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Looking for a top end piano: anybody tried/bought the Roland V Piano?
Old 18th November 2009
  #1
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Looking for a top end piano: anybody tried/bought the Roland V Piano?

Hi all,

I am looking for the "crème de la crème" - sound and action possibly fit for classical players - new tech piano for my studio on a small Greek island where a grand is unfortunately not an option (transport is VERY risky, tuning and maintenance difficult, size is an issue as the studio is large but not huge, etc...). I own and use a Bechstein in the studio I have in another country.
Has anybody tried and bought a Roland V piano? Any other suggestion? (budget is ok in the V piano price range)

Thanks!
Old 18th November 2009
  #2
Here for the gear
 

"Crème de la crème" just isn't possible with synthesis yet. If you want something that classically trained pianist would be happy to play, it's going to have to be an actual piano.

What about a decent upright? Or would maintenance still be an issue?
Old 18th November 2009
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hearingdouble View Post
"Crème de la crème" just isn't possible with synthesis yet. If you want something that classically trained pianist would be happy to play, it's going to have to be an actual piano.

What about a decent upright? Or would maintenance still be an issue?
I know, I am a player and I have ruled out sampled piano solutions.
But yes transport and maintenance are definitely an issue there.
So I am looking for a "least bad"/acceptable instrument if there is such a thing.
Old 18th November 2009
  #4
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Kawai MP8II. Actually a very good piece of gear!
Old 18th November 2009
  #5
Here for the gear
 

Given that you are a player, you could get over the maintenance issue yourself by buying a set of tuning forks and taking some piano tuning classes. An effort, sure, but as a pianist you'll appreciate the difference it allows. Then, you would only have to solve the transport issue... but for an upright, it must at least be possible.

Still, I'm not really helping you with your initial request, so I'll shut up now, except to add that you would probably get away with a Roland or equivalent in the back of a busy mix, but as for solo or classical piano: forget it. In 10 years time, things might be different; but for now, even the best emulations (that I've heard, at least) sound 'flat'.
Old 18th November 2009
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hearingdouble View Post
Given that you are a player, you could get over the maintenance issue yourself by buying a set of tuning forks and taking some piano tuning classes. An effort, sure, but as a pianist you'll appreciate the difference it allows. Then, you would only have to solve the transport issue... but for an upright, it must at least be possible.

Still, I'm not really helping you with your initial request, so I'll shut up now, except to add that you would probably get away with a Roland or equivalent in the back of a busy mix, but as for solo or classical piano: forget it. In 10 years time, things might be different; but for now, even the best emulations (that I've heard, at least) sound 'flat'.
+1

I'm not a snob, but every professional, polished player is - they never accept ANYTHING other than the real thing.

That said, I've not heard the new Roland's, but - IMO, the Nord has some of the most realistic piano sounds, and the action is very good...
Old 18th November 2009
  #7
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EastWest pianos collection
Old 18th November 2009
  #8
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Thank you all for your inputs so far.
What I find interesting/puzzling is that after 68 viewings of this thread in a couple of hours, nobody has yet reacted about the V piano itself, object of the question.

Last edited by Elevteros; 18th November 2009 at 03:19 PM.. Reason: typo
Old 18th November 2009
  #9
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.........tried one a few months ago..........very excited cause of the hype.........but again..........disappointed. My brother who is a pianist was quite excited by the prospect of it, we got the demo and pitch from the sales person......who kept demonstrating all the sonic possibilities you couldn't get from a real piano......."now to get this sound you would need a piano that was 100 feet long".........while I kept saying " I just want to hear something that sounds like a piano to my ears" and off he would go and attempt to dazzle me with some bizarre sound effect that was admitedly impressive. As I say my brother is a great player and he loved the feel of the keyboard.........but from a listening perspective it still sounds digital, so we passed.
Old 18th November 2009
  #10
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Thanks butterfly! But not encouraging, except for the

Quote:
he loved the feel of the keyboard
What is the hype all about! It is after all a rather expensive instrument.
Old 18th November 2009
  #11
Gear Head
 

Elevteros,

I have a V-Piano. While I immediately agree that, sonically, it’s not a wholly satisfying replacement for the real thing, it most certainly is the closest we have available at this moment (and, believe me, I have tried a lot of what’s currently on the market). If you have a really good sound system, and close your eyes while playing the V-Piano, there are more than a few moments when the experience becomes remarkably believable. And the invaluable bonus of not having to deal with all the work, technique and equipment required for recording a real grand piano - which, I’m sure you’ll agree, is a sophisticated craft & art in itself - has to be a serious consideration as well of course. It certainly was for me and it did help in accepting the fairly substantial price of the instrument.

The feel and action - while taking some getting used to after having spent years on lesser equipped keyboards - is really very good (the keys themselves have a very pleasant texture) and the dynamic response is just fabulous. Best I’ve ever had under my fingers anyway. And to put that in perspective: the instrument that’s been replaced by the V-Piano in my studio is the GEM Promega 3, not a mediocre keyboard itself by any standard.

Like most pianoplayers, I’m not really all that interested in the V-Piano’s ‘vanguard’ possibilities (the hyper-real, surreal or unreal presets), I merely want quick and easy access to a really good sounding, musical and believable piano emulation applicable in a broad range of music styles (in my case, mostly hovering between jazz- and ‘modern classical’-related idioms). And the V-Piano certainly delivers that. Generously.

Unfortunately, I’ve already run into two things which I find a rather disappointing: firstly, there’s the keyboard-stand (KS-V8) which, for some inexplicable reason, can’t be adjusted in height. Not that much of a problem, I suppose, if you’re of reasonably normal size, but I happen to be close to 2m tall and my legs just don’t fit comfortably under the instrument. I really need to find a solution for that.

Secondly, and more seriously, the G4-G5 range of the first piano (‘Vintage 1’) does have a few weak sounding notes, I find. (Strange that I haven’t seen this mentioned anywhere before.) Not something that is very noticeable when playing the instrument casually, but as soon as you linger in that particular range for a while (and play a lot of repeated notes), the timbral flaws become more apparent. The notes around C#5 especially are not very convincing. A bit of shame this, and I do hope that the V-Piano’s system software allows for updates which will fix these isolated weaknesses.

Other than that and taking into account my very limited time with the instrument, I have nothing negative to say about the V-Piano whatsoever. Like I said, I didn’t buy it expecting a 100% convincing replacement for a real grand (only a musical idiot would expect such a thing), I simply wanted a convenient, decent sounding piano simulation that would finally help me get rid of the ever increasing boredom and utter dissatisfaction that I always get when playing sampled instruments.
Also worth remembering is the fact that the V-Piano integrates with your DAW without placing any burden whatsoever on your system - quite a liberating sensation (both for you and your computer), if you’re familiar with the feeling of working with, say, the EWQL Pianos or the Vienna Imperial and the strain these type of instruments can cause on your system.

All things considered and in all honesty, I find the V-Piano a very satisfying solution for serious pianoplayers who, for whatever reason, can’t afford or accomodate a real instrument. It can be improved upon, definitely, but it is a damn fine instrument already. If you like the V-Piano's core timbres (which can be perfectly judged from the many online demos) and if you can explain the necessary funds to yourself, you certainly will not regret the purchase.

_
Old 18th November 2009
  #12
Baz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlugHead View Post
+1

I'm not a snob, but every professional, polished player is - they never accept ANYTHING other than the real thing.

That said, I've not heard the new Roland's, but - IMO, the Nord has some of the most realistic piano sounds, and the action is very good...
I don't play, but the producer I work does and we use his Yamaha C7 all the time. When he's working in Japan, he uses a Steinway (sorry, don't know model) and when we were at our vendor's last, he said "you have to hear this thing!" First time I had heard the V Piano and I found it to be incredible, as does he seeing that he heads down there at least twice a month to play it. He will buy one but is waiting for the price to drop.
Old 18th November 2009
  #13
Gear Maniac
 
Elevteros's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by re-peat View Post
Elevteros,

I have a V-Piano. While I immediately agree that, sonically, it’s not a wholly satisfying replacement for the real thing, it most certainly is the closest we have available at this moment (and, believe me, I have tried a lot of what’s currently on the market). If you have a really good sound system, and close your eyes while playing the V-Piano, there are more than a few moments when the experience becomes remarkably believable. And the invaluable bonus of not having to deal with all the work, technique and equipment required for recording a real grand piano - which, I’m sure you’ll agree, is a sophisticated craft & art in itself - has to be a serious consideration as well of course. It certainly was for me and it did help in accepting the fairly substantial price of the instrument.

The feel and action - while taking some getting used to after having spent years on lesser equipped keyboards - is really very good (the keys themselves have a very pleasant texture) and the dynamic response is just fabulous. Best I’ve ever had under my fingers anyway. And to put that in perspective: the instrument that’s been replaced by the V-Piano in my studio is the GEM Promega 3, not a mediocre keyboard itself by any standard.

Like most pianoplayers, I’m not really all that interested in the V-Piano’s ‘vanguard’ possibilities (the hyper-real, surreal or unreal presets), I merely want quick and easy access to a really good sounding, musical and believable piano emulation applicable in a broad range of music styles (in my case, mostly hovering between jazz- and ‘modern classical’-related idioms). And the V-Piano certainly delivers that. Generously.

Unfortunately, I’ve already run into two things which I find a rather disappointing: firstly, there’s the keyboard-stand (KS-V8) which, for some inexplicable reason, can’t be adjusted in height. Not that much of a problem, I suppose, if you’re of reasonably normal size, but I happen to be close to 2m tall and my legs just don’t fit comfortably under the instrument. I really need to find a solution for that.

Secondly, and more seriously, the G4-G5 range of the first piano (‘Vintage 1’) does have a few weak sounding notes, I find. (Strange that I haven’t seen this mentioned anywhere before.) Not something that is very noticeable when playing the instrument casually, but as soon as you linger in that particular range for a while (and play a lot of repeated notes), the timbral flaws become more apparent. The notes around C#5 especially are not very convincing. A bit of shame this, and I do hope that the V-Piano’s system software allows for updates which will fix these isolated weaknesses.

Other than that and taking into account my very limited time with the instrument, I have nothing negative to say about the V-Piano whatsoever. Like I said, I didn’t buy it expecting a 100% convincing replacement for a real grand (only a musical idiot would expect such a thing), I simply wanted a convenient, decent sounding piano simulation that would finally help me get rid of the ever increasing boredom and utter dissatisfaction that I always get when playing sampled instruments.
Also worth remembering is the fact that the V-Piano integrates with your DAW without placing any burden whatsoever on your system - quite a liberating sensation (both for you and your computer), if you’re familiar with the feeling of working with, say, the EWQL Pianos or the Vienna Imperial and the strain these type of instruments can cause on your system.

All things considered and in all honesty, I find the V-Piano a very satisfying solution for serious pianoplayers who, for whatever reason, can’t afford or accomodate a real instrument. It can be improved upon, definitely, but it is a damn fine instrument already. If you like the V-Piano's core timbres (which can be perfectly judged from the many online demos) and if you can explain the necessary funds to yourself, you certainly will not regret the purchase.

_
Thanks a million times for this hands-on review. As a player I perfectly understand what you are talking about. Interesting that you are coming from the Promega 3 as I am too, besides my "real" piano of course. So obviously you rate the V as a worthwhile improvement as far as emulations are concerned. I did think the core timbres in the demos sounded ok so you are reinforcing this impression. I don't expect a subsitute for the real thing (in particular for my beloved Bechstein) but as I am exactly in the situation you describe - not being able to accomodate a grand in the smaller studio on the island - it did seem that for the time beeing it could be the best solution I could find. The V is the only instrument that has tempted me after listening to a lot of demos. I will most certainly go on the necessary long trip to test it but I was hoping from some guidance before undertaking that trip and I am obviously getting some informed advice now.
Thank you sir, I am grateful that you took the time to write these comments.
Old 18th November 2009
  #14
Gear Maniac
 
Elevteros's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Baz View Post
I don't play, but the producer I work does and we use his Yamaha C7 all the time. When he's working in Japan, he uses a Steinway (sorry, don't know model) and when we were at our vendor's last, he said "you have to hear this thing!" First time I had heard the V Piano and I found it to be incredible, as does he seeing that he heads down there at least twice a month to play it. He will buy one but is waiting for the price to drop.
Thank you very much too Baz for your input and comments!
Old 18th November 2009
  #15
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Levi's Avatar
 

Use the V piano to trigger East West Quantum Leap Pianos. Probably as close as you're gonna get for now.
Old 19th November 2009
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Levi View Post
Use the V piano to trigger East West Quantum Leap Pianos. Probably as close as you're gonna get for now.
Please forgive me, Levi, but doesn't that defeat the object and at $6000 make this the most expensive controller in the market?
Old 19th November 2009
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyspiller View Post
Please forgive me, Levi, but doesn't that defeat the object and at $6000 make this the most expensive controller in the market?
I guess it does... I've never put my hands on the V piano, and never checked the price. I just saw that everyone was saying it was the most amazing feel, and personally, I feel that the EWQL Pianos are the most expressive available at this time, so it seemed like a good fit. Personally, I use these sounds with my S90 ES as a controller and am thrilled. Of course, I'm not a ridiculously classically-trained player, but more of a pop rock guy laying down takes in the studio.

If I had $6000, I'd get a real piano!
Old 19th November 2009
  #18
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fastonkeys's Avatar
 

Thanks to the V-Series players who took the time to chime in!!!

As a RD700GX user (very satisfied) that came from the Kawai MP8 (not MPII - which IMHO is big step backwards from the MP8), how would the "V"s amongst you rate the difference in action between the GX and V? I've been meaning to get out and try one for some time now, but time and tide haven't permitted. Plus, I'm a bit concerned about what I'd be giving away in terms of MIDI controller functionality.

Also, one of the things that the GX community has experienced is key surface degradation. Have you experienced this on the V-series? Quite a lengthy thread (100+ comments) on this topic on my blog if you wish to explore further: Roland RD700GX vs. Kawai MP8 | Adrian Sakashita's Music

All the best!
Old 19th November 2009
  #19
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GYang's Avatar
I have 3 top pro piano players in various music arrangement and sessions working here and so far they were mostly unsatisfied with anything offered in the market and we have access to all controllers available.
V Piano offers different expressive sounds, that amazed me, still after longer playing some of professional players were not so convinced that it offers step forward over the best sampled pianos (and there are some very good choices now).
On head to head comparison several (PC based) sampled pianos were chosen as preferred by them, even without any doubt and considerations on price.
I'm extensive user of Roland V-Synth GT that is one of the greatest modern synths, but again it is not replacement for real analogue synths or PC based sampled instruments when real sounds are needed.
As general consensus on sonic quality+feel we use as the best combo overall Kawai MP8II as controller (still, some players might prefer feel of other hammer graded actions, so there is no point in saying that 'X' piano is better than 'Y') + notebook with Quantum Leap piano/DAC what absolutelly superbly compare to Roland V piano (not to mention other pianos) on comparable (actually lesser budget) with future oriented extended versatility of such solution.

Still, V Piano is really well made instrument that deserves attention of potential buyers and for me as non-pro player it is almost unbelievably good.
Old 19th November 2009
  #20
Gear Maniac
 

Have a Kawai MP8, played with a Roland V (I think the piano samples are bad, but the touch is pretty good; up there with the MP8 and RD700GX (where I think the MP8 feels a bit slower than the RD700GX). I think all the piano samples built into all the keyboards aren't very good (especially in cross fading layers.)

However, there are 2 pianos that are pretty far ahead of this group. One is the AvantGrand from Yamaha:
AvantGrand | Yamaha

This one can really fool you. I think mostly because like the other one below, it uses an actual grand piano keyboard/bed. It was very impressive to play on at Winter NAMM when they debuted it. It just really feels like a real piano and the sounds/speaker system built in are really lifelike (plus you can use it as a midi controller, silence it, and I think there was a line out.) It is pretty expensive compared to the above, but the OP seemed fine with having a real piano except upkeep and this is what this would provide.

...and the other is the Boesendorfer CEUSmaster (which is now owned by Yamaha, but this was done before the acquisition.) This is a real "money no object" digital piano. I haven't actually tried this one out since the few made at the moment are on tour with certain artists or in-residence at certain studios. The VSL have made a special library for it with more layers and engineered for the way this piano triggers (which uses the keyboard from the Imperial and the VSL library was sampled from an Imperial at Boesendorfer's Hall) BTW, this isn't the CEUS system which is the equivalent of the Yamaha Disklaviers (midi real pianos) but a completely digital piano that is just the large keybed in a box with triggers. Boesendorfer used to have a dedicated site to it, but I can't find it now.
Old 19th November 2009
  #21
Gear Head
 

Fastonkeys,

I’ve only been playing the V-Piano for a short while, so, obviously, I can’t comment on any possible key surface degradation. (It would be seriously worrying if I already could, now wouldn’t it?)
Your concern about losing controller functionality is entirely justified though. The V-Piano — and this is quite clear — was never designed to be a serious contender in the field of midi controllers: apart from having exceptionnal keyboard action, it lacks just about everything that one would hope to find on a dedicated controller. (As it happens, the Promega3 was not the world’s best endowed midi-controller either, which is why I’ve always had a second, much smaller keyboard hooked up, conveniently placed between my computer keyboard and my monitors: the humble Evolution MK46 which is richly fitted with all sorts of faders, wheels and knobs.)

It’s maybe also good to know that the V-Piano has a rather large (and completely empty) top surface which can easily hold a second keyboard for midi-controlling duties. You could even think of this as ‘expanding the V-Piano with a dedicated midi controller’. Something like, say, the Evolution or even a keyboard the size of M-Audio’s ProKeys 88 would fit perfectly on top of the V-Piano. (I’d definitely use some kind of protective and antislip material in between the two though, in order to keep the topmost keyboard in place and also to prevent damage to the V-Piano’s surface.)

One other thing I neglected to mention earlier and which definitely deserves mentioning is the wonderful triple pedal that’s included with the V-Piano: the extra colours and expressive possibilities it adds when playing the piano (half-sustain, soft and half-soft pedalling) are much more than mere superficialties. It’s quite amazing how a performance can be enriched by musical use of these possibilities. The soft pedal, for instance, gives the V-Piano this really nice, very tender tone, which has none of that uninspiring lowpass-filtered muffled-ness that one usually gets on many other keyboards which claim to have ‘soft pedal’ functionality included. Very nice.

And something else which I really like about the V-Piano’s sound is the fact that it doesn’t occupy an exaggerated or unrealistic stereo field. This has always been one of my biggest problems with the Promega3's sound, and with all too many other digital/sampled pianos as well: a much too wide stereo image that’s also fairly difficult to narrow without damaging the sound. I really don’t like a piano that has its discant noticeably positioned to one side of the stereo field and its low register equally noticeably to the other.

I still haven’t tried the V-Piano’s software editor (haven’t even installed it yet), but I might do so later today. If anything worth mentioning comes up, I’ll report some more.
Old 19th November 2009
  #22
Registered User
Checkout Pianoteq - True modelling of pianos and other keyboard or strings instruments This software is endorsed by some serious classic pianists. I just like it for pop/rock stuff - it's very tweakable.

It's modeling, not samples - and as such I suspect the V-Piano isn't much better (sorry, haven't heard V=Piano, but Roland are a reliable disappointment).

Having said that, I play Pianoteq via my RD100 keyboard ...

I've bought a bunch of expensive sampled pianos, and they suck. There is something fundamentally wrong about layering single note samples, including room ambiance and stereo imaging, to create chords. The effect is nothing like playing a chord of interacting strings in a single space, and captured with two mics. If you played four sampled notes, you effectively have 8 mics and 4 layers of the same space clashing horribly.

Modelling just seems more musical to me, and create your own space with a decent reverb like an M7.

And the CPU & disk load is so light, it's a joy. Win/Win.

This thing even gets piano tuners excited ...
Old 19th November 2009
  #23
Gear Maniac
 
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Thank you all. Food for thoughts here, and obviously some from V users.
Refreshing that it is not turning into a "mine is bigger/better than yours" contest, and I certainly hope it won't.

I remain very interested in the opinions of serious piano players using the V piano and any other decent piano emulation for that matter.

Evidently it is not a matter of ditching the real thing but of finding the least bad solution I guess. I am not looking either for a controller, but for a playable instrument. Sound and action equally matter of course.
I agree that modeling seems the way to go, hence my interest for the V.
Old 19th November 2009
  #24
Lives for gear
Ya.... real piano is the way to go but since you can not sure..

The Roland is the way to go in your situation.

It's an expensive solution though. Will it actually pay for itself with clients when a used Kawai digital will do?
Old 20th November 2009
  #25
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Quote:
...and the other is the Boesendorfer CEUSmaster (which is now owned by Yamaha, but this was done before the acquisition.) This is a real "money no object" digital piano. I haven't actually tried this one out since the few made at the moment are on tour with certain artists or in-residence at certain studios. The VSL have made a special library for it with more layers and engineered for the way this piano triggers (which uses the keyboard from the Imperial and the VSL library was sampled from an Imperial at Boesendorfer's Hall) BTW, this isn't the CEUS system which is the equivalent of the Yamaha Disklaviers (midi real pianos) but a completely digital piano that is just the large keybed in a box with triggers. Boesendorfer used to have a dedicated site to it, but I can't find it now.
Today 06:19 AM
...................Yes this is what we are considering at the moment, I thought the VSL sample really good.........however I wasn't aware that it was designed with a specific controller in mind, strikes me that the demos I watched werr probably triggered from the controller keyboard you are referring to...........plan was to trigger it with an oasys 88 note keyboard, however that may not be as effective, anyway as many posters mention there are some hi quality sample libraries that can compete or better the Roland, the action however is another issue.
Old 20th November 2009
  #26
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I'm also a piano player and I haven't been satisfied with any sample based solutions. Initially Ivory was sort of exciting but in use it just didn't cut it.

These days I've been choosing to record and old cheap upright over any samples.

If you go the digital route, I strongly suggest you try the Art Vista and the Blunther Digital model ones. These 2 sounded the most realistic (website samples) and raw. NI akoustic, pianotech and a few others are just plain horrible IMO.

I haven't tired the Kawai boards, but Yamaha always delivers (to my taste) Roland are generally too soft and cheap in feel. (Not the V-piano though, which sounds great by the way, but way overpriced)

Good luck!
Old 20th November 2009
  #27
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by butterfly View Post
...................Yes this is what we are considering at the moment, I thought the VSL sample really good.........however I wasn't aware that it was designed with a specific controller in mind, strikes me that the demos I watched werr probably triggered from the controller keyboard you are referring to...........plan was to trigger it with an oasys 88 note keyboard, however that may not be as effective, anyway as many posters mention there are some hi quality sample libraries that can compete or better the Roland, the action however is another issue.
The VSL sample distributed/sold now is not the same as the one that goes with the CEUSmaster. They demoed with the public one, but they have since done a special recording using an Imperial that is set up to have a higher resolution that the amount of control (128 steps) you get with MIDI triggers. The CEUSmaster can do thousands in resolution (and quantizes to MIDI resolution if it needs to trigger something external.) I don't believe the samples for that piano will ever be distributed publicly since it is triggered/programmed in a completely different way.
Old 20th November 2009
  #28
Gear Head
 

I agree that there are a number of sampled pianos out there with a better raw sound than the V-Piano. Strike a few isolated notes or chords on the ArtVista, the Imperial, the Galaxy II, the Bluthner, the EWQL’s, the Kawai-EX, some of the Sampletekk pianos or even the Garritan Steinway, and there’s no denying that this will sound more ‘like a piano’ than what the V-Piano is capable of producing.
However, that’s not telling the whole story, I feel. Not even the first chapter. You see, the problem with all these sampled instruments is that, even though their individual samples can be very convincing, as instruments, these things simply don’t respond the way a player expects a piano to respond. They are not instruments you can ‘interact’ with’. This is probably a negligable consideration to people who aren’t interested in the ‘playing an instrument’-experience and merely want to hear a believable pianosound coming out of their computer (no matter how it is being triggered), but it is tremendously important to anyone who’s addicted to the joy of playing an instrument. It’s this sensation of being absorbed by the piano, while playing it, which I never experience when working with sampled pianos but which, seated at the V-Piano, quickly becomes a wholly satisfying and inspiring physical (and musical) reality. But again: I fully understand that many people wouldn’t care for this argument. I do though.

A second problem I’m having with sampled pianos is that there is always this feeling of lifelessness in the timbre which appears sooner or later. And often: much too soon. Now, I can cope with this for quite some time (been doing just that for several years), but eventually there comes a moment when the whole thing just becomes unbearably tiresome to listen to. Or, put differently: there is not a sampled piano out there which I can play for, say, more than half an hour without starting to get really bored.

But having said that, I can understand perfectly that the V-Piano is not everyone’s idea of what a (high-end) simulated grand piano should be and I'm the last person to recommend it as a universal 'satisfaction guaranteed'-solution to every possible interested person. The physical side of it (the touch, the action, the feel) is really exceptionnaly good - I believe most people will agree on that - but sonically, yes, there are indeed still quite a few things that can be improved.
The funny thing with the V-Piano, I find, is that it tends to sound better when being offered fairly dense and intricate parts (quite the opposite in fact of how sampled pianos tend to respond). The V-Piano is not really a satisfying choice for playing simple, naked lines, in my opinion. Satie’s “Gymnopédies”, for instance, sound rather disappointing on this piano (often revealing some of the artificial origins of its sound), something like Stravinsky’s “Petrushka” on the other hand sounds bloody fantastic and totally believable.

_
Old 22nd November 2009
  #29
Gear Addict
 
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I was looking forward to hearing the V Piano, but found it underwhelming. And considering you can get a great sounding grand piano for around 10k, I really don't see the point. Ok, so maybe a 6' Yamaha or older Steinway doesn't sound like a 9' Bosendofer, but neither does a Sample or V Piano.
Old 22nd November 2009
  #30
Gear Maniac
 
Elevteros's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by philosi View Post
...I really don't see the point...
Just read my first posting.
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