphones.-u47lb.jpg  
Old 5th September 2010
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbjp View Post
Chrome. I'm guessing the head grill must have been replaced on mine? Have no idea!
Here's a pic I just took:

Nice. Its most likely the original head. Andreas told me that these mics sometimes had satin, sometimes chrome in that time. I was wondering because I never seen a big badge with a satin head. #155 is the first.
Old 5th September 2010
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GlenR View Post

That depended on the use of the U47. If the U47 was for a TV station they made the dome (head grill) nickel because the TV station requested that. This way the TV cameras didn't pick up any reflections. Later they decided to put only nickel head grills on the U47s not to have to produce two kinds of domes.



This makes alot of sense.


Quote:
Originally Posted by GlenR View Post
Putting a none M tube into a U47 doesn't make any sense. A selected EF12 is way better and more reliable although slightly different. The EF12 was used in the Siemens SM 20 mic and sounds awesome.

I think it makes sense if you like that EF12 sound. To say one is better than the other is truly subjective. The bottom line is, if you want the true U47 original sound. You need a VF14. I can agree that some mic techs will say/opinionate that EF12 is better, has better specs, but they don't record. I do. And they don't sound the same. Some guys want that traditional VF14 tone. And are willing to pay the ridiculous prices of 1k to 2K in US dollars for one VF14 tube.


Unless you own a Siemens 47 or any other german mic that originally came with an EF12, I wouldn't bother with the EF12 if you own a U47.
Old 5th September 2010
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GlenR View Post
Then you should read the Neumann book. Neumann sended the most VF-14 tubes back to Telefunken because they were noisy. One time they only did get noisy tubes and started to mark the tubes. This way they noticed that Telefunken sended the failed tubes over and over again. That was one of the reasons Neumann stopped building the U47. Putting a none M tube into a U47 doesn't make any sense. A selected EF12 is way better and more reliable although slightly different. The EF12 was used in the Siemens SM 20 mic and sounds awesome.





That depended on the use of the U47. If the U47 was for a TV station they made the dome (head grill) nickel because the TV station requested that. This way the TV cameras didn't pick up any reflections. Later they decided to put only nickel head grills on the U47s not to have to produce two kinds of domes.



I'm not sure of your VF14 story . First VF14 was not made specifically for the U47 but was a military valve . Telefunken stopped making them , hence the versions with the Nuvistor . VF14 were mesured for noise and that's all . If you send your 47 to Andreas Grosser or Peter Drefahl they can measure it too and tell you if it's noisy or not .
Old 5th September 2010
  #16
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Don, as you already have good contact to Andreas, one of his colleagues in Berlin is Riza Coertlen from vox-o-rama. He has gathered very much information and knowledge about Neumann mics of this generation. He might be a very good source!

VOX-O-RAMA – Tontechnik: Klassiker, Raritäten

Best regards

Friedemann
Old 5th September 2010
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DONNX View Post
I have found there is a book made by PPVmedian. Called "Neumann The Microphone Company". I wanted to buy this book. But having a hard time finding it and information about it. If its a good book that has information about the older vintage mics? And can it be still bought today and most importantly, is it in english.
Neumann - the Microphone Company by Anselm Rößler - Powell's Books
Attached Images
History of the U47 and other Famous Neumann Telefunken microphones.-cover.jpg 
Old 5th September 2010
  #18
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I did not always find the Anselm Roessler book authoritative or its historical data reliable despite the author's considerable access to the company's archives (read the chapter on the U67, for example, and you will find several errors.) The problem: the author is a good wordsmith but because he is not a mic expert, he could not, through his own knowledge, filter which of the information he was fed was accurate, and which was at least suspicious (remember: most sources with deep knowledge of the post-war Neumann period are no longer alive.)
Though I must admit, the book's pictures alone are worth the price of admission.

On the VF14, quoting from my book:

"This particular pentode tube was exclusively designed and built by Telefunken for Neumann, though metal jacketed tubes of similar design with octagonal socket tubes had been developed for field radios in the 1930s, and a VF14 derivative was employed for the steering electronics of the infamous V2 flying rocket, towards the end of World War Two. Between 1946 and 1957, exactly 27,548 VF 14 tubes were produced and made exclusively available to be tested by Neumann for their suitability to work quietly and reliably in a high performance microphone. Around 9000 of those that passed Neumann's noise-floor and other performance tests received a white 'M' color stamp on the side of the black-painted tube. The rejects went as surplus into general radio supply sales.
For the most part, 'M' tubes are a bit quieter than non-'M'.
But these days one can be lucky to find any quiet VF14 in new or used condition and should just try it. Chances are it will work reasonably well long-term in a U47/48." © Klaus Heyne

Yes, the book was announced two years ago, and... I am still writing (and Hal Leonard has not thrown the book at me, yet!) The cause for the delay: fact checking. It's really paramount for the credibility of a book on vintage mics.
Old 5th September 2010
  #19
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History of the U47 and other Famous Neumann Telefunken microphones.

Thanks Klaus for correcting us . Looking forward to reading your book .
Old 8th September 2010
  #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Volodia View Post
I'm not sure of your VF14 story .
No, he is right. BTW It's not his story... You can do a research.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Volodia View Post
If you send your 47 to Andreas Grosser or Peter Drefahl they can measure it too and tell you if it's noisy or not .
Sure, but still not to Neumann's former standards. Or let's put it this way. You'll have a hard time to find a none M VF14 with the same noise floor, and "if" you pay a fortune after paying a lot of money for failed tubes.
Old 8th September 2010
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nashville Cat View Post
No, he is right. BTW It's not his story... You can do a research.




Sure, but still not to Neumann's former standards. Or let's put it this way. You'll have a hard time to find a none M VF14 with the same noise floor, and "if" you pay a fortune after paying a lot of money for failed tubes.
Well on Neumann site it's said that Telefunken stopped making VF14 not that Neumann stopped making the 47 because of VF14 QC ,that's the part of the story I'm not sure about . Klaus post is not as affirmative as you regarding non M VF14s .

Doing a research I found that ;
AN ADDED "M" STANDS FOR "SELECTED BY NEUMANN LAB TECHNICIANS FOR USE WITH MICS". A NON-M VERSION CAN MEAN A VARIETY OF THINGS: IT MAY NEVER HAVE BEEN TESTED FOR SELECTION, OR IT HAS BEEN TESTED AND REJECTED, OR HAS BEEN TESTED O.K. BUT NEVER RECEIVED THE MARKING "M".

And from Gunther Wagner : "The VF14 was build by TELEFUNKEN and mainly used in domestic AC/DC radio receivers ("Allstrom Empfaenger") in Germany after World War II. At the time when Georg Neumann decided to use this tube in the new developed U47 from 1949, the market for AC/DC radio receivers had already started to dry up and in the late 50's Telefunken decided to stop production of the entire steel tube family for cost reasons." goes to show that it's Telefunken that stopped the VF14 and not Neumann who stopped because of VF14 qualities .


Quite different story .
Old 8th September 2010
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nashville Cat View Post
No, he is right. BTW It's not his story... You can do a research.




Sure, but still not to Neumann's former standards. Or let's put it this way. You'll have a hard time to find a none M VF14 with the same noise floor, and "if" you pay a fortune after paying a lot of money for failed tubes.

I don't know if this can be declared as 100% true fact. Because you got different stories from very reputable sources. Unless you deal with many of these tubes. An test them for a living. Like Andreas Grosser does. Then you might know the truth here. He told me not to worry about finding a M tube. He has come across many non M VF14 tubes that sounded as good or better than the M stamps. This guy has repaired alot U47s in Germany. He said, if I was to ever buy more, send them to him and he would do a thorough test. Making sure all the specs are met IAW with Neumann.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Klaus View Post
w

Yes, the book was announced two years ago, and... I am still writing (and Hal Leonard has not thrown the book at me, yet!) The cause for the delay: fact checking. It's really paramount for the credibility of a book on vintage mics.
From the looks of getting facts from Neumann's mic history. This may take a long time. Every expert of these mics has their own story. Which confuses the hell out of me as a fan of these gems. I hope it doesn't take forever.. I hope Neumann steps up and contributes some factual info...I don't why I get an impression like they don't care about their classic mics. A factual published book would be nice. I would buy it. But if it isn't factual. I might have to pass.



Thanks Klaus for taking the time to write a book. Looking forward to reading it.
Old 12th June 2011
  #23
mom
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Neumann U47 "large badge" versions - the serials

Quote:
Originally Posted by DONNX View Post
Hello all,

... what were the serial #s of the very first Big Badge U47s? If you own one pleae post your serial # as a reference if you don't mind. For example, serial #155, #186, #361 and #761 are the big badge classics.

...
Hi,

I would like to contribute some of my knowledge concerning the Neumann U47 "large badge", "big badge" or "big logo" versions - as they are often called - to your very interesting thread.

I know at least, that the following 22 (!) Neumann U47 microphones belong to this extraordinary group of milestones:

- Neumann U47 - # 46,
- Neumann U47 - # 50,
- Neumann U47 - # 81 => Neumann U47 N ( unfortunately that's still an RCA 13CW4 nuvistor conversion ),
- Neumann U47 - # 85,
- Neumann U47 - # 95,
- Neumann U47 - #105,
- Neumann U47 - #109,
- Neumann U47 - #139,
- Neumann U47 - #145,
- Neumann U47 - #155,
- Neumann U47 - #163,
- Neumann U47 - #165,
- Neumann U47 - #168,
- Neumann U47 - #173,
- Neumann U47 - #175,
- Neumann U47 - #176,
- Neumann U47 - #177,
- Neumann U47 - #183,
- Neumann U47 - #186,
- Neumann U47 - #214,
- Neumann U47 - #230 as well as
- Neumann U47 - #234.

The Telefunken U47 M - #374 is also a very special version:

It has the well-known Telefunken badge at the front side AND
a chromed Neumann type plate at the rear side =o)

"OMG, what a freak !!!"

Last edited by mom; 12th June 2011 at 11:37 PM.. Reason: just a little spelling mistake =o)
Old 16th June 2011
  #24
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Thanks MOM. What a cool name...heh MOM.


I appreciate this list. I archive and collect those serials as well for when the big badge version were around. I got up serial 500 or so from the top of my head.

Then they went to the smaller badge.

U47p version. I like to emphasize and be clear more so than I posted before. The brass bodied U47p. My thinking was they were before the big badge, which is incorrect according Neumann.

1955 is when the U47P was first introduced. M7 capsule was created in 1932. I didn't realize they went that far back.

It was a pleasure meeting Martin Schneider at Neumann's Berlin HQ. Very nice gentleman and a solid source of good mic knowledge.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mom View Post
Hi,

I would like to contribute some of my knowledge concerning the Neumann U47 "large badge", "big badge" or "big logo" versions - as they are often called - to your very interesting thread.

I know at least, that the following 22 (!) Neumann U47 microphones belong to this extraordinary group of milestones:

- Neumann U47 - # 46,
- Neumann U47 - # 50,
- Neumann U47 - # 81 => Neumann U47 N ( unfortunately that's still an RCA 13CW4 nuvistor conversion ),
- Neumann U47 - # 85,
- Neumann U47 - # 95,
- Neumann U47 - #105,
- Neumann U47 - #109,
- Neumann U47 - #139,
- Neumann U47 - #145,
- Neumann U47 - #155,
- Neumann U47 - #163,
- Neumann U47 - #165,
- Neumann U47 - #168,
- Neumann U47 - #173,
- Neumann U47 - #175,
- Neumann U47 - #176,
- Neumann U47 - #177,
- Neumann U47 - #183,
- Neumann U47 - #186,
- Neumann U47 - #214,
- Neumann U47 - #230 as well as
- Neumann U47 - #234.

The Telefunken U47 M - #374 is also a very special version:

It has the well-known Telefunken badge at the front side AND
a chromed Neumann type plate at the rear side =o)

"OMG, what a freak !!!"
Old 16th June 2011
  #25
Gear Addict
 

Klaus heyne has a book on vintage mics and a forum somewhere on the web. sometimes he's here on gearslutz.

bill bradley and stephe paul audio are also specialists in neumanns.

mixonline had a series on vintage mics. you can find them on their website.
Old 17th June 2011
  #26
mom
Gear Nut
 
mom's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DONNX View Post
Thanks MOM. What a cool name...heh MOM.
Hi,

though I'm definitely the

"mom" ( = "Microphone Online Museum" ),

I'm also a

"dad" ( "deeply addicted dude" ) with respect to vintage microphones from all over the world.

By the way - you are right - I'm rather a dad =o)
Old 25th February 2012
  #27
Lives for gear
 

did any Telefunken vs. Neumann U47's share common serial numbers? i.e., are there Tele serial #1234, and also a Neumann #1234... or was each # completely unique, whether Tele or Neumann?

Also, was each "brand" produced in consecutive set of numbers, or did they get mixed? i.e. Tele serial #100-999, and Neumann serial #1000-5000, etc. Or could you find a Tele #100 and 102, then a Neumann #101 and 103?
Old 25th February 2012
  #28
Lives for gear
 
jmikeperkins's Avatar
For many years I have heard rumors about the VF-14 tube being used in **** era radios and other devices, but I believe Klaus Heyne is right and the VF-14 was only made for the U47 and that is why they are so rare. I have never seen anyone produce an example of another (vintage) device that used a VF14 as original equipment. There are a lot of tubes that LOOK like VF14's with the metal jacket and the same socket but are something else.
Old 25th February 2012
  #29
Lives for gear
 
carloff's Avatar
Quote:
but I believe Klaus Heyne is right and the VF-14 was only made for the U47 and that is why they are so rare.
This is not true.
There was another commercial product using VF14 : the Hewel FM converter..


2 tubes
one VF14 another VCH11

year 1949/1950


between 1946 and 1957, exactly 27,548 VF 14 tubes were produced.



from neumann forum:
The VF14 was originally developed in the mid 1930s as a standard universal pentode for military field radios, where it was employed mainly in RF-front ends, mixers and fixed gain IF-stages, and rarely in AF stages. Much less of this equipment survived than U47/48 microphones though ...
Old 27th February 2012
  #30
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssprod19 View Post
did any Telefunken vs. Neumann U47's share common serial numbers? i.e., are there Tele serial #1234, and also a Neumann #1234... or was each # completely unique, whether Tele or Neumann?

Also, was each "brand" produced in consecutive set of numbers, or did they get mixed? i.e. Tele serial #100-999, and Neumann serial #1000-5000, etc. Or could you find a Tele #100 and 102, then a Neumann #101 and 103?
anyone?
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