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how to learn an SSL without going to a school
Old 16th June 2005
  #1
Gear Nut
 

how to learn an SSL without going to a school

Sooo,

I am going to be moving to california soon. I know a few people out there that have some leads on runner and intern positions and they all said, " Do you know an SSL?" Well, I don't. I'm living and working in Pittsburgh and SSL's just don't exist here. If a studio had one, I'd be all up ons. Going back to a recording school is out of the question, I'm still trying to pay off my first degree. What, do I do? I know the obvious answer, find a small studio that I can squeeze my way into and learn asap. Is there anything more to it than that? If LA is the recording mecca should I go to another smaller city in Cali to find a smaller studio with an SSL that might be easier to squeeze into.

Do they sell just the manual? I taught myself pro tools by reading and re-reading and re-reading the manual until all was clear.

Perhaps I could just track bands at home and get them to pay for someone to mix it at an SSL equipped studio where the studio/ mix engineer would be kind enough to let me watch or assist. This would be the best route to take but probably the most difficult to have happen with any regularity since everyone seems to be broke nowadays. Any of you have or work at ssl places in cali? Pm me if something like this would interest you.

Gripe time. The SSL hang up is quite frustrating since all i've been reading about is how budgets are shrinking, big studios are closing, and projects are even being mixed in the box. But whatever, that's out of the system and it's all forward momentum from here.

Help me out slutz

later

carl
Old 16th June 2005
  #2
Lives for gear
 
audioez's Avatar
 

ok, here it is...Go to a studio and work for free like evryone else does....or just go buy an SSL manual and read away...I suggest going to work at an SSL room, GO FOR IT
Old 16th June 2005
  #3
Lives for gear
 
gyraf's Avatar
 

Advanced recording primer - SSL4000:

http://www.recordinginstitute.com/y2kplus/ARP/sslb.html

Jakob E.
Old 16th June 2005
  #4
Lives for gear
 
The Alamo's Avatar
 

Carl,

For starters, buying the manual wouldn't be a bad option. I bought mine from SSL at Wilshire Blvd. I believe it was $80-90 for both (the console manual and the computer manual for the 4k). When I started out interning they didn't want me to take the manuals off the shelf all the time, although the studio manager encouraged me to read it anyway. So I bought it, read it twice and realized it's not all that difficult anyway. Then after working on SSL's for a while I read it once more.

Oh, and did I mention going to an SSL studio and working for free?

(Remember) The Alamo
Old 16th June 2005
  #5
From the SSL website

Training

SSL employs a dedicated team of expert training staff. Operational training can be arranged at SSL or a client's facility. Additional training courses are held by arrangement at SSL's fully equipped studio facility in the UK. These courses are available to both client's and freelance engineers. Maintenance training is also available by arrangement. If you have a specific SSL training enquiry please contact [email protected]

In addition, a number of international educational facilities use SSL consoles as part of their training faciilities. A list of these can be found here:

http://www.solid-state-logic.com/res...ks/studios.php

Old 16th June 2005
  #6
Lives for gear
 
audioez's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Alamo
Oh, and did I mention going to an SSL studio and working for free?
Yes, get to work, if it means anything, you'll be a star some day!!! and we'll be asking you to mix music on your SSL,
Old 16th June 2005
  #7
Gear Nut
 

yay,

working for free!!!

anybody round these parts own a facility in cali that would let me do this sometime in the fall?

Are studios big enough to own an ssl cool with you having a day job while working for free?
Old 15th August 2005
  #9
Lives for gear
 
Igotsoul4u's Avatar
Never seen a runner need to know a thing about an SSL. Sounds like stupid recording school graduate talk.
Old 15th August 2005
  #10
Gear Nut
 

thanks for the links guys

it doesn't look all that different from any other console!

nukmusic: I did not go to rec school, but sometimes I wish I did, just for the additional few inches of foot in the door it may have brought.
Old 15th August 2005
  #11
One with big hooves
 
Jay Kahrs's Avatar
I'd snap back "Which SSL?"

Seriously, there's a bunch of 'em out there and a 4000G is different then a 9000J which are totally different beasts then an Axiom or the post desks (which I've never worked on)

If you did manage to land a job as an assistent and you're pretty savy, you could get into the studio when it's not being used, sit down with the manual and start to work through it. It's not all that hard though...automation is automation and all system's have their various quirks to figure out.

FWIW, recording skool won't do much for you. I went for a year and realized I knew a lot of what they were teaching me. I dropped out, landed an internship and never looked back.
Old 15th August 2005
  #12
Lives for gear
 
nukmusic's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by c.dizzle
thanks for the links guys

it doesn't look all that different from any other console!

nukmusic: I did not go to rec school, but sometimes I wish I did, just for the additional few inches of foot in the door it may have brought.
heh peep the link above. and the few below:

http://www.solid-state-logic.com/sup...ts/xl9000k.php
http://www.solid-state-logic.com/sup...Do=&product=XL

http://www.solid-state-logic.com/sup...ts/sl9000j.php

http://www.solid-state-logic.com/sup...nts/sl4000.php

http://www.solid-state-logic.com/support/
Old 15th August 2005
  #13
Lives for gear
 
bjornson's Avatar
 

This is funny!!!
Carl, go over to my bookshelf and you'll find a 4000g+ manual,
complete with life size porn poster of the channel strips, master section
and Ultimation.
Sometimes the answers are in your lap and you don't even know it!!!!

As long as I'm here I'm gonna make you blush!

ATTENTION!!
This young man would be a great asset to any studio.
He has great ears, client skills and a solid work ethic.
I wish he could continue to work for me but he has outgrown this environment.
I really can't speak highly enough of him. I wish him the best on his journey!
Dave Bjornson
Old 16th August 2005
  #14
Gear Maniac
 
jmiller's Avatar
 

I worked two years as a runner and am now an assistant (and 2nd assistant on large orchestral sessions). I work in a three room facility, one room of which houses an SSL9000j. I still have not yet learned the SSL (this is mainly because it has been more prudent for me to learn the other rooms before dipping into the SSL, for various reasons). You do not need to know an SSL to get a job as a runner or intern.

I always see resume's with a "training" section that reads something like this: Extensive experience with Neve, SSL, API Pro Tools, etc etc etc. What it should say is: Clorox, Windex, Hoover, dustmops, wetmops, and Q-Tips. Because you'll spend a lot more time with that stuff than you will with gear at first. I can't imagine going to school for a year and touching all that awesome gear only to have piss and poo all over you for the next year or two after you get out.

Anyways, in answer to your question, get a job as a runner or intern at a studio with an ssl and read the manual. Once they can trust you, you may be able to get in that room and play around with it, in the event that the room is not in use (ours is almost always booked lately).

Also, not to discourage you from moving out here, but it's a really tight market, and living here can be expensive, so be warned. There are only so many studios in L.A. with SSL's that are looking for employees (to pay!) at any particular time. Having not worked in a recording studio before, it may be hard to get a job at such a facility. Thus, I wouldn't rule out working at a smaller studio first. You may bounce around your first year or two. You may even be able to find such a studio near where you are now- a small local studio that does commercials or something, or maybe even working at a local civic center on their sound crew or something can show you have experience with the pressures that one has to deal with in the studio. I didn't get my job because of my gear experience- I got it because I had been on small sessions before and my employers felt this meant I would know how to handle myself professionally. But this was after sending them my resume 4 or 5 times over the course of the year (they just happened to be hiring the last time, and had I not given a followup call I might not have heard from them).

Anyways, sorry for the rambling, but the jist of what I'm saying is that you can do it, just prepare yourself, and look at your options creatively. Guts and determination will go farther than a piece of paper. Good Luck!
Old 16th August 2005
  #15
Gear Maniac
 

I have the entire 9000J manual in PDF format. PM me if you're interested
Old 16th August 2005
  #16
Lives for gear
 
nukmusic's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sender
I have the entire 9000J manual in PDF format. PM me if you're interested
must be a big file? heh heh I'm very surprised that no well known engineers haven't made an instructional DVD for sell with all the basic "How TO SSL" or even with other consoles.
Old 16th August 2005
  #17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmiller
I can't imagine going to school for a year and touching all that awesome gear only to have piss and poo all over you for the next year or two after you get out.
Why not? Makes sense to me. If you graduate with a degree in economics, you aren't going to be made chairman of the fed first year out either, even though you learned all that stuff about the economy. It doesn't mean that your education won't help you, both in opening a door or two, and more importantly, giving you some background knowledge that will help you understand and appreciate the learning opportunities that come your way in an entry level position. The education will help you to be able to take advantage of opportunity as it is presented and not screw up (too badly). It will not, however, remove the necessity of gaining experience by putting in the hours, including some tasks that don't seem particularly glamorous.

This is a challenging field. Take all the advantages you can get. Prospective assistants: get a manual and learn that SSL. It can't hurt; it may help.
Old 16th August 2005
  #18
Lives for gear
 
joaquin's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bjornson
This is funny!!!
Carl, go over to my bookshelf and you'll find a 4000g+ manual,
complete with life size porn poster of the channel strips, master section
and Ultimation.
Sometimes the answers are in your lap and you don't even know it!!!!

As long as I'm here I'm gonna make you blush!

ATTENTION!!
This young man would be a great asset to any studio.
He has great ears, client skills and a solid work ethic.
I wish he could continue to work for me but he has outgrown this environment.
I really can't speak highly enough of him. I wish him the best on his journey!
Dave Bjornson
Men...I almost **** in my pants with the music intro to your website!! heh
Amazing place!!
Good Luck Carl. With Mr Bjornson's words you got the "extra inches for the foot in the door"
Old 16th August 2005
  #19
Lives for gear
 
Jose Mrochek's Avatar
 

Working around a 9000j is very straight forward. Very simple. If you can run any console, stepping up to a 9j is very easy. You will be all over it in a few days.

Making a good sounding record is a different story.

Best of luck to you, I did an intership at a big studio and it was all well worth it. Go to LA, and try to find a gig at the biggest studio you can find. Don't waste your time in the small ones. Worry about knowing people at this stage, you will have plenty of time to learn the SSL and making records later. NETWORK. Is the key.
Old 16th August 2005
  #20
More cowbell!
 
natpub's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jose Mrochek
Working around a 9000j is very straight forward. Very simple. If you can run any console, stepping up to a 9j is very easy. You will be all over it in a few days.

Agree with Jose. It is not some kind of mystery board. Doing it quickly and efficiently is another matter.

P.S. I hope your degree is in music----cheers! :-)
Old 17th August 2005
  #21
Old 17th August 2005
  #22
Gear Maniac
 

As many have said, the 9J isn't that hard of a console to learn. It's slightly daunting at first but, on the whole, is not bad. The automation system and some of then signal flow nuances can be very hard to master though.

I've gotten alot of requests about the 9J manual. I'll post a copy later tonight. Check the thread later to get a copy.
Old 19th August 2005
  #23
Lives for gear
 
nukmusic's Avatar
 

more on the SSL 4000:

Downloads

there is also a **** load of other info here

http://www.mtsu.edu/~dsmitche/

just click on the "RIM ###"
Old 19th August 2005
  #24
Lives for gear
 

Pretty sure that you can download a PDF of the manual from SSL's web site.
Old 20th August 2005
  #25
Gear Addict
 
simonv's Avatar
 

I've never worked on an SSL myself.

But I've always obeyed the first rule I've learned, and I've always been OK:

IN --goes to-- OUT
OUT --goes to-- IN

Now let's record music.
How much more complicated could it be?
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