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Old 13th November 2009
  #31
I think one thing nobody has really touched on is the fact that you need to find clients that make money off their music. Setting up a business plan based off clientele that will never make back their investment in your services is a very fast way to bankruptcy. As a sound engineer and a studio owner you/we are a service provider. We are a support system in a way, to help someone else make a marketable product.

Let's use a parallel. Maybe construction. A carpenter/contractor doesn't "design" the house/building, an architect does. The carpenter just builds it. Very similar to songs/production. An artist writes the song, a studio/sound engineer/producer builds the master of that song based off the artist's orginal sketch/blueprint/etc.

Now... as a contractor, building homes... how could you stay in business if you are only targeting developers/architects that can never sell any of the homes they design? How can you expect them to pay you when they themselves can't make any money off their wacky/crazy/LSD induced home designs?

just because someone is a musician and writes songs, does not make them a professional songwriter. Targeting all local bands to come in and record at your studio is like trying to find any and every person that can sketch a house, and asking them to hire you to build that house they sketched on a napkin in a bar while they were drunk.

There is a supply and demand issue too. Too many people think recording is simply sticking up a mic and hitting record. So now there are more "studios" now than there are professionals with the ability to rent them. And as someone else mentioned, most professional studios are not worthy of even being called "studios" anyway, which end up leaving a bad taste for some professionals that have the ability to rent studios.

Over time... this is ultimately what will separate the successes from the failures, in studio ventures. Having a good sounding space, with enough equipment to handle the needs of your clients, and the ability to help your clients create what they hear in their head... and having clients that are able to sell the product they create in your studio.

Let me ask all the people at home that record on there own... Whether you make $50 per year off your music or $500,000... After doing this for a while and knowing how much music you will sell each year off the recordings you do at home... if you ended up recording one of your projects at a studio... and that one project you recorded there sold double or triple what each of your other products have sold. Would you go back to recording at home?
Old 13th November 2009
  #32
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ARIEL's Avatar
I keep hearing of people talk about the new recordings sounding bad ?? well i guess all the cd's i still buy sound great and have been mastered well . Things have changed the massive studios are losing biz , as many producer are converting their homes into studios which saves on overhead . It also boils down to the producer/engineer fellow the reputstion you have and your skill . Alos i believe if you can do it all , mix, master , produce , engineer and even help with all aspects of songwriting you become far more likely to get clients . Of course your final product is the test of that . Also how you treat your customer and your work ethic - word spreads bigtime , they in return tell all their friends bands of the experience . So if your in this camp a one man stop your doing the right biz model .

For me having a house in a great central area smack in the middle of many cities/municipalites is very helpful as well as being able to track drums here and crank up the amps at 3 am without the neighbors hearing. I do know some bigger producers whom have smaller warehouse studios that are always booked as well as their rates are also resonable , they have the skill and quality to back up what they do .

I think all sides of the music biz needs to be changed from the bloated 10 man oepration down to a more lean one . Or else you wont survive .Many bands try to record it themselves and it sounds like a demo , they figure it out after while and most likely book in a proper studio .
Old 13th November 2009
  #33
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alvagoldbook's Avatar
 

I'm one of those musicians as well. I'm 31 now and been recording myself since I was 12 years old on whatever I had on hand. The reason why I got interested in this was that I had more than one horrible experience in a professional recording studio, and that's not including the price tag. It's for this reason that I've decided to embark on making a decent home recording studio, not just for my own tunes, but for young bands who are often short on funds.
Old 13th November 2009
  #34
Gear Head
 

Quote:
"Let me ask all the people at home that record on there own... Whether you make $50 per year off your music or $500,000... After doing this for a while and knowing how much music you will sell each year off the recordings you do at home... if you ended up recording one of your projects at a studio... and that one project you recorded there sold double or triple what each of your other products have sold. Would you go back to recording at home?"
I'm one of those folks who have decided to take the plunge and try some home recording. However, I'm not so naive as to think all that's required is to go out and buy a couple of items of gear and you're on your way, etc. It'll be a while before I'm recording anything that will be considered (by me) to be keeper material.

To answer your question (above): For me a studio has to meet three criteria: it has to produce better quality recordings than I can; it has to treat me like a paying customer and show me the same level of respect I'm expected to show the studio personnel; it must not only be about the money. The reasons I would want to go back to a studio would be because of the increase in quality I'd realize from time spent in the studio, in conjunction with how I was treated by that studio's personnel, and not on the basis of getting cheap rates.

However, if I have a decent room, and some good quality gear, and I know how to use the gear, and my ears are working for me instead of against me, then I believe there's something to be said for having a small home studio; especially for a solo guitar player such as myself who doesn't 'need' a huge mixing console and all the outboard gear that goes with one.

Although I'm another of many who has started getting into this home recording thing I don't believe I'm one of your statistics that is causing the decline of the recording business simply because I choose to record at home and not in a studio. Mostly because I play music for a hobby only (though I do strive for high quality) and I have no desire to make a living from it so I wouldn't be spending all that much time in a studio compared to a musician who intended to make a living from the music.

But...I do appreciate high quality (well-made) music and I understand that a serious music studio can do a better job than I will do at the moment. And with that in mind I intend to do what's necessary to improve to a point where I can create high quality recordings in my home, but I'm in no hurry so am content to have it take as long as it takes for me to learn what I need to know to create quality recordings, etc.

I've had only two studio experiences. One good, one bad. That's a 50% success rate, or a 50% failure rate depending on how you look at it. It needs to be better than that.

One impression I got right away is that I was paying money for an awful lot of equipment I wasn't using.

Another impression was, after one studio reminded me several times why I should be "grateful to be able to record here"...why would I ever want to go back to a place where I'm made to feel 'fortunate' to be in their studio?

The bad experience soured me and is part of the reason for my decision to try the home studio route.

Recording at home is more of a hassle than a convenience but there is something to be said for not having to pay money for studio time only to find you are not on form on a particular day so you just wasted a morning, etc. The convenience of a home studio is not something to be dismissed quickly.

These large studios that are struggling aren't going under because folks like me are recording at home. By their very size they are set up to record a minority of music acts. I can't imagine there are too many musical acts that can afford the rates some of these large studios command.

Another issue is the lack of professionalism in some cases. Except in the ads, where professionalism is touted to be in full swing, it appears that the level of professionalism is not where it needs to be in some cases. Even on some of the forums I don't get much of a sense of consistency when it comes to professionalism. And it wasn't very professional (in my opinion) for a studio owner to keep reminding me 'how lucky I am to be in his studio'! Why would I want to spend my hard-earned dollars in a studio that can't even treat me like a paying customer? If the studio won't take me seriously and treat me like a paying customer why I shoud I take them seriously and go back for more?

I have a comment and a question with respect to these large, fully-equipped studios:
It seems (to me) as though the only folks who are going to be able to fully realize and appreciate the very high standard of musical quality that comes out of these mega-studios, are people who are able to afford the very high-end sound systems required to reproduce the same level of sound quality that the studio has created; those people are in the minority. Average folk don't possess such high-end sound systems to listen to their music.

Maybe some of these large studios have over-equipped themselves to the point where they have made themselves too expensive to do business with.

Wouldn't it make more sense to have a studio that had two or three small rooms with a modicum of equipment available, instead of a huge room full of every piece of equipment under the sun - that few people can afford? A smaller room surely must be more affordable for most people. I'd consider using a studio more often if it had a smaller, more affordable, room that could more easily accomodate me - and as long as there was a level of professionalism that matched the quality of the studio and it's equipment, etc.

I don't shop for low prices (never have) so a studio wouldn't attract my business simply by lowering its prices.

Stu

P.s. I'm no musical expert by any means but I can't help getting the sense that the reason more folks are putting up with less quality in their music is because a lot of the music (that's played on the airwaves anyway) is not up to a very high standard; at least not compared to some of the music that has come before it. Once the folks are conditioned to a lower level of music quality why would they want to pay for quality music recording services? I think what needs to happen first is that the overall quality of the music currently being played over the airwaves needs to increase - and the folks have to want that. I'm not seeing it.
Old 13th November 2009
  #35
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
For those who have taken the challenge to record at home, I think that's fine. But without experienced help at the helm, there's greater chance that you will flounder and turn out product that is "less than stellar". Take a listen anywhere. There are thousands, no, tens of thousands of records coming out each year that have no business even being released. It takes a lifetime of experience to produce consistently great records. Without an experienced producer/arranger and/or engineer to help direct your baby, your chances are around those you'd get in vegas. I fix/mix lots of projects. And we go back, and over, and back and over stuff that would have been finished long ago with experienced talent directing the project.

Just sayin'.....
Old 13th November 2009
  #36
Moderator
 
toolskid's Avatar
 

Space and vibe is what's sellable now - the studios that are doing best at the moment have plenty of one or the other (or both!) or a long standing relationship with a very busy producer/mixer.

Bedrooms tend to have very little of all the above! However, I've seen bedrooms with more serious gear than many London control rooms!!! A console is REALLY not a draw nowadays. Theres also a wealth of private studios in operation now, some of which are just utterly awesome (multiple live rooms, TONS of gear EMI, neve, api boards...) There's often no upfront charge for the client often as they are part of a production deal!!

More and more larger studios are dabbling in education...

People also forget that production is very little about technically recording etc. and ALL about delivering a project in the best possible state. THAT's whats missing from most bedroom projects...not studio time...but experience of actually MAKING records...
Old 13th November 2009
  #37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuartd View Post
Another impression was, after one studio reminded me several times why I should be "grateful to be able to record here"...why would I ever want to go back to a place where I'm made to feel 'fortunate' to be in their studio?
Whoa! If the studio didn't make you *feel* that, they have no business telling you. What ever happened to "show, don't tell"?
Old 13th November 2009
  #38
Gear Head
 

Quote:
"Whoa! If the studio didn't make you *feel* that, they have no business telling you. What ever happened to "show, don't tell"?"
I'm sure not all studios operate in this manner (it wasn't my intention to indicate that 50% of studios operate like this). My other studio visit was completely positive and the guy running it was as professional as his studio. He didn't have to say anything to me. I got the message. A bad experience, on the other hand, often goes a long way to convincing you to stay away, etc.

Quote:
"For those who have taken the challenge to record at home, I think that's fine. But without experienced help at the helm, there's greater chance that you will flounder and turn out product that is "less than stellar"."
Having dabbled only slightly (so far) into home recording I have no doubt you are correct. In my case I'm recording solo guitar with some vocals here and there. I'm not trying to produce a full-blown session with multiple instruments and backing vocals, etc. Maybe I will not do well at home recording but I'm going to put forth the effort at least; and as I said ealier I'm not expecting results overnight. I'm purchasing high-end equipment so at least it should retain its value if I decide that home recording isn't cutting it and I decide to sell the equipment, etc.

If nothing else I hope, at least, to be able to record something that is decent enough where I could take it to a studio that can then bring it up to that extra level of professionalism. Recording one guitar shouldn't be too difficult (I hope).

Stu
Old 13th November 2009
  #39
Gear Addict
 
svart's Avatar
 

Nothing can help the studio business.

1. People are cheap.

2. People LOVE to have their egos stroked. Companies selling products LOVE to do the stroking. Tell someone that they can have studio quality from a tiny little box for 1/4th the price and they'll buy it.

3. When people spend money on something they think will make them do something better than they are capable of, I.E. sound as good as a studio recording, then they will be mentally incapable of hearing the difference.

4. Pride overrides any real and true criticism.


I've heard plenty of home brewed studio work and while I've heard a gem or two, most sound pretty bad yet the musicians think they are best thing ever. No amount of suggestion, helping, encouraging, etc will get them further. They genuinely think they are good enough.

Beat that mentality and you'll save the studio business.
Old 13th November 2009
  #40
For a business to suck-ceed it needs to provide a product people are willing to pay for.

Music is value-less and free now.

That's about it.

Jim Williams
Audio Upgrades
Old 13th November 2009
  #41
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DontLetMeDrown's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tristan Hackney View Post

The sonic differences are obvious, a recording studio is the way forward... If you look at a band of 5 members, thats only Β£100 per person to fully record and mix a track at a professional studio... and the bigger the band, the less its costs each person.
Yep, that might buy them ONE DAY. The bigger the band, the harder the engineer has to work so of course that will take more time. Most of us know that a one day rush job will not be very satisfying unless the band is absolutely incredible to begin with. If that's the case, they will record well no matter what the circumstances may be.

Let me tell you a little about sonic differences... 99.9% of people do not even think about it. I've recorded out of an apartment for the past 5 years. I may not be the best, but I sure as hell try to do the best I can with what I've got. I'm a LOT more inexpensive than "the best of the best" and I will give my clients whatever the hell they ask for (within reason). My tiny place has better gear and vibe than some commercial studios I've visited.

Some would say that the real problem is people like me undercutting the rest of the pack. However, I believe the REAL problem is the old-school studio dinosaurs that are stuck in their ways: treating clients like they are a waste of time and treating their music the same way. I started my own place because I was sick of dealing with condescending engineers that treated me like I was a waste of time. Do you think I will feel bad the day I hear about those studios closing? I'm sure we've all encountered a few peole who DESERVE to go out of business.

My next step is to buy a home and construct a nice project studio within. I believe that private studios are the future of our industry. Personally, there's no way I will be able to afford a mortgage AND a commercial facility anytime soon.
Old 13th November 2009
  #42
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memphisindie's Avatar
 

To answer your original question, no videos, no free access, no.
Musicians, bands, and songwriters need to practice their song writing and playing. They should be getting help with that part before recording for commercial reasons. They should record rehearsals to hear what they sound like and to help focus rehearsals and preproduction, then hey should go to a studio and record"when they're actually ready" vs when they think they are.
The odds they'll make something worth listening to or buying will increase.
Old 13th November 2009
  #43
Back in the early 70's I did some work for Leon Russell (Mad Dogs and Englishmen and others). He had a nice large ranch home in Encino, not far from the Jackson's place.

He was the first I can remember building the studio in the house. It was full featured as any commercial studio. I noticed the vibe was very loose and everyone seemed to have a great time. No clock watching and that allowed the relaxed atmosphere.

From that day I was convinced a great home set up could compete against any commercial set up. That day I lost my awe and respect for commercial rooms. I don't like the locations, the vibe and the costs. We used to complain about the sterile vibe those places had. They still do.

I saw the writing on the wall in 1973. It just took everyone else another 30+ years to figure it out for themselves.

Jim Williams
Audio Upgrades
Old 13th November 2009
  #44
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memphisindie's Avatar
 

I think it works for some and not for others. If somebody is going to be laid back all the time even when in a commercial facility and use a lot of time, then they might want to consider it isn't for them. If somebody is conscious of time already an likes the pressure of a schedule, then a commercial place is for them.
Once again, it depends.
Old 13th November 2009
  #45
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams View Post
Back in the early 70's I did some work for Leon Russell (Mad Dogs and Englishmen and others). He had a nice large ranch home in Encino, not far from the Jackson's place.

He was the first I can remember building the studio in the house. It was full featured as any commercial studio. I noticed the vibe was very loose and everyone seemed to have a great time. No clock watching and that allowed the relaxed atmosphere.

From that day I was convinced a great home set up could compete against any commercial set up. That day I lost my awe and respect for commercial rooms. I don't like the locations, the vibe and the costs. We used to complain about the sterile vibe those places had. They still do.

I saw the writing on the wall in 1973. It just took everyone else another 30+ years to figure it out for themselves.

Jim Williams
Audio Upgrades
In all fairness Jim, that WAS a commercial studio - just located in a house. It then moved to the Toluca Lake area where Hank ended up owning it. It had the West Coast's largest API in it, and eventually became O'Henry's when Hank moved it out of the house due to the LA studio wars when commercial "home" studios were getting shut down left and right. I still have some 550A's out of that console. heh
Old 13th November 2009
  #46
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nukmusic's Avatar
 

sorry..just chiming in on a little break. Couldnt read all the posts.

but has anyone touched on the actual commercial studio staff? That's a big factor in a lot of cases. I've heard so many horrible stories about unsigned/inde/major clients not enjoying their time at certain studios because the engineer or whoever kills/killed the vibe. I've also heard of and experienced(myself) some unprofessional "1st day" drama. Go out to do a tour of a studio you're thinking of using and that initial vibe is just not right. It might be the staff, the general look of the studio, or the gear(selection, condition, etc). Sometimes its the price.

Just recently I spoke with a gtr/bass player that was booking a studio to record the tunes. said he was spending a lot of money and wasn't getting the service he thought he would get.... being that the studio has worked with a lot of major label clients. He said the finally straw was when one of the engineers(with no music background) was trying to school him on how his instrument and music should be tuned and how it should sound. He said he was trying his best to be open-minded but the engineer was way off base. He never went back.

I know in many cases the Studio/Client relationship can be a double edge sword, but at the end of the day most should try to please the clients if they want to keep business coming. In this day and age they are so many options available. I do try to promote that musicians should network with larger studios whenever possible.

on that note....Anyone see any public pay phones around. Times change, People Change You can do a whole lot in smaller studios and end up with good quality.
Old 13th November 2009
  #47
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by nukmusic View Post
sorry..just chiming in on a little break. Couldnt read all the posts.

but has anyone touched on the actual commercial studio staff? That's a big factor in a lot of cases. I've heard so many horrible stories about unsigned/inde/major clients not enjoying their time at certain studios because the engineer or whoever kills/killed the vibe. I've also heard of and experienced(myself) some unprofessional "1st day" drama. Go out to do a tour of a studio you're thinking of using and that initial vibe is just not right. It might be the staff, the general look of the studio, or the gear(selection, condition, etc). Sometimes its the price.

Just recently I spoke with a gtr/bass player that was booking a studio to record the tunes. said he was spending a lot of money and wasn't getting the service he thought he would get.... being that the studio has worked with a lot of major label clients. He said the finally straw was when one of the engineers(with no music background) was trying to school him on how his instrument and music should be tuned and how it should sound. He said he was trying his best to be open-minded but the engineer was way off base. He never went back.

I know in many cases the Studio/Client relationship can be a double edge sword, but at the end of the day most should try to please the clients if they want to keep business coming. In this day and age they are so many options available. I do try to promote that musicians should network with larger studios whenever possible.

on that note....Anyone see any public pay phones around. Times change, People Change You can do a whole lot in smaller studios and end up with good quality.
Regarding the engineeriing staff - who has engineers on staff anymore? Maybe in outside smaller markets. In LA, you secure your own engineer and go in. At least in any of the major type studios we're talkiing about. I'm sure it's diffferent in other areas, but there are self-absorbed know it all's in every business - ESPECIALLY when it comes to musicians - and engineers take the brunt of them everyday for long hours. It's no wonder they get cranky and cynical. But that's no excuse. Much like mechanics, plumbers and churches, sample and try until you find one you like. They are out there. Having a bad experience with a plumber or church won't make me swear off plumbing or God. There's good and bad everywhere. If your guitarist friend didn't dig it, he should be out the door asap. Find someone/somewhere that will accomodate his needs. It's a buyers market.
Old 13th November 2009
  #48
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nukmusic's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
Regarding the engineeriing staff - who has engineers on staff anymore? Maybe in outside smaller markets. In LA, you secure your own engineer and go in. At least in any of the major type studios we're talkiing about. I'm sure it's diffferent in other areas, but there are self-absorbed know it all's in every business - ESPECIALLY when it comes to musicians - and engineers take the brunt of them everyday for long hours. It's no wonder they get cranky and cynical. But that's no excuse. Much like mechanics, plumbers and churches, sample and try until you find one you like. They are out there. Having a bad experience with a plumber or church won't make me swear off plumbing or God. There's good and bad everywhere. If your guitarist friend didn't dig it, he should be out the door asap. Find someone/somewhere that will accomodate his needs. It's a buyers market.
Kinda my point actually when I said "double edge sword".

and yeah..He did find another studio to work at, but it was a smaller, less expensive spot that he is happy with. But he is just one example out of many that have done the same. All and all, the client is not there to please the studio/staff, its the other way around no matter how big or small the client. Its nice when they enjoy each other, but it is what it is.

just food for thought.
Old 13th November 2009
  #49
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by nukmusic View Post
All and all, the client is not there to please the studio/staff, its the other way around no matter how big or small the client.
Agreed 110%.
Old 14th November 2009
  #50
Lives for gear
I'm looking at your website and I'm thinking if you are making a full record for 500 pounds, maybe your too cheap?

No offense or anything but did you work up to that level of studio? A high end neve/vintage etc studio isn't IMHO the kind of thing that you just open one day and expect business. People mostly go to the owner operator studio because of the owner, IME.

I'm not knocking you at all, but where can a potential client hear examples of your work on your website, or even get an idea of what a project would cost or who they would be working with and what their experience is?
Old 14th November 2009
  #51
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nukmusic View Post
on that note....Anyone see any public pay phones around. Times change, People Change You can do a whole lot in smaller studios and end up with good quality.
Oh, pay phones are making a comeback! People are sick of the impersonal text messages and questionable wireless sound quality of cell phones. They want something substantial to hold in their hand and the Experience of making a real analog phone call from a real phone booth, just like the great callers of yesteryear.

Not to mention the protection such booths provide from enraged flocks of crows.

If we can educate the public about the superiority of land-line sound and make it once again 'cool' to make calls from a cozy private booth, we can reverse the trend of the last few years and start raking in those quarters again.

Here is my friend making a call from a genuine working phone booth in Woodstock NY. Actually, she was just pretending to make a call because they wanted $2.50 (for the first minute) to call her friends back in Massachusetts
Attached Thumbnails
More work for Recording Studios....-phone-booth.jpg  
Old 14th November 2009
  #52
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memphisindie's Avatar
 

Nice!
Old 14th November 2009
  #53
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jindrich's Avatar
 

The problem with studios nowadays is very simple: there are no clients anymore.

Major labels have these days 10 artists selling 1million while the rest of their acts dont reach more than 100k copies (and there're 10 times less of those than 10-20 years ago). After that, theres nothing but DIY bands selling 1,000 records (at gigs).


Therefore and leaving aside Coldplay and Madonna, Studios have now just a very small handful of pro clients (bands with 100k sales and weakened budgets), and DIY bands that sell 1k CDs. On the other hand, instead of booking time for the entire project, they all now book the studios for just one week and do the rest of the production at home (or at the producer's home).

And because there are so very few clients, studios undercut their rates one another. Only very few can survive on those conditions.
Old 14th November 2009
  #54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tristan Hackney View Post
i'm aware of way too many bands (good bands) recording in the cheapest way possible outside of professional recording studios. The sonic differences are obvious, a recording studio is the way forward. But how do we go about re-enforcing this?

If you look at a band of 5 members, thats only Β£100 per person to fully record and mix a track at a professional studio. Considering how quickly most people can get through Β£100, its really not much... and the bigger the band, the less its costs each person.
OK I will bite..

What can you get done in a day?

Will the high end studio staff run around in a hurry, aware that the self financed act needs to work really quickly? Not always.. Also, frequently self financed projects hit endless 'money pit' issues

I think there is a standoff between what self financed musicians will pay and how low studios will drop rates. Both parties will hit an "I cant do that" level..

And do they always meet in the middle?

Often not.

Wasn't the High End studio model based on the 'funny money' large record co budgets where they paid at least Β£200 / $400 per day more than self finance projects would pay..? (The answer is yes IMHO) Now a lot of major label work has dropped away is it such a shock that self financed projects struggle to fill these empty shoes?

Its a tricky one..

Re musicians and their finances at least for the UK here is my 4 decade "willingness to pay" guide for musicians..

70's - 80's - not working - getting social security money - band manager or major label pays for sessions - no real spare money at all.
90's - present - Working 5 days a week - monday is snooker night, Thursday is movie night, saturday I go out with my girlfriend - and I go to the pub a few nights a week. I rehearse one night a week with the band. I also buy video games. I only have this small amount of money I am willing to spend on my bands recording.

The 90's - 2000 mindset doesn't seem very 'dedicated' from the recording studio point of view (at least loafing around all day in the 70's & 80's a musician was always free to practice their chops / song write etc..) but what can you do? The band managers that would finance recordings in the 70's and 80's have evaporated. You cant stand in a bands face and shout at them "Look I know you work hard 5 days a week in a job you hate, but cancel all that other fun stuff you pay for for 3 months and give all that money to my studio so we can record you!"

I know where you are coming from and although I didn't shout at them, I did try to 'shake down' bands to raise every single penny they could to spend on a recording with me...(to make a great recording....)

Er....

Try shouting at them?
Old 14th November 2009
  #55
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jindrich's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jules View Post
The band managers that would finance recordings in the 70's and 80's have evaporated. You cant stand in a bands face and shout at them "Look I know you work hard 5 days a week in a job you hate, but cancel all that other fun stuff you pay for for 3 months and give all that money to my studio so we can record you!"
This I've discussed with many (pro) studio owners. There aren't many professional bands (meaning fully commited, with no other job) these days. It's mostly people with full daytime jobs who are in a band and rehearse/play gigs in their spare time. You can't tell them to put aside their jobs for a month or two to record an album. In fact, they don't want to give away even 15 days of their holidays for the task.

So what do you expect the studio can be filled the entire month with? Are owner-engineer-driven studios ready to work only at noon and on the weekends to pay the bills?
Old 14th November 2009
  #56
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memphisindie's Avatar
 

Pick on rich kids with parents that either have big money jobs and can't afford to pay attention to their kids or they inherited money. Then you can get a decent budget, but, talent? Ha hahahahahaha.
Right. Sometimes but rarely.
Then there's religious bands, nonsecular work.
Stuff you wouldn't be ashamed to play or work on. I do that, I do orchestral stuff now, I'm recording one next month for a movie, then comes kids from your house of worship, if you have one, get a scene going with some fanzines, paper ones available at places people hang, yeah, it's like starting from ground zero again but that's what's happening.
It's a fresh new start.
If you knew then what you know now.......
Old 14th November 2009
  #57
Lives for gear
 
memphisindie's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
So what do you expect the studio can be filled the entire month with? Are owner-engineer-driven studios ready to work only at noon and on the weekends to pay the bills?
My answer is YES, Yes I will. That's the time I do work these days.
Old 14th November 2009
  #58
Lives for gear
 
bdmctear's Avatar
 

check out Weathervane...

Tristan,

I am personally involved in a new nonprofit organization called Weathervane Music. Our purpose is to support and advance the work of great independent musicians, particularly artists who are not financially appealing to the for-profit industry. We do so by producing audio and video for artists in a series called the Weathervane Music Project Series. In 2009 we produced songs and video for four artists. The audio recordings are fairly straight forward: the artist comes in to the studio for 2 days. we record on day one, mix day two. For video we produce two 5 to 10 minute videos. One is an artist profile, focusing on the artist's motivation and vision for their music. The other is a technical profile, focusing on the production techniques and ideas that went into the session.

On the surface this is a new way to present music to the public. But on a deeper level, and certainly as a part of our long term goal, we are providing high end, professional recording experiences for artists that likely don't have that opportunity, while educating the public about the importance of an artist's vision. Additionally, we're educating musicans and the public about the beautiful art of recording.

You'll see me all over the videos this year as both a producer and engineer, though in 2010 the intention is to feature other engineers and producers from all different areas and levels of the profession.

I hope you'll all check it out. I'd love feedback from Gearslutz, particularly how we can make it a better and better program.
Old 14th November 2009
  #59
Lives for gear
 
memphisindie's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams View Post
For a business to suck-ceed it needs to provide a product people are willing to pay for.

Music is value-less and free now.

That's about it.

Jim Williams
Audio Upgrades
I think this could be focused more:
Music, the way it is discovered, produced, marketed, and the overall plan has made it valueless and free.
People do not buy things they get for free.

It's basic.
The fact that anyone could make a plan to make money by making what they will sell free first is unfathomably stupid "on it's face", but, that doesn't mean it will always be that way.
Old 14th November 2009
  #60
Gear Maniac
 

Is this thread about art and talent or about making money for a living?
Art and talent has starved religiously throughout history.
Making a living follows the trends.
Neither is a guaranteed roadmap to success but following the trends more than likely has a better chance of paying the rent than following an artistic muse.
Seldom does it seem both worlds collide and leave a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.....and if they do what is your percentage?
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