The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Gear Prices and State of the Business Condenser Microphones
Old 12th September 2007
  #61
Lives for gear
 
John Moran's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleaman View Post
With the exception of reel-to-reel analog, most of the devaluation is in digital equipment (which you listed most). It is no different in the picture/movie world.
the ssl consoles are analog and they took the big hit of >75% depreciation in 5-7 years. i used to tell people that having a big console was a scary proposition, even as i owned several. $600K+ consoles on 5 years schedule with the $100K residual = $100K/year = $8300/month =$2000/week and that's just the console sitting in the rain in your parking lot. oh, you'd like someplace to put it so you could actually do some work ? minor detail, that costs more.... Even on a 7 year schedule it's $1500/week depreciation, sitting in the parking lot, in the rain. forget what the accountant says, this is real world valuations of what you can sell the thing for to someone else.

someone said it's not about the gear anymore, it's about the person, and they are correct. any monkey can buy equipment. owning a formula one race car doesn't make you mario andretti.

i wrote off all digital gear in my last line, that stuff holds no value even if it's working perfectly. i've sold off and replaced more perfectly working digi equipment than i care to think about!

fundamentally, these are tools no matter how swoopy and sleek they may look. the difficulty for many people is to treat them like that and not fall in love with them. hell, i love cool equipment and have spent millions of dollars on it over the years building multiple studios. in the end, they are just tools and few tools hold their value in any trade or business.
Old 13th September 2007
  #62
Lives for gear
 
max cooper's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
Im not quite sure how much gear the photographer has in his studio, but I'd hazard a guess it's not beyond $15-$20k. That's about what my other friend, the SSL studio owner, has in guitars alone.
But you're comparing a photographer with a studio owner. That's apples and oranges.

If you compare a photo studio owner with a recording studio owner, you'll get in the ballpark.
Old 13th September 2007
  #63
Lives for gear
 
cjogo's Avatar
My day job , for over 25 years, has been photography.....very lucrative --for a small investment ( $5k) ~~
one can easily average $500 per hour .

This particular recording studio has had the doors open for 19 years --higher investment (3X) ( we buy used ~ when possible ) and we can barely eek out $ 100 per hour ..

In my spare time ::: I perform with a band >> which each performer artist can expect $-500 a night each --with very little expenditure of $ but , years of experience behind the instrument. .YouTube - WHITER SHADE OF PALE


it's has to BE >> more for the love of the art > ... .

The DIGITAL world is rapidly change the commerce side > of all the business I am active in. Photography & music have completely went a different way ...
Old 14th September 2007
  #64
Gear Guru
 
u b k's Avatar
 

where did this rule come from anyway, that you can't compare apples to oranges? don't know about you but i can compare them pretty handily.

for starters, they're different colors.

apples tend to be sweeter, oranges can be sweet but they're generally tart as well. granny smiths are the notable exception here.

apples produce a juice that ferments quite nicely; orange juice just gets more acidic and nasty with time until, eventually, it becomes something we call 'tropicana.'

i could go on, but i think my point has been made.


gregoire
del
ubk
.
Old 14th September 2007
  #65
Lives for gear
 
cjogo's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by u b k View Post
where did this rule come from anyway, that you can't compare apples to oranges? don't know about you but i can compare them pretty handily.

for starters, they're different colors.

apples tend to be sweeter, oranges can be sweet but they're generally tart as well. granny smiths are the notable exception here.

apples produce a juice that ferments quite nicely; orange juice just gets more acidic and nasty with time until, eventually, it becomes something we call 'tropicana.'

i could go on, but i think my point has been made.


gregoire
del
ubk
.
APPLES = ANALOG ..................... ORANGES = DIGITAL


Damm nothing rhythms with Orange
Old 14th September 2007
  #66
Lives for gear
 
Alécio Costa's Avatar
 

Frankly, this is one of the TOP5 topics of all time.

I would like to add to this discussion:
a)the importance of music in people´s life today and 25 years ago, for example.

I am from a time where we had a tremendous pleasure to go to a store, but the latest Rock/Pop albums from Van halen, Toto, Duran Duran, Asia, Yes, Rush.

We would read the lyrics, eager to go to the shows, play the stuff on parties.

We would borrow albums from friends, sometimes record Chrome k7s...

Most people of the youngest generation rarely buy a CD, neither care about who played or how and where was it played, if there are cool pictures n the CD art. Even MTV has lost its focus. Everything shall be on Youtube/Myspace.

People would sit, relax and listen to their discs. and Today?


b)Recently I had the opportunity to return to the "what market calls cutting edge": aA Pro Tools HD Accel PCI-e system with a MAc Pro and 192.
I still have half of my older system, a Mix Plus. I would certainly be able to continue working with this system for more 3 or even 5 years. It runs exactly s day 1 on a very stable G4/Adat Bridge system.

Was it really necessary to do, based on my $$$ return? Not really. So what is the point? New gear, motivation to keep working, try different techniques, approaches and mostly, love for profession.

What differs us from kids is the price of our toys.


c) Alesis, Mackie, Behringer - Chinese Industry

Thanks to Alesis and Mackie, the studio market reached the real democratization status. Morelçater, we had Behringer and of course, some Daw developers, like Digidesign and the 001.

I started my studio in 1996 and circa 2000 we started feeling the effects of the bedroom studio neighbors, recording with digi 001, sometimes with cracked copies of Cakewalk/Sonar, etc.

Last edited by Alécio Costa; 14th September 2007 at 02:01 PM.. Reason: mistyped
Old 14th September 2007
  #67
Gear Maniac
 
nemisis633's Avatar
 

One thing I've certainly started to realize is never buy gear for appeal anymore, only buy it if its going to make things easier on yourself or It's going to make you more happy with your work. People are not willing to pay extra for better equipment from the room they're working in. Sure they love to have the staples, but add 10k in new gear and I bet clients won't be willing to pay your more.

The most frustrating thing though, is cutting someone a deal at like $300 per day, (with attempted cost negotiations to bring your price down further) and then without blinking an eye they call a rental house and spend $300 a day to rent 2 compressors.

You get $300 for your 100k+ of gear for the day.. rental house gets $300 for $5k investment.

How does this make sense?

Lets say you spend the $5k to add the most rented gear to your room. Will you get an extra $300 a day? $150, $10????

I think not..
Old 14th September 2007
  #68
member no 666
 
Fletcher's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjogo View Post
APPLES = ANALOG ..................... ORANGES = DIGITAL

Uhhhhhh..... I think Apple = Digital [Logic 8] while Orange = Guitar Amps.

I would say you can't really compare the two.

As always, YMMV.
Old 14th September 2007
  #69
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alécio Costa View Post
Frankly, this is one of the TOP5 topics of all time.

I would like to add to this discussion:
a)the importance of music in people´s life today and 25 years ago, for example.

I am from a time where we had a tremendous pleasure to go to a store, but the latest Rock/Pop albums from Van halen, Toto, Duran Duran, Asia, Yes, Rush.

We would read the lyrics, eager to go to the shows, play the stuff on parties.

We would borrow albums from friends, sometimes record Chrome k7s...

Most people of the youngest generation rarely buy a CD, neither care about who played or how and where was it played, if there are cool pictures n the CD art. Even MTV has lost its focus. Everything shall be on Youtube/Myspace.

People would sit, relax and listen to their discs. and Today?

I'm sure it ties in with the recording studio situation, but your observations about the demise of the physical product is something I've noticed as well. The liner notes, the artwork, it all used to matter. Where is the spot for those on an iTunes digital download? And just as a little aside, where do you think the engineering credits are going to end up on an iTunes download?
Old 14th September 2007
  #70
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

Here's the thing:

I can live without good photography in my life.

I can Not live without good music in my life.

What would I rather be part of?

According to my bank account, it's music.
Old 14th September 2007
  #71
Lives for gear
 
jindrich's Avatar
 

This thread is NOT about expensive Gear, Photography or Video, but about the PATHETIC ROI (Return of Investment) of the Studio Business -which isn't a business anymore- in comparison to every other single Biz in the Entertaiment Industry.

As shown, you can make a living doing Pro work and offering Pro results investing as low as $6.5k in other artistic fields. And resulting rates are even higher out there. With such a low investment ($6.5k) you can shoot a documentary for the Discovery Channel HD, edit videos with special Fx for the MTV or photograph celebrities for the cover of Vanity Fair.
What do $6.6k give you in the Studio Biz? Can you get results good enough for the MTV with that amount in gear? You can hardly buy a properly soundproofed studio door for that $.


The questions are, Why did that happend -and not to the other bizs? and, Is there a cure for this? I'm afraid the answer is no.


What sense does it make then to keep on throwing $ to a dead biz (if it's your primary way of income)?

Consider that in consumer economics any product is a depreciable commodity, and that you invest IN THE BUSINESS, the equipment being JUST a capital expense.

I know this is such an heresy here in GS -and i've been trapped by that too- but i'm also an economist.

No professional studio can afford the prices of current equipment anymore. Fortunately for gear manufacturers, amateurs and owners of home studios will keep their business afloat as they'll hold on buying a few $6k+ pieces to give them peace of mind ("I'm PRO now"). The real "pros" are running thru the back door though, closing all facilities.



The ONLY way to make a Biz out of this is becoming a famous producer/engineer with platinum on the walls.

YOU become the reason. The gear is dead, as much as the studio business.


Go back to your studio and make a HIT (which means doing commercial music, a la Fergie. My Humps, my humps my humps).


Dont flame me, I'm only the messenger.

(funnily enough, if you're a gearhead the best way to afford gear is by NOT becoming an AE but a video editor or photographer instead).
Old 14th September 2007
  #72
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
What sense does it make then to keep on throwing $ to a dead biz (if it's your primary way of income)?

---------

YOU become the reason. The gear is dead, as much as the studio business.

.
It's already established that it doesn't make sense, we're beating a dead horse here.

If it were as easy as just buying GEAR to make it, well then, everyone, not just engineers/musicians, would get in it.

It has always been about YOU to some degree (there are always exceptions of course). Even dumping $2mil into a studio opening back in 1988 didn't guarantee a successful business. Yeah you would get some business, but enough to turn a profit? Back in the good 'ol days (if you will) of this business many of these studios were in an arms race, continually upgrading to beat the other guys with gear, etc. This was probably one of the main reasons many of these studios failed, they built and grew with gear at their max credit ability barely staying in the black, but with no safety net for the storm. The storm came and many couldn't survive even beyond a year.

Buying gear as a primary business plan will doom you, then and now.
Old 14th September 2007
  #73
Lives for gear
 
cjogo's Avatar
If the equipment we rely on > day in , day out ~ works...We simply do not need to purchase any new gear --

It's just good business practice :: we try to keep our overhead down --and keep our prices comfortable for the clients. It's generally the client, that request something not in our the arsenal ....they can rent ~ all they please. heh
Old 14th September 2007
  #74
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cjogo View Post
If the equipment we rely on > day in , day out ~ works...We simply do not need to purchase any new gear --

It's just good business practice :: we try to keep our overhead down --and keep our prices comfortable for the clients. It's generally the client, that request something not in our the arsenal ....they can rent ~ all they please. heh
Yep. Even at Sunset Sound here in Hollywood you had to rent Pro-Tools as late as 3 years ago.
Old 14th September 2007
  #75
Lives for gear
 

I just say buy used gear since you'll find it for about 1/2 price give or take a few bucks. Its amazing how many musicians and engineers are eager to part with gear to pay rent. When in doubt, check out The Recycler in L.A.
Old 14th September 2007
  #76
Lives for gear
 
cjogo's Avatar
Well we still buy good used gear ~ within reason --now with effects under $200, etc...
Old 15th September 2007
  #77
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
This thread is NOT about expensive Gear, Photography or Video, but about the PATHETIC ROI (Return of Investment) of the Studio Business -which isn't a business anymore- in comparison to every other single Biz in the Entertaiment Industry.
You are 100% right about that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
As shown, you can make a living doing Pro work and offering Pro results investing as low as $6.5k in other artistic fields. And resulting rates are even higher out there. With such a low investment ($6.5k) you can shoot a documentary for the Discovery Channel HD, edit videos with special Fx for the MTV or photograph celebrities for the cover of Vanity Fair.
What do $6.6k give you in the Studio Biz? Can you get results good enough for the MTV with that amount in gear? You can hardly buy a properly soundproofed studio door for that $.
Hey, I can do you one better than that. For the cost of a bicycle and getting up early enough to ride down to Home Depot and stand with the other illegals, you can easily make $100 per day CASH with $0 investment. If you have a decent skill level and can speak english, make that $150. What percentage of studio owners on this board consistantly make $150 per day. All the threads I see about "how much should I charge" are talking about $10-18 per hour. That's less than unskilled labor. Heck, even a plumber or handiman makes more than 90% of all studios. And to boot, most of them stay pretty darn busy.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
The questions are, Why did that happend -and not to the other bizs? and, Is there a cure for this? I'm afraid the answer is no.
The reason for the first is quite complicated but has to do with offshore manufacturing, MTV, thousands of schools prepping grads for positions that don't exist, the "Rock Star" factor, and technology advances. The second question is easy. There is no cure. Pandora is out of the box and not going back in. "Traditional" careers as we have come to know them no longer exist for the most part. You have to create your own niche. Having 20 years of experience helps, since we are reverting to a talent/experience based paradigm, but it still is no guarantee by a long shot.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
What sense does it make then to keep on throwing $ to a dead biz (if it's your primary way of income)?
None. Zero.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
No professional studio can afford the prices of current equipment anymore. Fortunately for gear manufacturers, amateurs and owners of home studios will keep their business afloat as they'll hold on buying a few $6k+ pieces to give them peace of mind ("I'm PRO now"). The real "pros" are running thru the back door though, closing all facilities.
There are no real "pro" studios opening up anymore. Those businesses are run by businessmen with real CFO's and accountants and bankers that won't let them do anything as stupid as opening up a biz that will surely fail under the load of expectation of gear they need, but the lack of paying business that they will receive. The only real studio concerns I see opening these days are what I call "vanity" studios. Capitolized by people with more money than they know what to do with. They just want to be in "the biz" same as you or me, but they have the $$$ to actually pull it off from scratch. They're not making money though. Maybe they need a good tax writeoff.



Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
The ONLY way to make a Biz out of this is becoming a famous producer/engineer with platinum on the walls.
Yes. And pray tell.....how do we do that again??? heh


Quote:
Originally Posted by jindrich View Post
(funnily enough, if you're a gearhead the best way to afford gear is by NOT becoming an AE but a video editor or photographer instead).

Sorry, I have to disagree with you on that. Video editors are already on the decline due to the same factors that have driven us down. They're just a few years behind us. If Photography becomes as popular as being an AE, they will be faced with the same situation. Best bet - Plumber, Electrician, etc. Always needed, well paid, can always call and look for work without feeling "sheepish", and not a big capitol outlay.
Old 15th September 2007
  #78
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

How do you make $1 million in the recording studio business?

Start with $2 million, spend $1 million on the studio and keep the other million.

As funny as this sounds (yes, it is a joke), many venture capital wall street start up's work on this principle. As long as you still have investment income coming in, you can make a good salary.

Problem is, even Venture Capitalists aren't stupid enough to invest in a recording studio start up.

Old 15th September 2007
  #79
Lives for gear
 
cjogo's Avatar
I don't buy the "latest~greatest" in my photographic business & certainly not with the music side ....Business before slutzing
If I can shoot a film camera > for a considerable amount less < than the latest digital --it's not the technology
Old 15th September 2007
  #80
Lives for gear
 
John Moran's Avatar
 

I miss Frank

"don't you know you can make more money as a butcher"

-Frank Zappa-
Old 15th September 2007
  #81
Lives for gear
 
cjogo's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Moran View Post
"don't you know you can make more money as a butcher"

-Frank Zappa-

That's what happen to all the "razor editors" > from the tape days < ended up becoming butchers....
Old 15th September 2007
  #82
Lives for gear
 
midnightsun's Avatar
 

These are true words of wisdom

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob King View Post
Just to add one more opinion. Nobody should EVER charge or go in debt for a high ticket item unless it will be paying for itself. I only buy gear based on the projects I work on and the profitability vs. my cost of living. I have absolutely zero credit debt (Except for my House mortgage). You always have to be prepared for the down time.
There are only two types of debt-- good debt and bad debt. The majority of debt that Americans have is bad debt. The majority of Americans have unwittingly fallen into malignant debt. The yearly interest people are paying for rapidly depreciating assets is insane. The winners in this whole game are the people earning the interest. The losers are those who have bellied up to the consumer trough on borrowed money. We are let to believe that we have "got to have it." The advertisers are slick at teaching the masses that life will be so grand and full if only we had such and such. I wonder how many people on this forum have had their creativity crushed because they are stressing over debt.

The debt challenge-- if a person needs to go in debt for more than a month or two to buy something more than 5000 dollars, instead pay several hundred dollars cash and visit an accountant and see if the plan makes sense. The accountant will say he/she doesn't understand and needs a pro forma to make sense of the dream. If the person can't come up with the pro forma, the the plan should be chalked up to wishful thinking. Many people won't seek counsel prior to debt because it is like asking our parents permission buy a new toy.

On the other hand if a person just wants to spend 5000 or 50,000 dollars for the fun of it, and can afford it that is a different story.
Old 15th September 2007
  #83
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleaman View Post
Then look at the film equivalent: Actor doesn't pay for any of the production, write any of the lines or even come up with the character. They get a huge paycheck for that one day + residuals for every time it gets played! And the actor gets paid whether the show airs or not.

And for the final dagger in the heart: Anyone could be thrust into fame/fortune in the acting profession w/o ANY previous experience. This can NOT be done with music.
Your argument makes sense except you are missing one major point. I live in LA where everyone is a struggling actor. Most actors I know, that look the part and have talent, cannot get a job no matter how hard they try, there are too many actors and not enough acting gigs for even 1% of them to work. They go on endless auditions and maybe land 1 or 2 commercials a year. They can't make their own movies and have to battle it out with the other unemployed actors to work for free on some horrible student film.

A singer, writer, musician, composer has just as tough a job at making a living, but at least they can make their own pro sounding product for very cheap and put it on their website and itunes. With logic, mac, apogee ensemble or duet, and a few mics, guitar, bass, keyboard, you can make a decent sounding pro record or soundtrack. If you don't play yourself, there is an endless supply of decent to great musicians for either free or stupid cheap. The one tricky area is live drums, which many styles of music can live without, but here in LA, you can get a world class drummer for $500-$1000 for the day and cut your drums at a world class studio for another $500-700.
(I have a tv composer friend who makes over $500,000 a year using the above mentioned gear which he has less than $10,000 invested in, all in his untreated bedroom. Another big time pop/R&B producer I work with does 90% of his work in his bedroom (with just sonex on the walls) on a $25,000 rig(protools HD, M149, tubetech comp, manley pre, genelecs) and his product is always world class.)

I would much rather be an artist today, with the ability to make my own product for cheap and own my own setup, than 20 years ago when you had to spend $50,000+ to make one pro record. Less than 1% of all singers and musicians ever make it but at least everyone can now make their own pro product if they put some effort into learning how to do it themselves.

I do agree that the studio business and music engineering have been hit exceptionally hard and most will not survive, and those of us that love gear, engineering and studios will be doing it for other reasons than making money. Big music studios will mostly be owned by successfull writers, producers, composers, or hobbies for wealthy people.
Old 15th September 2007
  #84
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

I think you might have missed the point that it is just the same if not worse for a musician (I think much worse).

You agree that less than 1% (actually MUCH less than 1%) of musicians ever make it, yet the musician standards for making it account for barely recouping record making expenses (some will argue getting the 1st advance is making it).

The acting standards for making it account to 6 figure + incomes with no expenses for the project they worked on, maybe only a few days of working for said project and only giving maybe 10% to the agent (+ some union dues). Lets not forget the catering...Mmmmm.
All the free readings/looking for work is trumped by musician’s expenses of gear+gear+rehearsal/studio space+tons of free shows/promotions, paying for demos (more gear usually). This is all before they get the privilege of paying for their record contract through the recording/producer/manager/lawyer expenses, then take out video expenses...what's left of that 10% record sales (which there are none these days), you split between your other 3-4 band members, pay taxes, then go buy a happy meal.

And sound for picture stuff doesn't count. There's good money to be made in that dept, in fact, probably the only area to make money with music these days, but it isn't easy to get into either.....just try it yourself.

Even DJ's make more $$ than musicians. Of my actor friends, musician friends, Dj friends only the musicians are broke (and always have been). I know way more musicians than actors and dj's, yet I know at least 6+ actors who've made 6 figure incomes each, probably 5 dj's that make $50k+ or more a year and many more that live off just dj'ing. Funny story> I dj friend of mine was all excited a few years ago when he got into a band as a dj (ala portishead, etc.). I said he wouldn't last a month. After a month of rehearsals and gigs lugging his equipment around for no $$$ (which he knew), he gave up and went back to his paying dj gigs.

If there is one artist that doesn't get respect these days it's musicians by far. Dj's are rock stars, rappers are rock stars, actors, pop artists, etc. Heck everyone is criticizing Brittany for out of sync lip-syncing...NOT because she was lip-syncing, but that it was out of sync. This is what it has come to.
Old 15th September 2007
  #85
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleaman View Post
How do you make $1 million in the recording studio business?

Start with $2 million, spend $1 million on the studio and keep the other million.
Thats goddamn hysterical! Unfortunately it's largely true.
Old 15th September 2007
  #86
Lives for gear
 
cjogo's Avatar
As with any business (ad)venture--there should be a {$} plan ..a mission statement.

Find your market before the investment.......we operate every day without even a PC/Mac running in the background. One can purchase "older" technology and have no problem operating in the black thumbsup> if you have the client base.
Old 15th September 2007
  #87
Gear Maniac
 
NOCCA's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleaman View Post
How do you make $1 million in the recording studio business?

Start with $2 million, spend $1 million on the studio and keep the other million.
I always though it was start with $3 million...
Old 15th September 2007
  #88
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Yeah, that's the way I heard it too. These daysm it should probably be revised to:

"How to make a million in the recording studio business? Start with FOUR million." heh
Old 15th September 2007
  #89
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleaman View Post
I think you might have missed the point that it is just the same if not worse for a musician (I think much worse).
I think there are more than enough struggling actors and musicians/singers/artists and neither has a chance in hell these days to make any money. The point is a musician/singer can at least artistically fulfill their vision by making their own pro album in their bedroom and distribute it on the internet/itunes(not possible a few short years ago) and they can play their music live. Most struggling actors never get to make use of, or share their talent. I'd rather be a struggling musician than a struggling actor anyday.

I do agree that once you make it, an actor has it better and will make more money on average. But, I think there are far fewer jobs for actors than musicians and your chance of making it as an actor are much lower than making it at least to a livable income as a musician(every major city in the US has a local scene where there are at least a couple of original bands that can make a decent living doing live shows not to mention bar bands, dance bands, wedding bands.) Actors have to fight their way into jobs on a couple of movies released every week and a few dozen tv shows which mostly reuse the same stars leaving very few openings for new talent.
Old 16th September 2007
  #90
Lives for gear
 
Fleaman's Avatar
 

In the big cities bands don't make $$ from their shows. Maybe a small country club with a cover band, but not many of those in the big cities.

I know Soooo many struggling actors and at least 50% of them have had some good gigs at some point, commercial spot here, voice over there, etc. There is a LOT of work out there for actors and anyone can be an actor...any age, size, etc., they need them all. Yeah there's immense competition, but it's no different than bands/musicians. Actors also don't need to rehearse or write screenplays like musicians do. We write and create the whole song, the actors just read someone else's lines (yes, I'm simplifying). They might rehearse and practice for a part, they might take acting lessons and get tutored, but in whole, they don't have to put nearly as much time learning to be an Actor as a person does to become a musician. And even talented musicians still have to spend a lot of time rehearsing new songs or even old songs.

In fact, practically every musician that I know who was also an actor has made more $$$ acting than playing music.

As hard as it is to be successful as an actor, the bottom line is it's a multi-hundred billion dollar industry...there's a lot of $$ going around and a lot of jobs for actors. Problem is, like anything, there are a lot more actors than jobs.

I think Nickelback was the only Rock act that went multi-platinum this year (or last?).
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
thenewyear / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music and Location Recording
201
DISCERN / So much gear, so little time
6
amd / The Moan Zone
30
lordmiguel / High end
28
djui5 / Gear free zone - shoot the breeze
2

Forum Jump
Forum Jump