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Yamaha C6 piano...
Old 4th February 2003
  #1
Capitol Studios Paris
 
jon's Avatar
 

Yamaha C6 piano...

Hey guys,

I have a friend who is proposing to sell his 10-year old Yamaha C6 for $11k. It's in decent shape and plays very well. The hammers in the middle are starting to sound slightly mellower than the rest, though, and the black paint is somewhat faded in various spots all over.

What do you think of the C6 (as opposed to, say, a C7)....sound-wise, genre-wise and client-wise?

Is it a "good" piano in terms of repute for a commercial studio, and what's it worth?

Jon
Old 4th February 2003
  #2
Moderator emeritus
 

Re: Yamaha C6 piano...

Quote:
Originally posted by jon

Is it a "good" piano in terms of repute for a commercial studio, and what's it worth?

Jon
Well, I regularly work at a studio with a C6 - it's useable and sounds fine, but it doesn't sound like a great piano (AKA a good steinway or even a C7). At 10 years old, it wouldn't have the MIDI outputs, would it? That's awfuly useable (being able to trigger MIDI synths as you track the acoustic piano).

I don't know the European market, but it seems a bit high (Considering that I turned down an 11 year old C7 a couple of weeks ago for $15K, due to a lack of a spare $15K); have you done the usual web searches for a comparison?
Old 4th February 2003
  #3
Lives for gear
 
RKrizman's Avatar
 

Re: Yamaha C6 piano...

Quote:
Originally posted by jon
Hey guys,

I have a friend who is proposing to sell his 10-year old Yamaha C6 for $11k. It's in decent shape and plays very well. The hammers in the middle are starting to sound slightly mellower than the rest, though, and the black paint is somewhat faded in various spots all over.

What do you think of the C6 (as opposed to, say, a C7)....sound-wise, genre-wise and client-wise?

Is it a "good" piano in terms of repute for a commercial studio, and what's it worth?

Jon
If it's a C6 instead of a C7 you'll have to rent it for 1/7 less.

-R
Old 12th March 2003
  #4
Capitol Studios Paris
 
jon's Avatar
 

Despite its name, a C6 is the same width and height as a C7, nearly about the same weight, and only about 7 inches less deep.

I'm not sure how different the two really are other than that the C7 will play a bit louder.

I like the Yamaha sound for rock/pop, but the general advice I've been hearing is to get a Steinway B to appeal to the jazz/classical folks too.

Anyone want to chime in on the qualities of various pianos for studio use?
Old 12th March 2003
  #5
Lives for gear
 
C.Lambrechts's Avatar
 

IMVHO you should get a steinway B Jon. I know a lot of classical pianists / soloists and they won't even consider playing anything else but a Steinway unless it is for use as an Orchestra instrument. They'll open up the keyboard ... see Steinway and go aaaaahhhh ..... see Yamaha and go yuk .... even before playing the instrument.

Another thought is that it will be far easier convincing someone who asks for a Yamaha to play on a Steinway then the other way around.

Or one couls also put it this way :

- do you wanna mix on an SSL or a DDA ?
- do you wanna play the Yamaha or the Steinway ?


SSL and Steinway have that magic ring to it. You allready have one .... stick to that line and get the other one too.

(btw, I'm very good friends with a Piano Rental company over here in Belgium who also operates a lot in Paris. He's a very nice guy and knows all about the differences between yamaha and steinway ... he owns all of them in his rental company. I can get you guys in touch if you want.)
Old 13th March 2003
  #6
Lives for gear
 
RKrizman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally posted by jon

I like the Yamaha sound for rock/pop, but the general advice I've been hearing is to get a Steinway B to appeal to the jazz/classical folks too.
Keep in mind that the variation between instruments of a given brand can be almost as significant as the variation between brands. If you're not a pianist, no matter which brand you choose, find somebody whose taste you trust to give you an evaluation. I haven't had much experience with Steinways, but with Yamahas the trick is to find one that is bright enough to speak clearly and work in a dense track (easy to find) but also has the depth of tone for more serious work (not as easy). (And don't think that a hammer adjustment will change everything.) And if you're buying used, don't buy one that has had the hammers laquered, and beware of grey market Japanese models (they usually have only two pedals, but not always).

Pianos are like women (you can run with that thought yourself . . . )

-R
Old 13th March 2003
  #7
Mindreader
 
BevvyB's Avatar
 

How many world class recording facilities are there in Paris?
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