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Producing RnB [message for ThrillFactor, e-cue, and other RnB headz]
Old 10th July 2005
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Producing RnB [message for ThrillFactor, e-cue, and other RnB headz]

First off, I'd like to thank all those who contribute to these threads. I've been lurking around here for the past 4-5 months now, and owe a lot to this forum for educating me on Pro Audio gear.

I'm a RnB producer/singer who finally got out of school and can afford some gear now that I have a job. I need some recommendations. I'm going to be doing all of the producing at home and getting my vocals recorded and the project mixed down at a pro studio. So my "studio" is really only going to need top notch front end gear.

I currently have a PC based setup, and track in Cubase SX 3. I make extensive use of my MPC 2000XL, my Yamaha Motif keyboard, as well as an assortment of soft synths. I also would like to track some classical guitar once in a while, but I figure I could do that part at the Pro Studio.

Here's what I'm thinking :

1) A Lynx L22 2 channel A/D/A converter for tracking
2) An API 312 (Brent Averill) as a DI for my synths/MPC
3) A Mbox to "port" all my cubase files over to ProTools LE so that I can take it to a top notch local studio to do vocal tracking + mixdown. It seems my life would be a lot easier if I bounce all my individual tracks into Pro Tools at home rather than wasting time doing it at a studio.

I also have an old Rode NTK (it sounds ****ty), which I could use to simply lay down vocals as "placeholders". Again, final vocals would be recorded at a Pro Studio - I'm thinking of CRC in Chicago.

I figure this would be the best use of my $$$. I'm a producer/singer, and not necessarily a Mixing Engineer. I would rather spend my money on getting a top front end and making some sweet music, and pay some of the Mixing professionals on this board take care of the mixing for me.

Would you guys recommend anything different equipment/strategy wise ?

Thanks again.
Old 10th July 2005
  #2
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunrck

Would you guys recommend anything different equipment/strategy wise ?

Thanks again.

Sounds all good to me.

The only thing i could think is maybe an 8 channel converter/DI if you wanted to track all of the MPC outputs at once.

I would say though even if you decide not to do an MBOX, you can always bounce the files form beginning to end in Cubase and import them in PT at the studio.

Other than that how you are thinking of tracking/mixing in a better situation is professional and will yield other results in the long run besides the sonic benefits.
Old 10th July 2005
  #3
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Krubbadoo's Avatar
 

Maybe you should give the Focusrite 428 with AD option a try. I love the sound of ISA 110 for tracking synths and it has that silky top end for RnB vocals.
Old 10th July 2005
  #4
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

I'd take a very different strategy.

I'd put most of my energy into finding the best possible songs. Then use the gear you have to fine-tune song structure, modulations, tempo and key.

Now find the finest rhythm section in the country and cut REAL basic tracks based on what you have mocked up in Cubase.

What you need MOST is a hit record. It opens the door to all the rest. What you don't need is to sound like everybody else!

What our industry needs is another Berry Gordy, Smokey Robinson or Lamont Dozier.
Old 10th July 2005
  #5
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DirkB's Avatar
All good advice here.

However, if you're producing yourself AND doing the singing, I'd find a mic that matches your vocal, a solid preamp (BAE312 is fine, use it all the time on any vocal) and a good 2ch AD converter (which you'll need anyway).

I'd get a pro engineer into your homestudio to help you sort out an appropriate way to record your vocal. By doing this, you'll be able to record yourself in the comfort of your own situation and won't have the pressure of a big dollar room when laying down the most important part of the song.

Then, bring your stuff to a pro mixer and let him mix it.

Just a thought.

Good luck,
Dirk
Old 10th July 2005
  #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirkB
All good advice here.

However, if you're producing yourself AND doing the singing, I'd find a mic that matches your vocal, a solid preamp (BAE312 is fine, use it all the time on any vocal) and a good 2ch AD converter (which you'll need anyway).

I'd get a pro engineer into your homestudio to help you sort out an appropriate way to record your vocal. By doing this, you'll be able to record yourself in the comfort of your own situation and won't have the pressure of a big dollar room when laying down the most important part of the song.

Then, bring your stuff to a pro mixer and let him mix it.

Just a thought.

Good luck,
Dirk
He said he is only using the Rode as a "place holder".

I think not having the so-called pressure of a big dollar studio has been more of a detriment than an aid.

Having pressure to deliver in a certain time can atually be a good thing.

It forces you to do your best in the moment and not drag it out thinking your best will come later.

Also i spoke of some of the benefits of working at a bigger studio that are not sonic related.

One of them being contacts.

You can't make contacts in the business working at home.

At a bigger studio you are likely to meet more people that are in the business.

Sometimes they are just hanging out in the lounges.

They invite themselves to hear what you are working on.

Voila you are in.

Also if you are really a hot producer and bring business the studio will take notice.

When opportunities come up they are most likely to recommend someone they know who is good(hopefully you) and who will bring the business back to the studio.

Its how the network has always worked and believe it or not still does.

Sometimes getting out of the home studio bubble will yield amazing results if you put yourself out there.
Old 10th July 2005
  #7
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DirkB's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor
He said he is only using the Rode as a "place holder".

I think not having the so-called pressure of a big dollar studio has been more of a detriment than an aid.

Having pressure to deliver in a certain time can atually be a good thing.

It forces you to do your best in the moment and not drag it out thinking your best will come later.

Also i spoke of some of the benefits of working at a bigger studio that are not sonic related.

One of them being contacts.

You can't make contacts in the business working at home.

At a bigger studio you are likely to meet more people that are in the business.

Sometimes they are just hanging out in the lounges.

They invite themselves to hear what you are working on.

Voila you are in.

Also if you are really a hot producer and bring business the studio will take notice.

When opportunities come up they are most likely to recommend someone they know who is good(hopefully you) and who will bring the business back to the studio.

Its how the network has always worked and believe it or not still does.

Sometimes getting out of the home studio bubble will yield amazing results if you put yourself out there.
Agreed, and he'll be in the top dollar studio to mix, so he'll get some of that anyway.

I just wanted to offer a different perspective. Singing is a very personal thing and some excell under pressure, some don't. Some singers fire themselves up to record, only to find out after 3-4 takes that today is not there moment to shine. For rythm tracking, if the budget is there, I'd always go for a group of experienced musicians in a great room. But I feel for vocal tracking, the mood of the singer and therefor a place they feel comfortable at, is the main thing.

For some that might be under time pressure in a pro studio, for others it might be in the comfort of their own place at any time they feel like it.

Greetings,
Dirk
Old 10th July 2005
  #8
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Olhsson
I'd take a very different strategy.

I'd put most of my energy into finding the best possible songs. Then use the gear you have to fine-tune song structure, modulations, tempo and key.

Now find the finest rhythm section in the country and cut REAL basic tracks based on what you have mocked up in Cubase.

What you need MOST is a hit record. It opens the door to all the rest. What you don't need is to sound like everybody else!

What our industry needs is another Berry Gordy, Smokey Robinson or Lamont Dozier.
Hi Bob,

Thanks for your reply. Coming from someone who's had the opportunity to work alongside some legends in this genre, I highly value your opinion.

I already place a LOT of emphasis on song structure and rhythm. I'm still an old skool/mid skool RnB freak a la Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Boyz II Men and Brian Mcknight. That's my style of music. I guess this new gear I'm about to purchase is simply to lay down all these songs that I've written over the years. My music is piano driven and my inspirations and songwriting occur mostly while at the piano.

I'll PM you some of my completed tracks once I get it all tracked and mixed down.
Old 10th July 2005
  #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirkB
But I feel for vocal tracking, the mood of the singer and therefor a place they feel comfortable at, is the main thing.

For some that might be under time pressure in a pro studio, for others it might be in the comfort of their own place at any time they feel like it.

Greetings,
Dirk
First of all I've never worked with one(singer) that was successful who couldn't sing under pressure.

And they all prefered to sing in the big studio than the home studio.

You can create a comfortable atmosphere in a big studio.

The thing is most artists want to feel special.

They want to feel like they are unique and for that day they are the best.

Recording in a bigger place, with the big board and lots of room to camp out in goes towards creating that special vibe.

You can add all the carpeting,candles,tiki bars and anything else as well.
Old 10th July 2005
  #10
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor
He said he is only using the Rode as a "place holder".

I think not having the so-called pressure of a big dollar studio has been more of a detriment than an aid.

Having pressure to deliver in a certain time can atually be a good thing.

It forces you to do your best in the moment and not drag it out thinking your best will come later.

Also i spoke of some of the benefits of working at a bigger studio that are not sonic related.

One of them being contacts.

You can't make contacts in the business working at home.

At a bigger studio you are likely to meet more people that are in the business.

Sometimes they are just hanging out in the lounges.

They invite themselves to hear what you are working on.

Voila you are in.

Also if you are really a hot producer and bring business the studio will take notice.

When opportunities come up they are most likely to recommend someone they know who is good(hopefully you) and who will bring the business back to the studio.

Its how the network has always worked and believe it or not still does.

Sometimes getting out of the home studio bubble will yield amazing results if you put yourself out there.
I tend to agree with ThrillFactor here. I think artists should make use of commercial recording/mixing facilities - that's exactly what they are there for. Why spend countless amount of resources ($$$/time) trying to reinvent the wheel when its all available to you a half hour away ? The whole project studio craze is bringing down the quality of music, in my humble opinion.

Also, like Thrill pointed out, some people (aka me), work much better under pressure. We know we have a certain amount of time to finish a recording project by and will do our best to get it done within that time frame. It limits choices and streamlines decision making, and its all captured at the best possible quality since your working at a professinal facility with individuals who truly know what they are doing.

Networking, though oftentimes ignored, could possibly be the single most important element determining a artist/producer's success. In an industry that's extremely tight to break into, this is probably the most important reason why a Singer/Producer SHOULD make use of existing professional facilities.

But then again, what the hell do I know.
Old 10th July 2005
  #11
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor
Sounds all good to me.

The only thing i could think is maybe an 8 channel converter/DI if you wanted to track all of the MPC outputs at once.

I would say though even if you decide not to do an MBOX, you can always bounce the files form beginning to end in Cubase and import them in PT at the studio.

Other than that how you are thinking of tracking/mixing in a better situation is professional and will yield other results in the long run besides the sonic benefits.

Thanks for the reply Thril.

Could you recommend cost-effective 8 channel/DIs to work with ?

I sometimes have problems tracking my MPC 2 channels at a time, as I find that the takes don't quite sound the same once they are all into Cubase. 8 Channels at a time sounds like a fantastic idea.

Also, do you think the Lynx L22 would do well for me ? Or should I invest in something better - maybe a Rosetta 800/Aurora 8 ? Again, remember that these will only be used to track MPC/Synths.

Thanks again.
Old 10th July 2005
  #12
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DirkB's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunrck
I tend to agree with ThrillFactor here. I think artists should make use of commercial recording/mixing facilities - that's exactly what they are there for. Why spend countless amount of resources ($$$/time) trying to reinvent the wheel when its all available to you a half hour away ? The whole project studio craze is bringing down the quality of music, in my humble opinion.

Also, like Thrill pointed out, some people (aka me), work much better under pressure. We know we have a certain amount of time to finish a recording project by and will do our best to get it done within that time frame. It limits choices and streamlines decision making, and its all captured at the best possible quality since your working at a professinal facility with individuals who truly know what they are doing.

Networking, though oftentimes ignored, could possibly be the single most important element determining a artist/producer's success. In an industry that's extremely tight to break into, this is probably the most important reason why a Singer/Producer SHOULD make use of existing professional facilities.

But then again, what the hell do I know.
Great, then you have found the way you want to work.

In my (humble) experience, though, it's less about the room and more about the person you're working with. A skilled engineer can help you get a great vocal recording with limited budget in your own place. If you chose to work in a commercial facility, please by all means do so. I'm sure you're going to get great results (but make sure you know who you're working with...).

Greetings,
Dirk
Old 10th July 2005
  #13
Lives for gear
 
DirkB's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor
First of all I've never worked with one(singer) that was successful who couldn't sing under pressure.
Well, I guess succesfull singers are a special bread... I guess most of them can do whatever they want, whenever they want, wherever they want, which whomever they chose to work with .

I guess Peter Gabriel and Dave Matthews (my two personal favourite singers/songwriters) chose to build there own facility to record at.

Greetings,
Dirk
Old 10th July 2005
  #14
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirkB
Great, then you have found the way you want to work.

In my (humble) experience, though, it's less about the room and more about the person you're working with. A skilled engineer can help you get a great vocal recording with limited budget in your own place. If you chose to work in a commercial facility, please by all means do so. I'm sure you're going to get great results (but make sure you know who you're working with...).

Greetings,
Dirk

Dirk.

Not to beat a dead horse...

But first of all you are assuming he has a great room at his place to track a vocal which is very important.

This could defeat the purpose of having a great mic,pre and converter.

I've mixed a lot of the home brews(super producer studios)productions and the place where things suffer most are the vocals.

You can hear where the lack of good acoustics can destroy the vocal.

Sure the midi stuff with the occassional acoustic guitar sounds terrific but the vocals are very lacking.

And i don't mean over compression or EQ(which is a problem).

This is the hardest thing to fix when mixing of all.
Old 10th July 2005
  #15
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirkB
Well, I guess succesfull singers are a special bread... I guess most of them can do whatever they want, whenever they want, wherever they want, which whomever they chose to work with .

I guess Peter Gabriel and Dave Matthews (my two personal favourite singers/songwriters) chose to build there own facility to record at.

Greetings,
Dirk

You don't really consider Real World a home studio do you?

Come on man this is not fair.

Most guys if you notice who do that are guys who like to do everything, which is to their help or detriment.
Old 10th July 2005
  #16
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DirkB's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor
Dirk.

Not to beat a dead horse...

But first of all you are assuming he has a great room at his place to track a vocal which is very important.

This could defeat the purpose of having a great mic,pre and converter.

I've mixed a lot of the home brews(super producer studios)productions and the place where things suffer most are the vocals.

You can hear where the lack of good acoustics can destroy the vocal.

Sure the midi stuff with the occassional acoustic guitar sounds terrific but the vocals are very lacking.

And i don't mean over compression or EQ(which is a problem).

This is the hardest thing to fix when mixing of all.
Well, for some more beating heh .

In a top notch situation, I completely agree. However, more so than the acoustic environment, you want to have the talent feeling their best to shine. That, a not overly bright place, some gobos, a matching recording chain (mic, preamp, converter) could be a great way to record vocals.

It's just a different perspective. I bet a lot of those not so good recordings from homestudios could have been greatly improved when a professional engineer was brought in to assess the situation and make the most of it.

But if he wants to record in a big studio and has the money for it, I'd say go for it.
I definitely hope to someday have the budget to record the drums at Galaxy studios in their hall which is about an hours drive from my place... .

Greetings,
Dirk
Old 10th July 2005
  #17
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DirkB's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor
You don't really consider Real World a home studio do you?

Come on man this is not fair.

Most guys if you notice who do that are guys who like to do everything, which is to their help or detriment.
Well, you limited the discussion to "succesfull singers" and my point is they can do whatever feels right to them. Hell, PG decided to make his own consoles, I'll bet mics are to follow .

Greetings,
Dirk
Old 10th July 2005
  #18
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor
First of all I've never worked with one(singer) that was successful who couldn't sing under pressure...
Everybody I worked with sang BETTER under pressure. People simply don't "rise to the occasion" at home!

Every artist who has had a hit album since around 1970 has built their own state-of-the-art studio. Very very few have ever performed on a hit at home. None I can think of came up with their first hit at home.

The biggest career mistake I ever made was when I began working mostly in project and home studios during the 1970s. It's about who knows how good you are. Nobody ever finds out about you in a home studio!
Old 10th July 2005
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirkB
Well, for some more beating heh .

Hey Dirk beat away!!! heh
(that sounds a little too S&M doesn't it?)

Quote:
Originally Posted by DirkB
In a top notch situation, I completely agree. However, more so than the acoustic environment, you want to have the talent feeling their best to shine. That, a not overly bright place, some gobos, a matching recording chain (mic, preamp, converter) could be a great way to record vocals.



Greetings,
Dirk
I guess i've always been one of those guys that have felt that in order for the studio to serve its purpose best it should be a place you go to, not a place you come home to.

I've always liked the feeling that i am going to the studio to work or to do a job.

It helps me stay on my toes and not waste time.

When i leave it to go home it stays there.

And the next day it starts all over again.

And i have a project mix studio...

but not in my house but in a commercial space.

And yeah i have the shiny gear with the big board and big ass speakers cause when clients come over and they see this stuff they think in their minds that they have arrived.

And i mean business!!!

No joking around.
Old 11th July 2005
  #20
Here for the gear
 

It depends if you have the discipline to turn your home or project studio into a business studio. We all wish we could work closer to our home so as not to waste valuable time on travel and when work is at home we whinge at how we're too lazy to get any proper work done. If your home is at the right location and you treat it like a commercial studio, I don't see how you can not get the right contacts. Though there are some people still thinking that home studios is unprofessional and a backyarder, but there are some serious home studios out there that can easily keep up with the best of the commercial facilitities.
Old 11th July 2005
  #21
Lives for gear
 

question?

if u had a U87, great mic pre & comp and the same engineer that would be recording ur vocals in the "big studio" at your personal spot would the song come out the same?

is the shine and bling factor needed to record a good vocal?

I'm a producer, not an engineer, and we have recorded mariah, beyonce, joe (the singer), trey songz, and others both heard and unheard of at our private spot.

And the one thing I can add to this is- If u can sing, u can sing anywhere. If u cant sing I dont care if the room is Sony A, it wont help u. Invest in a good mic that fits ur voice, a comfortable vocal booth, a good pre-amp and comp.

Just starting out, being able to work 24/7 beats waiting one week to change a note in a background vocal because u dont have enough cash to block out a full week/month.

U can get critique on ur work by networking. r&b & rap- If u live in nyc, la, chicago, atl, miami, houston, etc. go to the industry events and meet people. go regularly an u will see the same folks over and over again and they will come to know ur face and work it from there. That's how u stay out of the cocoon of a private studio.
Old 11th July 2005
  #22
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlotto
question?

if u had a U87, great mic pre & comp and the same engineer that would be recording ur vocals in the "big studio" at your personal spot would the song come out the same?
It depends.

Does your place have a well built sounding vocal room(and i said room not booth)?

Is it ventihilated properly?

Is your spot in a dangerous part of town?

Are there gonna be people hanging around and making noise while you are trying to work?

Are there gonna be any other distractions like the kids,the wife,the neighbors?

What if the U87 is not right for this particular song?

What if its not working properly?


Quote:
Originally Posted by jlotto

is the shine and bling factor needed to record a good vocal?I'm a producer, not an engineer, and we have recorded mariah, beyonce, joe (the singer), trey songz, and others both heard and unheard of at our private spot.
For some yes.

For some no.

Some people like feeling special that all stops are pulled out for their project(Wilson Pickett who i've worked with for example).

It had to be the big show or nothing.

I've also tracked Joe, Dave Hollister and Kelly Price in the studio.

They are from a different era.

Because they are used to how producers work nowadays they can hang easier.

But they all had a certain expectations how things should be.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jlotto
And the one thing I can add to this is- If u can sing, u can sing anywhere. If u cant sing I dont care if the room is Sony A, it wont help u.
Again everyone is different.



Quote:
Originally Posted by jlotto
Invest in a good mic that fits ur voice, a comfortable vocal booth, a good pre-amp and comp.
No argument here.



Quote:
Originally Posted by jlotto

Just starting out, being able to work 24/7 beats waiting one week to change a note in a background vocal because u dont have enough cash to block out a full week/month.
Now this is a stretch if you ask me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jlotto

U can get critique on ur work by networking. r&b & rap- If u live in nyc, la, chicago, atl, miami, houston, etc. go to the industry events and meet people. go regularly an u will see the same folks over and over again and they will come to know ur face and work it from there. That's how u stay out of the cocoon of a private studio.

I don't disagree but its different when its in the studio.

You can network and get work faster because the work can be heard right there.

Also they may ask you to come right in and add something(which happens more often than people think).

Again i am not saying that working in a home studio does not have advantages.

It has many.

I am just saying there are also other benefits you can miss out if you are just stuck into one way of working.
Old 11th July 2005
  #23
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thethrillfactor
The only thing i could think is maybe an 8 channel converter/DI if you wanted to track all of the MPC outputs at once.
Hey Thrill. Any specific advice here?
Old 11th July 2005
  #24
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jlotto
question?

if u had a U87, great mic pre & comp and the same engineer that would be recording ur vocals in the "big studio" at your personal spot would the song come out the same?
Not if your personal spot didn't have the same level of investment in acoustics and isolation from outside noise.

A great vocal room will allow the singer to work as much as 3 to 5 feet back from the mike without losing presence. Working that far back radically reduces the need for compression which increases the "balls" of the vocal sound dramatically. Assuming you want to sell some records, obtaining a vocal sound that really comes across powerfully on the air has more going for it than hype, shine and bling!
Old 11th July 2005
  #25
no ssl yet
Guest
Agree to disagree

I have a home studio, and I record my own vocals. WITH GOOD RESULTS! HOWEVER. I Started out recording at commercial studios with some great engineers and I learned from them. With that said. It took me alot longer to learn recording(because it was an interest of mine) than it would have taken to hire an engineer. After learning basic technique, I had to learn what signal chains complemented what vocal.

With that said, I work with a bunch of RnB artists that do the same, and EVERY single one doesnt do stellar vocal until someone is there to record them. I think most folk need to concentrate on the performance and not the recording. I have them record there ideas at home and use protools as a scratch pad, then re record at my place.

I've recently moved my gear to a room at home from my commercial space and I'm loving the feeling of not having to leave home to work. BUT my rule is that I only go into that area of the house to work and I dont take distractions in with me (cell phone etc....) THough that is where the computer and
Gearslutz is
Old 11th July 2005
  #26
no ssl yet
Guest
Thrill

I think Thrill brought up a good question that should not be overlooked "IS the studio in a decent neighborhood" Security is also important. Hell if someone breaks into the studio they also steal your personal ****. I have alot of personal belongings that cant be replaced while most gear can.

Man I do alot of Hip Hop/RnB and its not every artist that I would want to have working at my house!!!

Plus I cant help thinking in a bigger city being In and out of a commercial room, I'd get alot more work/networking opportunities
Old 11th July 2005
  #27
Lives for gear
 
Dangerous Dave's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Olhsson

What our industry needs is another Berry Gordy, Smokey Robinson or Lamont Dozier.
Bob, I couldn't agree more.

Peace

DD
Old 11th July 2005
  #28
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Olhsson
A great vocal room will allow the singer to work as much as 3 to 5 feet back from the mike without losing presence. Working that far back radically reduces the need for compression which increases the "balls" of the vocal sound dramatically. Assuming you want to sell some records, obtaining a vocal sound that really comes across powerfully on the air has more going for it than hype, shine and bling!
we've done vocals in our spot, in our vocal booth, constructed by our engineer, with everyone from mariah, beyonce to gold/platinum rappers. never recorded any vocals 5 ft back from the mic. mind u we have c800g, u87, neve, focusrite, tube tech, avalon as choices for vocal chain that this kid startin out probably wont have.

when i was with Trackmasters we had everyone in their momma come thru the spot in the small ass basement of the house. vocal booth was far from "perfect big studio specs" but most of those songs were still big sellers.

how many producers have personal rooms in Sony out of converted lounges & utility rooms, etc? many and the booths in there are no where near the quality of the main rooms in that joint. as long as the mic doesn't pick up outside noises the show goes on.

u guys forget this dude is just starting out. no record deal, no budget.
Old 11th July 2005
  #29
Here for the gear
 

Yeah but bob, is 3-5 feet the norm to get great vocals. The Engineers I have come across always record between 1 hand length or a bit more from the mic for main vocals, even engineers at commercial facilities. Are most top engineers using this more than 3 feet technique?
Old 11th July 2005
  #30
Motown legend
 
Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by baman
Yeah but bob, is 3-5 feet the norm to get great vocals...
Only in a great room when the engineer realizes this method is a powerful creative possibility.

I embraced the project studio approach myself after I left Detroit but I never kid myself about there not being a significant difference. There are great rooms that aren't 5k a day and there are crappy ones that cost even more. My point is that there is a huge benefit beyond being fashionable to doing vocals a truly great room.
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