The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Gear Prices and State of the Business Condenser Microphones
Old 11th September 2007
  #1
Lives for gear
 
jindrich's Avatar
 

Gear Prices and State of the Business

Want a U47? Then shell out no less than $6,500.

So goes the song. $6,500 is for instance the new price Wunder recently set for its praised CM7. It's also the figure going on for similar U47 clones from other manufactures such as Telefunken, Wagner, Flea, Korby... etc. An original U47 may probably cost much more than that in the second hand market. So $6,500 appears to be the entry ticket for the usual professional world class LVOX mic.

Now, think for a second: $6,500 is a hell of a lot of money.


As an small exercise, let me compare what $6,500 can get you these days in other fields of the Entertainment/Arts Industry. This is a topic I recently discused with some friends working in such categories, Photographers, Video Post editors and Freelance CamOperators, among others. So, what do $6,500 bring you? Let's see:

-Photography: a Top of the line Canon 1DmkIII or Nikon D3 digital Camera plus a Professional 24-70mm f2.8 high grade zoom lens.

-VideoPost: a complete broadcast edit suite comprised of a fully loaded 8-core MacPro, 23" screen and Final Cut Pro Studio.

-TV Camera: the new Sony XDCAM EX, a Flash-RAM based Broadcast-quality HD Camcorder (a just announced bomb that will revolution the Indy market), approved for HD Broadcast-level content (Discovery Channel HD) or used to shoot small budget Feature Films (transcoded later to 35mm).



Now let's go back to our Engineer/Studio owner who just dropped $6,500 in a Mic alone. What can he accomplish now? Well, nothing yet as he still needs more tools, a mic alone serves no purpose. On the other hand, when that same amount is invested in any of those mentioned fields, the acquired items already allow PROFESSIONAL work to be done and therefore serious profits to be obtained.

Truth to be said, although those items would be enough already, if you were to really set shop as a stand-alone Photographer, Video Editor or CamOperator, you'll probably invest a bigger amount in equipment, as to be able to offer a truly professional product to your clients. You'd be getting things like 2nd bodies and lenses, tripods, lightining setups, broadcast monitors, RAID HDs, printers... etc. But even then, the total investment for such professionals, (building their photo studio, video edit suite or rigs for Freelance CameraOps), wouldn't go beyond the $15k-20K mark (that amount could certainly be more, as it could also be less).


Anyhow, we set a total $20k investment in equipment. Now what about their RATES? Well, they won't charge less than $400 for a day (8hr) of work.


Well, THIS IS PRECISELY THE POINT I wanted to raise here. A $20k investment in such fields is enough to bring $400+/day rates. Actually, even just $6,500 would make it. Dare to compare that in the Studio Business?

I have no clue in the USA, but here in Europe you can easily get SSL or Neve studios with pro designed rooms for as low as $500-600 a day. I can name you a few in the UK, Spain, Germany or Sweden. Incidently, a friend of mine here with a mix room that's a GS paradise with an SSL desk, HD3, TC6000 etc, charges $50-$60/hour as base rate with serious discounts for day/week of booking.

Should we analize what are the required amounts to build RecStudios that get rates of $60/hour-$400/day, just like the Photographers and Video editors with own shop do? A quick internet research will show you that those RecStudios easily house $120k-$200k in gear, and that their acoustics needed an investment of another $80k-$100k+.

That is so insane! Amounts of $200k-$300k to obtain the same rates other fellows in other entertaiment-related fields get investing paltry $20k sums. For Pro AudioEngineers and Studio Owners, $20k hardly buys a ProTools HD3 rig. Then costly mics, outboard, monitors, patchbays, cabling, etc. must be added, and to top it all, expensive, soundproofed rooms in big rented spaces must be built for the whole thing to happen. On the contrary, a photographer or a video editor can set shop just ANYWHERE with no installation costs, and simply move the next day should the rent go up.


There's something more. Photographers and Video Editors of this world may have plenty of clients of all kinds, many being corporations that pay properly and behave accordingly, whereas on the other hand, Studio owners must face a dying Industry with very few clients, some of them being mannerless punks with a few thousands to spend in their "million dollar record".


Does this make sense to you?


I can only say, much Kudos to those still running a commercial Recording Studio.

Now excuse me, I'd like to order a new CM7.
Old 11th September 2007
  #2
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
It makes sense, but here's the problem - Gear is actually pretty cheap right now in comparison to 25 years ago. BUT, and it's a huge butt....

Studio prices are at best the same as they were 25 years ago, and often way down. Inflation has eaten us up, real estate costs are 10X's, etc., etc. Life and the rest of the economy is destroying the profitability in our industry. The fact that no one wants to pay for studio time puts a pretty big question mark on buying a $6500 mic. Now adjusted for inflation, the $6500 in '07 dollars may be a bargain compared to 20 years ago, but when studio rates are exponentially going the OPPOSITE way of costs of running a business and inflation.....THAT is the real problem.

Pandora's box has been opened and there's no putting the genie back in the bottle. The "business" side of our industry is DOA. Sure, there will always be studios and startup's and places to record, but the paradigm has shifted to being a "consumer" occupation rather than a "career" occupation.
Old 11th September 2007
  #3
Lives for gear
 
dokushoka's Avatar
 

People with money want to buy toys.

Hard working engineers with low annual incomes need to buy tools.

Unfortunately, there seem to be more of the first than the second, and prices have adjusted accordingly.

I say got out and get an AT4047sv and record some great singers.

With the money you saved, put it into some sort of interest earning account or take a vacation.
Old 11th September 2007
  #4
The paradigm has shifted to people who realize that there are $500 mics which coupled with $1,000 preamps and $2,000 hard disk recording machines and computer programs and CD duplicators and nice, relatively quiet places--these people are doing work that rivals anything coming out of the million dollar and trillion dollar establishments of old.
Old 11th September 2007
  #5
Lives for gear
 
lowfreq33's Avatar
 

I hear you about the other industries. My sister works in film (mostly camera assistant stuff) and her day rate is twice what I charge. She hasn't spent nearly what I have on tools, and I don't carry a lot of gear compared to most engineers.
Old 11th September 2007
  #6
Dan
Lives for gear
 
Dan's Avatar
 

+1 on all of that.

We all know that the music business in general is in a, um, lull. The studio industry is taking a hit from that. Tweaks can be made to the business model, but around here it seems to be a struggle of who's the best at not making money.

Of course, you can choose to not take part in that, an option less than desirable for many.
Old 11th September 2007
  #7
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

A U47 or CM7 is the high-end of that market, yet you are comparing costs to the lower end of other markets...not really fair I think.

Try to by a Panavision with $6500. Wait, you can't even buy them or rent a fully accessorized one for that price, and like mics, you'll need more than one.

Fully loaded Avid set up?

Look at the budgets of commercial movies, tv commercial, music video shots, etc. A major label music video cost for 1 song can easily be 10x the cost of recording the whole record.

The music business sucks...no one will tell you otherwise. There's no budget, no sales, and too many people in it trying to make it. Studios closing left and right, new technology and lowered costs and marketing convincing every musician that they to can make million dollar recordings in their bedroom (and worse, it has happened).

Most, if not all of us here are not in it for the money...not for moneys sake that is. If you want to make a good living, all those other choices you mentioned are very valid.

I think an AT4050 would be a better comparison to the market of the other business you were mentioning, and in that case, the playing field would be more level.
Old 11th September 2007
  #8
Gear Maniac
 
NOCCA's Avatar
 

A U47/CM7 is the high end of the mic market, but what about consoles? Or if not a console, all of the channels of Pres/EQ/Compression that you need?

Even better: Avid? Perfect analogy. Pro Tools.

But yet these professionals the film/video example continually are in more work and more often than not getting paid more.

I'm not exactly complaining (well ok I am) this is my chosen business. I wouldn't trade it for anything.
Old 11th September 2007
  #9
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NOCCA View Post
A U47/CM7 is the high end of the mic market, but what about consoles? Or if not a console, all of the channels of Pres/EQ/Compression that you need?

Even better: Avid? Perfect analogy. Pro Tools.

But yet these professionals the film/video example continually are in more work and more often than not getting paid more.

I'm not exactly complaining (well ok I am) this is my chosen business. I wouldn't trade it for anything.
They get paid a LOT more

2 main reasons:

1. Unions
2. Gross income of the product they produce.

DVD's saved the film/movie industry, CD's help the music industry, but that has worn off and mp3's/napster ain't helping any.

If there was ANY job in the picture industry I would enjoy, I would be in it in a heartbeat. Unfortunately I love music....a lot.

Dammit.

You could dig a ditch on a movie set and as long as you're union, you'd probably get paid more than the average music-only recording engineer...especially if the unioned ditch digger worked the same amount of hours.

And you wouldn't need to buy anything, not even the shovel.
Old 11th September 2007
  #10
Lives for gear
 
jindrich's Avatar
 

yeah you're right, I shouldn't have use an U47 as an example, but you get my point.

The thing is in other fields, you can offer PRO quality with a very modest investment (a whole pro photo/fashion studio for instance can be equipped fully with just $20k incl cameras and lenses, as long as you dont get digital Hasselblads), and still they get MUCH higher rates.

And as I said, they dont need an specially designed workplace. The most expensive part of a Rec Studio is the studio itself. There are no more costly 3348s Dash or 9000Js anymore, but to build a mid size Live room and Control room you need at least $300k.

Add the rest of gear. A fortune. All for a rate of $500 a day? (and let's say you're lucky and are booked regulary....).

makes no sense.


better become a make-up artist.
Old 11th September 2007
  #11
Lives for gear
 
Empire Prod's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpatterson View Post
these people are doing work that rivals anything coming out of the million dollar and trillion dollar establishments of old.

I never heard of a "trillion dollar establishment" . I wonder if they have consoles made out of pure gold.
Old 11th September 2007
  #12
Gear Maniac
 
NOCCA's Avatar
 

Yup, you don't often own a studio any more if you want to make money.

You own a studio because its what you love doing. Unfortunately they don't accept love at grocery stores...
Old 11th September 2007
  #13
Lives for gear
 
max cooper's Avatar
 

You should worry when gear prices go down, not up.
Old 11th September 2007
  #14
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

Like just about anything, 'Pro Quality' is subjective. Many have produced what even pros would consider 'pro-quality' albums on $20k worth of gear.

But if you want to talk about high-end equipment, then compare it to other high-end equipment. I think that once you take the U47/CM7 out of the equation, the comparison isn't so dramatic. No one here will argue that you cannot get a pro-quality recording out of an AT4050 at $500 cost. Whether you can convince a potential client this is so when the studio across the street has a U47 at that same studio rates as you and the AT4050, well, that's another matter. Welcome to probably the toughest business to start up or even survive....recording studios.

I don't see any big recording studio start ups that aren't in one way helped (funded) by a successful artist/producer/engineer who can sustain the business from their own work.
Old 11th September 2007
  #15
Lives for gear
 
max cooper's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
(a whole pro photo/fashion studio for instance can be equipped fully with just $20k incl cameras and lenses, as long as you dont get digital Hasselblads), and still they get MUCH higher rates.


Add the rest of gear. A fortune. All for a rate of $500 a day? (and let's say you're lucky and are booked regulary....).

better become a make-up artist.
$20k? A Profoto 2400 is $5500 just for the pack. And you need a few. Don't get me started on HMIs. Thank god for rentals.

Editorial rate for photographers has always been a few hundred plus per page rate of a few hundred. It's how I started and is barely worth doing except for the credit/tearsheet but it has to be a good pic/decent layout. After a couple of years I was getting around $5500 for a shoot day for ads/album covers. Mind you, that's a shoot day. Not like every day is a shoot day and there's lots of prep/wrap days. If you spend more than a couple years getting $500/shoot day you're either independently wealthy or crashing on someone's couch (I've seen both quite a bit.)
Old 11th September 2007
  #16
Lives for gear
 

You want to know the problem with owning a recording studio?

Joe Public wants to record an album, so he goes to Guitar Center, buys an MBox, and does it himself.

Alicia Keys wants to record an album, so she goes to Guitar Center Pro, buys an SSL AWS900, and does it herself.

Renting out a room with equipment isn't enough anymore, there has to be some sort of value-add in the way of skills. Nobody wants to pay for a room, but they'll gladly pay for a room if Timbaland comes with it. The days of paying a rate for a room are over, but the days of paying a rate for a person are still here.
Old 11th September 2007
  #17
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

My father was a pro advertising photographer through the '70's, was independent and had huge clients; Sony, Mazda, Honda, etc. Most of his stuff was full-page magazine ads, billboards, etc. Back then, he would charge maybe $2,000-$6,000 for a shoot, the higher end being a 1 week shoot. One of his big shoots was for a Mazda car driving down PCH with an overhead view showing the car/curvy road rocks/beach and waves. It was one of those inside front cover fold outs (magazines). That shoot took a week to do and he charge about $5,000 I think. He was one of the top 3 advertising photographers in LA at the time, so he got top dollar.

That exact same shoot today would probably bring $100,000 to the photographer.

I tried photography as a kid (of course), and actually did some nice photos...yet it was truly boring to me (unfortunate again).

It would be much easier if my Father was a recording engineer instead.....then at least I could blame everything on him. But he did make me a true Beatles lover....so I guess I can blame that as the start of my music-as-a-living venture.
Old 11th September 2007
  #18
Lives for gear
 
jindrich's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by max cooper View Post
$20k? A Profoto 2400 is $5500 just for the pack. And you need a few. Don't get me started on HMIs. Thank god for rentals.

Editorial rate for photographers has always been a few hundred plus per page rate of a few hundred. It's how I started and is barely worth doing except for the credit/tearsheet but it has to be a good pic/decent layout. After a couple of years I was getting around $5500 for a shoot day for ads/album covers. Mind you, that's a shoot day. Not like every day is a shoot day and there's lots of prep/wrap days. If you spend more than a couple years getting $500/shoot day you're either independently wealthy or crashing on someone's couch (I've seen both quite a bit.)
but then a Bowens 3000 pack with 2 heads is just $4,000...

Anyway, let me put it this way. With around $10k of gear these days you can edit+fx uncompressed HD video (High-End Broadcast) with an Apple rig, or buy all the tools you need to shoot CEOs in their offices or do fashion portraits of Star Wannabes (or real ones, your call).

You are offering a TOP CLASS product with a modest investment.


To offer a similar PRO product in Audio you need, assuming you're a competent engineer already, at least $50k in gear for the usuals (PT rig, some mics, outboard, monitoring, cablings...and whatnot.) Then to legally open shop, you need -at least here in Europe- a proper place with WC, lift, emergency lights, etc. That means you cannot do it in a garage but in some proper building or converted office. There you must of course isolate a room or two to work or you'll get kicked out just because of the noise you make. You'll need another $50k if you DIY.

So you require AT LEAST $100k to start. Now what will be your rates? Don't expect to get more than $300 a day because you're still a guy in a converted office (even if you have all the gear in the world) as REAL studios are charging $400-$600 a day these days (which is ridiculously low btw).


Back again to the guys editing HD video or shooting portraits. They are making $400 (or much more) a day and enjoying it. And they don't have to deal with drunk punks or rappers with guns (not that all rappers wear guns), but with agencies and corporate clients.


That was my point. Prices of gear and state of the business.
Old 11th September 2007
  #19
Lives for gear
 
John Moran's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by max cooper View Post
You should worry when gear prices go down, not up.
hmmm, three ssl 9000J went for 90-115K at auction today. add in the auctioneers spifs and other expenses too, don't stint yourself, mark those suckers up.

and those J consoles new were how much and how long ago was that ?

a 3348 sold for $500 and a euphonix C3000 sold for $3750 today. i think most any decent professional could made a decent record on that rig. hell, give them 200%markup on that pair for the used retail market and that's still silly cheap. new they were, uh.... hmm.... yikes

of course, every modern and current digital workstation bit of hardware holds value easily as well as everything else in the computer world.

"What, me worry?" - Alfred E. Neuman
Old 11th September 2007
  #20
Gear Maniac
 
NOCCA's Avatar
 

$100K for a "Pro" product?

Unless you make me include instruments (piano mostly),

I assure you that with PT LE and under 20K of gear I could without a doubt make a product that could rival many recordings made with more "pro" set-ups.

A "Pro" recording. A "Pro" offering. Offered by a "pro"fessional. Pro has to do with the person behind the tools more than the tools.

Could I make it better with better tools (or do I mean toys...)? Perhaps.

And it is definitely more fun to play with more and better tools (toys?).

I would also hope that more competent engineers could do the same or better.
Old 11th September 2007
  #21
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
Anyway, let me put it this way. With around $10k of gear these days you can edit+fx uncompressed HD video (High-End Broadcast) with an Apple rig, or buy all the tools you need to shoot CEOs in their offices or do fashion portraits of Star Wannabes (or real ones, your call).

You are offering a TOP CLASS product with a modest investment.


To offer a similar PRO product in Audio you need, assuming you're a competent engineer already, at least $50k in gear for the usuals (PT rig, some mics, outboard, monitoring, cablings...and whatnot.) ........
Oh I dunno. Most of the pro-product we produce is due to our engineering skills/talent, not the equipment. It's quite difficult to tell what a good recording has been recorded with, if the engineer is good. OTOH, you can see a cheap/low-budget video shoot from miles away. It's a lot easier to fool the ears than the eyes. Consumers can easily tell the difference in HD video than HD music (ala DVD-A, etc.). Nobody's producing big budget looking movies on low budget gear. Yet it happens in music every day.

Like the other poster here mentioned, you're paying for the person these days, not the room. Not many recording studios have house 1st engineers anymore, or at least ones that aren't actually the owner of the studio
Old 11th September 2007
  #22
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Moran View Post
hmmm, three ssl 9000J went for 90-115K at auction today. add in the auctioneers spifs and other expenses too, don't stint yourself, mark those suckers up.

and those J consoles new were how much and how long ago was that ?

a 3348 sold for $500 and a euphonix C3000 sold for $3750 today. i think most any decent professional could made a decent record on that rig. hell, give them 200%markup on that pair for the used retail market and that's still silly cheap. new they were, uh.... hmm.... yikes

of course, every modern and current digital workstation bit of hardware holds value easily as well as everything else in the computer world.

"What, me worry?" - Alfred E. Neuman
With the exception of reel-to-reel analog, most of the devaluation is in digital equipment (which you listed most). It is no different in the picture/movie world.
Old 11th September 2007
  #23
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

The irony here is that high-end analog is still expensive, no matter whether you do it in a recording studio or w/panavision.
Old 11th September 2007
  #24
Lives for gear
 
Rob King's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleaman View Post

.... you're paying for the person these days, not the room. Not many recording studios have house 1st engineers anymore, or at least ones that aren't actually the owner of the studio
That pretty much sums up a lot of guys doing business. I couldn't have afforded my CM7's without my clients that is for sure.

Regarding the gear listed in the above posts...

"-Photography: a Top of the line Canon 1DmkIII or Nikon D3 digital Camera plus a Professional 24-70mm f2.8 high grade zoom lens.

-VideoPost: a complete broadcast edit suite comprised of a fully loaded 8-core MacPro, 23" screen and Final Cut Pro Studio.
.........

I can almost guarantee that my CM7's will be worth close to what I paid for them if not more Compared to any Camera or Computer gear..Hell, they already went up $2K for the pair....
Old 11th September 2007
  #25
Lives for gear
 
jindrich's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleaman View Post
Oh I dunno. Most of the pro-product we produce is due to our engineering skills/talent, not the equipment. It's quite difficult to tell what a good recording has been recorded with, if the engineer is good. OTOH, you can see a cheap/low-budget video shoot from miles away. It's a lot easier to fool the ears than the eyes. Consumers can easily tell the difference in HD video than HD music (ala DVD-A, etc.). Nobody's producing big budget looking movies on low budget gear. Yet it happens in music every day.

Like the other poster here mentioned, you're paying for the person these days, not the room. Not many recording studios have house 1st engineers anymore, or at least ones that aren't actually the owner of the studio
the tools have gone down in price in the video field too. In fact even more than in audio, and the difference is that cheap digital video tools are WAY better than analog/old digital, unlike than in music.

In Audio, theres NO SUBSTITUTE for a big, great sounding room.

BTW You'll be surprised at what those little under $10k cams can do. If fact, you've seen it already on tv in ads and news etc, but nobody told ya.

The difference in other fields is that rates are still there (even when budgets may have gone down, depending on what).
Old 11th September 2007
  #26
Lives for gear
 
Rob King's Avatar
Just to add one more opinion. Nobody should EVER charge or go in debt for a high ticket item unless it will be paying for itself. I only buy gear based on the projects I work on and the profitability vs. my cost of living. I have absolutely zero credit debt (Except for my House mortgage). You always have to be prepared for the down time.
Old 11th September 2007
  #27
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
the tools have gone down in price in the video field too. In fact even more than in audio, and the difference is that cheap digital video tools are WAY better than analog/old digital, unlike than in music.

In Audio, theres NO SUBSTITUTE for a big, great sounding room.

You'll be surprised at what those little under $10k cams can do. If fact, you've seen it already on tv in ads and news etc.

The difference in other fields is that rates are still there (even when budgets may have gone down, depending on what).
Actually, I think it's more the same here in the audio field than you say. The closest market to compare would probably be the intro of ADAT's and Mackies in the early '90's. Everyone marveled at the cheap cost of one 8trk ADAT @ $4,000 each when DASH machines were $100,000+. Now you can do much better than ADAT's in quality and features (pro-stools) for a mere fraction of the cost. Heck, an Alesis HD24 is $1500 and it does 24trks better than the ADAT (which woulda been $12,000 for 3 machines at intro).

Thing is, a $10k cam isn't gonna make the commercial for you....there is so much more involved in the cost, not to mention the amount of people and what they cost to make a commercial. I'd have to say again, the analogy of a music video budget for 1 song compared to the cost of recording the whole album for the same band. You could do it with a $10k camera (but probably not just one), yet the rest of the equipment + people involved from start to finish would put your $50k budget to shame.
Old 11th September 2007
  #28
Lives for gear
 
jindrich's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob King View Post
Just to add one more opinion. Nobody should EVER charge or go in debt for a high ticket item unless it will be paying for itself. I only buy gear based on the projects I work on and the profitability vs. my cost of living. I have absolutely zero credit debt (Except for my House mortgage). You always have to be prepared for the down time.
that's a wise advice for small engineer owned studios, but not a single big facility was built like that. They were all built on credit (like in any other industry), with solid business plans.

Problem is today it makes no sense anymore, that's why all studios are closing doors.
Old 11th September 2007
  #29
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
that's a wise advice for small engineer owned studios, but not a single big facility was built like that. They were all built on credit (like in any other industry), with solid business plans.

Problem is today it makes no sense anymore, that's why all studios are closing doors.
Yep, the one thing constant is change. Adapt or die.

Oh, and don't buy any expensive digital equipment unless your work can support it.
Old 11th September 2007
  #30
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOCCA View Post
But yet these professionals the film/video example continually are in more work and more often than not getting paid more.
That is changing very quickly. Video editing is about 3-4 years behind our curve. Watch what happens in 5 years. There will be an outcry from that community.

I was just talking with a producer who told me he was moving his post prod. to LA. (Cool I thought. I live in LA) Then he told me why..... He can get a world class (his words) video editor and Avid for $200 per day here in LA. WRF?!?!?!? Needless to say, I have not pursued that opportunity any further.
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
thenewyear / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music and Location Recording
201
DISCERN / So much gear, so little time
6
amd / The Moan Zone
30
lordmiguel / High end
28
djui5 / Gear free zone - shoot the breeze
2

Forum Jump
Forum Jump