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Steven slate samples and Eq
Old 6th September 2008
  #1
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jackdrummer's Avatar
 

Steven slate samples and Eq

Hi Everyone!
I've bought Steven Slate samples 6 months ago.
During this time I've found thath to match the tone of the sample(wich are great!) of my own recordings I've to use a lot of Eqing especially in the high region(kind of +13 at 2,5 Khz and +11 at 9 Khz for the kick!!!)
I don't think that a so large amount of Eq is a right thing so:
Is my micing technique or my room or ......something else that is wrong?

Thank you!

Jack
Old 6th September 2008
  #2
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Well most of those samples are designed for rock, and yes you would typically be adding quite a lot of high end and compressing in a certain way *which also increases the perception of brightness sometimes* to make them attack and cut through the wall of guitars. You can make drums more or less bright depending on how they're mic'd and which mics are used but not to the extent that they might need to be for this sort of production style.

Rather than concentrate on the 13k plus range, I'd look at what is happening around 2-5k. Thats the tricky area but it yields the most 'attack' and prescense in the track.

Now obviously you can make a single hit sample brighter than perhaps a recorded snare in a track because you dont have to worry about bringing hats up so much. This is where samples are your friend. Say you have a drummer who has hit the hats too hard, or say the hats themselves are not ideal, or say you're given a track with less than perfect snare micing, you might find that you just cant get the brightness into the snare without bringing up too much hat. So you can use the sample underneath to inject the bright attack that you need. It's a compromise but it's also the nature of the drum sound in a lot of modern rock records.

J
Old 6th September 2008
  #3
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jackdrummer's Avatar
 

Thank you, Jack!
Old 15th September 2008
  #4
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Hi Jack. I have a motto. It goes like this. "Don't be a pussy with EQ". There is no right and wrong.. only "sounds good" and "sounds like ass". Whatever it takes to get to the first one, do it.
Old 15th September 2008
  #5
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Kris's Avatar
Start with the drum first...
Old 15th September 2008
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kris View Post
Start with the drum first...
needs not to be said.. but still good that it was said! and while we're on that ship... the room.. the mic choice, the preamp, and let us not forget the dude hitting it...
Old 15th September 2008
  #7
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Kris's Avatar
The head and the pedal as well...
The amount of muffling/tape/padding inside...
Old 15th September 2008
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdrummer View Post
Hi Everyone!
I've bought Steven Slate samples 6 months ago.
During this time I've found thath to match the tone of the sample(wich are great!) of my own recordings I've to use a lot of Eqing especially in the high region(kind of +13 at 2,5 Khz and +11 at 9 Khz for the kick!!!)
I don't think that a so large amount of Eq is a right thing so:
Is my micing technique or my room or ......something else that is wrong?

Thank you!

Jack
That does sound like allot of EQ! The Steven Slate stuff is pre-mixed as far as I understand so will have a fair bit of EQ'ing and compression and all that good stuff.

You never told us your recording chain.

The most obvious difference to me between a "high-end" bit of kit and a "semi-pro" bit of kit is the presence or "right there in the speaker"ness.
As a general rule that accounts for mic pre-amps and A/Ds. Most people can afford a couple of 57's, right?

It is possible to EQ/Limit/Compress that excitement or presence into a recording made on consumer (pro-sumer?) equipment but it can sometimes be to the detriment of the overall sound, in terms of distortion and overall nastiness.

Since you have paid for your Steven Slate CD why not use the samples to bring in the top-end presence? Let your recordings carry the meat and bones and add a little gravy with a sample. A dash of sample "augmentation" can go a long way.
Old 15th September 2008
  #9
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Flying_Dutchman's Avatar
 

off course i can´t speak for your mixes.
IMAO the Slate samples can take a lot of eq to sit great in a song.
I always start to mix with mid -signals, first voice, than guitars, than drums than bass. Off course drums than need some large dips, some against the voice, against the guaitars eq. Slate samples take it well. Does other samples take it too? yes, somestimes, off course. IT´s "just" drums, a percussive sound always sound better strong equed than a voice or a guitar imao. But the Slates are good.
Old 16th September 2008
  #10
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jackdrummer's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkRB View Post
That does sound like allot of EQ! The Steven Slate stuff is pre-mixed as far as I understand so will have a fair bit of EQ'ing and compression and all that good stuff.

You never told us your recording chain.

The most obvious difference to me between a "high-end" bit of kit and a "semi-pro" bit of kit is the presence or "right there in the speaker"ness.
As a general rule that accounts for mic pre-amps and A/Ds. Most people can afford a couple of 57's, right?

It is possible to EQ/Limit/Compress that excitement or presence into a recording made on consumer (pro-sumer?) equipment but it can sometimes be to the detriment of the overall sound, in terms of distortion and overall nastiness.

Since you have paid for your Steven Slate CD why not use the samples to bring in the top-end presence? Let your recordings carry the meat and bones and add a little gravy with a sample. A dash of sample "augmentation" can go a long way.
My concern was about making my own drum sound as good as that of Steven!

So,comparing my own sounds with that of SSD I've noticed that to reach "that" sound I needed alot of Eq.Way way more than I was told in many books I've read and many discussion I've made!
Old 16th September 2008
  #11
If you are using the right mics, pres and technique you can get your drums plenty
bright, without that kind of eq. if I used as much top end boost my drums would take your head off
Old 17th September 2008
  #12
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BradM's Avatar
I didn't see Mr. Slate saying he wasn't use heaps of EQ to get the sounds to the state you hear when you trigger them. heh

Brad
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