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How To Get A Song Placement On A Major Label Album? Virtual Instrument Plugins
Old 5th September 2007
  #1
Gear Maniac
 

How To Get A Song Placement On A Major Label Album?

Not sure what forum this should be in but this one seems to offer the most advice.

So I know people here have had success with placements on majors.

If anybody would like to share their stories, I think it would benefit a lot of people here.

Is the best approach to go through a publisher or go straight to the label?

Would it be good to send a demo to a label but state you're a songwriter and not looking to get signed yourself?

Shortly I'm going to be putting these theories to the test as I try to get one of my songs placed.

Thanks,

Chris
Old 5th September 2007
  #2
member no 666
 
Fletcher's Avatar
Having a couple of great songs won't suck either.

The stuff I've placed has generally been done with a phone call to the band management so it's not "unsolicited material"... then if they like it hash out a deal [make sure you have your entertainment attorney in on the process].
Old 5th September 2007
  #3
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletcher View Post
Having a couple of great songs won't suck either.

The stuff I've placed has generally been done with a phone call to the band management so it's not "unsolicited material"... then if they like it hash out a deal [make sure you have your entertainment attorney in on the process].
Yeah what does this unsolicited material mean?

Its to do with copyright purposes yes. So by passing it through somebody you know at the label or what not makes it solicited.

Only trouble is, what if you've not got the opportunity to get friends with anybody at a label or have any contacts for a band/artist?

You just want the label to hear what you can do and see if they have any openings for you or could push one of your songs to one of their artists?

Also what if you dont have an entertainment attorney or what would be a solicitor in this country?
Old 5th September 2007
  #4
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lowfreq33's Avatar
 

You need a publisher. Barring that an entertainment lawyer can sometimes get your material through the door. You might also consider joining TAXI. I don't have any experience with them myself, but I've heard they do actually get a lot of placements.

Unsolicited material means you sent your songs to them without any prior contact. Basically you're being a telemarketer. The problem isn't so much copyright (although that is a factor) as it is the sheer volume of material these guys would have to sift through if they accepted everything people tried to send them.
Old 5th September 2007
  #5
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lowfreq33 View Post
You need a publisher. Barring that an entertainment lawyer can sometimes get your material through the door. You might also consider joining TAXI. I don't have any experience with them myself, but I've heard they do actually get a lot of placements.

Unsolicited material means you sent your songs to them without any prior contact. Basically you're being a telemarketer. The problem isn't so much copyright (although that is a factor) as it is the sheer volume of material these guys would have to sift through if they accepted everything people tried to send them.
I only really have a brief idea of what a publisher is.

Somebody you sign a deal with who takes a cut and can push your songs through their contacts?

I'm young so I don't have a solicitor but I could arrange a meeting with our family one and see if he has any suggestions.

I've heard a lot of bad reports about set ups like TAXI, suggesting they're just out to get your money and probably wont get you a placement.
Old 5th September 2007
  #6
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tempest19 View Post
I only really have a brief idea of what a publisher is.

Somebody you sign a deal with who takes a cut and can push your songs through their contacts?

I'm young so I don't have a solicitor but I could arrange a meeting with our family one and see if he has any suggestions.

I've heard a lot of bad reports about set ups like TAXI, suggesting they're just out to get your money and probably wont get you a placement.
No your family solicitor is not going to be of any assistance to you!! Big mistake!

Read here to learn a few things about the music biz (like what a publisher is): StarPolish Artist Advice: The Best, Most Comprehensive Artist and Musician Career Advice

Taxi gets solicited for lots of placements. They will forward your songs if they're actually good. The rest is up to the stars aligning. What is stopping you from making the connections you lack? Be advised, the majority of Taxi's opportunities are for film/tv placements, not for major label artists looking for songs.
Old 5th September 2007
  #7
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doug_hti's Avatar
 

in todays industry, hands down the BEST (mostly only) way to get cut after cut is to have a VERY close relationship with the artist/bands and their inner circle (manager, A&R, producers). The only other exception is if you are at the top of your game (for the 10 minute go around) at this particular point in time where you have people approaching you for songs. This is usually the producer/track guy/songwriter.

For pure (non producer type) songwriters, ones that have had and have MAJOR publishing deals and major acccomplishments....it has become extremely difficult to get a cut. And don't think for a minute that your publisher will get you cuts, they make it easier in other ways, most songs are plugged by the writers themselves. And don't think for a minute that a fantastic song will cut because it's a fantastic song. There are so many amazing songs sitting uncut.

Solicited and unsolicited has more to do with there being a direct connection between you and the person/company that you are "soliciting" material to. Unsolicited means that your material did not come "in the door" through a known (welcomed) channel....in other words, it was not requested or known about by the company in any way shape or form. Most major companies have rules against their staff accepting and listening to unsolicited material to protect themselves from lawsuits of folks making bogus claims that so and so copied their song or other intellectual property.

For something to be given to the company through proper channels, you have to have a direct or indirect relationship with the company or someone or something that establishes immediate credibility...That being said, my wife got her first publishing deal with BMG by sending in an "unsolicited" demo back in 1992....even when they had policies against unsolicited material.
Old 5th September 2007
  #8
Gear Maniac
 

Hmm theres so many different approaches to take I'm going to have to do my homework big time.

Knowing somebody at the label or knowing the artist/manager/producer is quite out of the question for my situation.

I live in a small town in the North of England. I'd have to be in London to make those kind of connections. Also using a publisher outside of England might be an option.

You suggested, if you're at the top of your game and people are approaching you for songs, this would be great too but if only your close friends and family have heard your music and a few possible others but nobody in the industry this also isn't possible.

How about taking your best song to a radio station and waiting around so they hopefully play it. A guy recently did this at Radio 1 and some Universal reps came down to sign him. Would this work from a songwriters perspective?

Whatever the approach, it's something I'll have to persue and make a start in otherwise I'll never get anywhere.
Old 5th September 2007
  #9
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nadumr View Post
No your family solicitor is not going to be of any assistance to you!! Big mistake!

Read here to learn a few things about the music biz (like what a publisher is): StarPolish Artist Advice: The Best, Most Comprehensive Artist and Musician Career Advice

Taxi gets solicited for lots of placements. They will forward your songs if they're actually good. The rest is up to the stars aligning. What is stopping you from making the connections you lack? Be advised, the majority of Taxi's opportunities are for film/tv placements, not for major label artists looking for songs.
Firstly I never thought for one second this would be easy.

I live far out from any of the action so its near impossible to make those connections.

If I lived central London I still wouldn't have a clue how to go about it.

If I want a job in admin at a sheet metal factory, I'd look in the newspaper or online and see what jobs are available, phone up arrange an interview and see what happens from there.

How can you contact somebody at BMG publishing, just phone them up and tell them your situation?

Also thanks for the link, it's going to be very good reading
Old 6th September 2007
  #10
Lives for gear
I've had cuts and it ain't easy...Right now the answer seems to be to write it with the artist or producer. Wish I knew...
Old 6th September 2007
  #11
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jmikeperkins's Avatar
For the most part, its an insiders game and you would have to know someone involved in the project. Of course your song needs to be great, but beyond that, the problem is that if you have no track record its almost impossible to get any sort of decision maker to even listen to your song. Its very hard to get an established publisher to listen to your stuff as well, much less represent you.

If by hard work or luck you somehow get to a point where a major might actually want to use one of your songs, then they will want most of the publishing money and you will make very little from the placement of your song. The theory being that you will galdly sell your soul to Satan to get your song placed with a major and you should feel lucky that you are NOT PAYING THEM to record your song and release it. You might get the CD and realize they stuck the artist or producers name as a "co-writer" without your knowledge or agreement even when this "co-writer" did no writing at all. This has been going on since at least the mid 1950's when Col. Tom Parker stuck Elvis' name on Heartbreak Hotel as a co-writer and then demanded at least 1/2 of the publishing for any song Elvis recorded thereafter. I have a video of a press conference with Elvis in the mid 1970's when someone asked him why it was so hard to get songs to him for his consideration and why his management wanted 1/2 of the publishing for anything Elvis recorded. He does not have a good answer to the question and appears VERY uncomfortable at being asked about that. There are a number of examples of songs Elvis wanted to record, like Dolly Parton's "I Will Always Love You" but he was not allowed to record it by Col. Parker because Dolly would not give up 1/2 of the publishing (see the Mix Magazine Classic Tracks article on that song).

I love music and I love songwriting, but large parts of this business SUCK.

J. Mike Perkins
jmikeperkins.com myspace.com/jmikeperkins
Old 6th September 2007
  #12
Gear Addict
 

Nah, they don't suck really, because it's the same in any other game. It's a form of a self protection mechanism (albeit an indiscriminate one). Which is basically the same as any other industry's self protection, eg. nobody is going to let me run a fortune 500 next week. What with garageband etc. and the tools being so readily available, there has to be something or the whole thing implodes. It isn't perfect but then lots of things aren't in lots of industries.
Why should the decision maker take a song from x when he could take one from y that's delivered four or five already and has a track record? Why would the owner of restaurant take meat from supplier A when supplier B has already provided the meat that's got him a michelin star or two??? It'd be churlish to think they'd simply go on gut instinct, because it's about as accurate as predicting the weather and the guy doesn't want to lose his job for sucky calls.
You can say 'oh, if he tastes it and finds out it's much much better" but that's exactly, it he a) has to taste it (so find a way onto the inside, through social means) AND b) be much, much better than the original. Only a little better won't do. And c) the guy has to have the intelligence to know which is better, which often isn't the case.
It's a bitch but it's like any other industry, it's only because it's so creative, subjective and personal we have different expectations of what business should be like.
Old 6th September 2007
  #13
Lives for gear
 
lowfreq33's Avatar
 

Get Everything you need to know about the music business by Donald Passman.
Probably the most helpful book I've ever read when it comes to how the music business breaks down.
Old 6th September 2007
  #14
Gear Guru
 
u b k's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tempest19 View Post
Knowing somebody at the label or knowing the artist/manager/producer is quite out of the question for my situation.


then placing a song with a major is pretty much out of the question for your situation.

if you haven't gotten it from everyone else who's hammered it home, i'll say it a little differently: what you are seeking has almost nothing to do with talent or quality of product, and everything to do with relationships and assistance from other humans who are in a position to help you. if talent were the key to success, the world would look VERY different. but look at every successful person and you will see that persistence is the key, and community is the vehicle.

this is how it is in 99.99% of all human endeavors, the major label game is no exception. getting things done requires collective effort, which requires favors, which requires relationships.

if you truly believe you need to move to central london to make the kinds of connections we're talking about (and i'm not convinced that's the truth), then your next step is to pack your belongings and move to central london. how much are you willing to risk for this dream? when you ask the universe for something big, you gotta show it you're willing to do big things in return. in this case, you *have* to network, you have to establish quid pro quo with other living breathing beings.

the good news, and the secret that not everyone is hip to, is that the relationships are actually the reward here, the result you're seeking is merely a means to human connection. establishing a goal and blazing your way to the finish line is all well and good, and success feels great for about 2 days. then the realization kicks in that life is pretty much what is was before you won the prize, there is no finish line, the work is never done, and if you're not part of a team that celebrates and suffers with you, victories ring a little hollow. so while i would never say it isn't possible to achieve what you want the way you're hoping to, i AM saying that it's not going to be the experience you think it is.

that's my unorthodox $.02, feel free to heed or ignore as you see fit.


gregoire
del
ubk
.
Old 6th September 2007
  #15
Gear Maniac
 

The post above me is one of the most well reasoned opinions I've ever seen on the music business (and life in general). Everthing in most industries is based on personal relationships, when you apply for a job, have you ever been hired straight away because of your great looking resume? No way, if you had graduated with 1st class honours from your university, worked everywhere for a long time, had great references and the guy interviewing you thought you were a tosser, you'd never get the job. This industry (like most) is all about getting and maintaining good personal relationships with the people who you rely to succeed and who rely on you to succeed.
Old 6th September 2007
  #16
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by u b k View Post
then placing a song with a major is pretty much out of the question for your situation.

if you haven't gotten it from everyone else who's hammered it home, i'll say it a little differently: what you are seeking has almost nothing to do with talent or quality of product, and everything to do with relationships and assistance from other humans who are in a position to help you. if talent were the key to success, the world would look VERY different. but look at every successful person and you will see that persistence is the key, and community is the vehicle.

this is how it is in 99.99% of all human endeavors, the major label game is no exception. getting things done requires collective effort, which requires favors, which requires relationships.

if you truly believe you need to move to central london to make the kinds of connections we're talking about (and i'm not convinced that's the truth), then your next step is to pack your belongings and move to central london. how much are you willing to risk for this dream? when you ask the universe for something big, you gotta show it you're willing to do big things in return. in this case, you *have* to network, you have to establish quid pro quo with other living breathing beings.

the good news, and the secret that not everyone is hip to, is that the relationships are actually the reward here, the result you're seeking is merely a means to human connection. establishing a goal and blazing your way to the finish line is all well and good, and success feels great for about 2 days. then the realization kicks in that life is pretty much what is was before you won the prize, there is no finish line, the work is never done, and if you're not part of a team that celebrates and suffers with you, victories ring a little hollow. so while i would never say it isn't possible to achieve what you want the way you're hoping to, i AM saying that it's not going to be the experience you think it is.

that's my unorthodox $.02, feel free to heed or ignore as you see fit.


gregoire
del
ubk
.
I understand that its all about the relationships you make with people who can help push you in the right direction.

If you dont think its a case of moving to where these relationships can be made, how do you suggest to make them living so far out the way?

I had the idea of being quite obnoxious and just ringing people up and saying heres the deal!

Though thats cool because not many people are 'nice' or genuine and most who have high positions dont deserve them.

At the end of next year I'll have completed my bachelors degree in contemporary music but I'll still be no further forwards.
Old 6th September 2007
  #17
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Kyle Ashley's Avatar
 

In my consulting work with an established entertainment attorney, I've learned that it's all about knowing the right person at the right time and Gregoire's post is right on the money. You have to meet EVERYONE you can, and build relationships with REPUTABLE industry folk. Long distance, or mail order type of arrangements will probably not get you there, and a lot of those song competitions and contests are not worth the entry fees.

I once read in Wired magazine that in the future, wealth will be measured by your network, relationships, and connections, and not so defined by money.

With 25 years in the business behind me, I've seen a lot of things come and go, and honestly, luck always plays a part in any success. But as the old saying goes, "Luck is where preparation meets opportunity". The preparation part is up to you....create the best material you can, make it relevant, and make it competitive. The opportunity part means that you will probably need to be in London, or any other large market that allow opportunities to occur, because honestly, you just can't build the necessary relationships out in the country.

Doesn't have to be as far away as London though....Glasgow, Edinburgh, and even Newcastle may open some doors for you. The other important thing to consider is your personality. If you are a shy and reclusive loner......not so good. If you're a great people person and salesman.....your chances go up.

Good Luck!!
Old 6th September 2007
  #18
Gear Guru
 
u b k's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tempest19 View Post
If you dont think its a case of moving to where these relationships can be made, how do you suggest to make them living so far out the way?

I had the idea of being quite obnoxious and just ringing people up and saying heres the deal!

you want to create a network of people willing to help you, and your plan is to cold call and be obnoxious? to call people who already have what you can barely envision, and tell them what the deal is? let me know how that works out.

there is, ime, only one tried and true way to get people to help you: you have to help them first. got to amazon right now and spend $20 to get _Never Eat Alone_, it is the BIBLE of building relationships based on mutual trust, respect, and support.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tempest19 View Post
Though thats cool because not many people are 'nice' or genuine and most who have high positions dont deserve them.

if you believe that story, it will be true for you, and you are doomed. i suggest you create a different story.

how about this one: "there are good people in every station of life, people who are talented and generous. i know i can find them, and i know there are ways i can contribute to their success. my own success will likely follow as a matter of course, and i'll enjoy the ride regardless."

my last tip for you: it is far better to be fulfilled than to be successful.


gregoire
del
ubk
.
Old 6th September 2007
  #19
Gear Addict
 
Jens's Avatar
 

Try this, comes with all sorts of leads.

http://www.songlink.com/

/Jens
Old 6th September 2007
  #20
Dan
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Dan's Avatar
 

I have to say, I completely agree with U B K's posts. And might add that's theres a myriad of potential ways to meet people. I've been floored at how some are able to attract people into their lives. It gets a little into the metaphysical realm, but it's a good idea to start thinking about concrete things you can do to start and build relationships with people you want in your life. I think of it in terms of "What do they really want, and how can I give it to them?" It's not the same for everyone.
Old 6th September 2007
  #21
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by u b k View Post
you want to create a network of people willing to help you, and your plan is to cold call and be obnoxious? to call people who already have what you can barely envision, and tell them what the deal is? let me know how that works out.

there is, ime, only one tried and true way to get people to help you: you have to help them first. got to amazon right now and spend $20 to get _Never Eat Alone_, it is the BIBLE of building relationships based on mutual trust, respect, and support.





if you believe that story, it will be true for you, and you are doomed. i suggest you create a different story.

how about this one: "there are good people in every station of life, people who are talented and generous. i know i can find them, and i know there are ways i can contribute to their success. my own success will likely follow as a matter of course, and i'll enjoy the ride regardless."

my last tip for you: it is far better to be fulfilled than to be successful.


gregoire
del
ubk
.

I dont mean to tell them whats what. I mean to say this is what I do, this is what I'm willing to do. All I need is a chance.

I understand what you're saying but I dont understand HOW to meet these people and make relationships with them.

Regardless of any relationships made I will never kiss arse or pretend to like people that I dont.

I believe there are a lot of nice people but the people that can get me where I want to be or the ones I deal with will end up being the nasty ones.

Let me pose another question.

How about these small publishing companies. I'm sure theres even some quite local. Do they accept work that is unsolicited?

Will they have the same contacts and opportunities to push you as the larger companies?
Old 6th September 2007
  #22
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jens View Post
Thanks buddy, that looks like a pretty good website.

I'll book mark it and take a look later when I'm not broke from paying my tuition fees!
Old 7th September 2007
  #23
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RKrizman's Avatar
 

Following a shipwreck, a mathematician, a physicist and an economist were stuck in the middle of the ocean on a rubber raft with only a single can of beans to eat. They saved it as long as they could, but finally realized that it was time to eat the beans or die of starvation. The question then became "How do we get the beans out of the can?"

Being three highly intelligent people they applied their collective intelligence.

After thinking for awhile, the physicist said "Aha, I can focus the sunlight through the lense in my glasses onto the can and heat it up. The contents will expand, exploding the can, and the beans will all come flying out."

"Perfect," said the mathematician. "I can then calculate the exact trajectory of each bean so we can retrieve them".

When they looked at the economist for approval for their idea, he shook his head and said "No, no, no, that's much too complex. Now first of all, assume we have a can opener........"

-R
Old 7th September 2007
  #24
Gear Addict
 
Old Cane's Avatar
 

First, make sure you have what it takes.

When I was 18 I moved to Nashville, enrolled in school and went to music stores, clubs, studios, etc. It never occured to me i couldn't walk in to the biggest studio in town and ask to look around. At the time I think they were so flabergahsted they said "sure". Maybe they thought I was some big stars son, I don't know. I always talk to players no matter how good or how bad because at the moment, it's their turn not mine. I landed a house job in Nashville my second night in town at age 18. Meet people. If you have to move, move! I have no clue what the music scene is in the UK. Here there are lots of players and not much work. Let me rephrase that, not enough work for all to make a good living.

Let's say you were a dancer and there was no place to dance in your town. Would you move? What if you were a lumberjack and lived in the desert? Time to move. If there is a local music scene, get into it! Meet bands, singers, players, club owners, etc. You actually will make friends but don't get pushy and only focus on you. Really make these people your friends. A friend will listen to what you write, maybe write with you or talk his band into playing it (or maybe advise you to become an auto mechanic). And you've got new friends now whether it helps your career or not.

Get out there! You can't sit home and hope they come to you. You can't send out material and expect it to get listened to but most publishers have an office. Stop by. They may call the police but you're young. You can run, right? Get to know the person at the front desk. Take someone to lunch. Ask questions and listen to what they say. There may be an opening for a janitor at a studio, publishing house or label. It's hard but you need to be in the right place at the right time.
Old 7th September 2007
  #25
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uncle duncan's Avatar
 

Over here in the states we have songwriter organizations - Nashville Songwriter's Assoc., Westcoast Songwriter's Assoc. - they hold seminars all around the country, where unknown songwriters can play songs for publishers. This is a good way to make those connections. I would think there would be a similar thing going on in the UK.

There's also SongU.com, which has online classes, and pitching opportunities, much like Taxi. Most of their listings appear to be up-and-coming artists looking for songs, with the occasional major label artist in the mix. You can submit songs via MP3's, view seminars online, get your own song coach to help you sort out your songs and your career path, although aiming for a career in music wouldn't seem to be a bright move these days. With all the illegal downloading, there's not as much money to go around, and I would think getting yourself a real job and doing music on the side could be much more rewarding, in the sense that you'd get to do the music you want to do, instead of the music you have to do to make a living.
Old 7th September 2007
  #26
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H-Rezz's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tempest19 View Post
Not sure what forum this should be in but this one seems to offer the most advice.

So I know people here have had success with placements on majors.

If anybody would like to share their stories, I think it would benefit a lot of people here.

Is the best approach to go through a publisher or go straight to the label?

Would it be good to send a demo to a label but state you're a songwriter and not looking to get signed yourself?

Shortly I'm going to be putting these theories to the test as I try to get one of my songs placed.

Thanks,

Chris
Without reading this whole thread , if i were you i would find a pro-active publisher and organize song assignments , this is done on a song per song basis , it will be the usual cut as though you had a publishing deal without being tied to more than that one song or songs given to that publisher . If the publisher feels your songs are strong enough it's in their interest to find your songs a home .....

If you sell a songs on your own you would have to organize an admin deal with some publisher to collect your royalities , this a smaller cut than them placing it themselves ...

None of the above provides an advance , unless maybe you have a proven run rate..
Old 7th September 2007
  #27
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tempest,

dude i think you are missing the point of what u.b.k. is saying to you. he is telling the truth. the music game is a perpetual hustle and you are really only as good as your last hit. it is all about relationships

the first thing that you have to understand is that people want to get on a "moving ship"...meaning if it you believe that you are going to be successful with out anyone's help then people are more likely to help you. if you look like you really need the help then they won't. just a fact of life. you sitting around waiting/wishing for someone the reach out their hand to help you more than likely won't happen. you gotta make the move first...move to london.

you have to take a risk to do this and even if you fall on you arse 5 times you have to get back up because you believe in your self and your dream.

songwriting is a numbers game....it is about volume. so if you have 1 hot song you really need ten of them. if you have ten then you need 100.

it would take too much to explian all the way you can hustle to make relationships. you've got myspace..loads of unsigned artsts , parties clubs..etc...meet people and get you stuff recorded....if it is not recorded then it does not exist.

the easeist way to getting songs placed is to work with people who are getting songs placed. that is how i got in. to do this you may have to sacrifice a song or two and let some one who is more connceted than you write the bridge or second verse or let the artist write on the song to get started but it does work. you will get screwed at some point. we all do and that is part of the life.

i always ask people who have been in this for 30 or 40 years how did they do it or stay in it...they alll always say never give up.

i will leave you with thei Mike Stern quote:

"if you wanna be a musician(or in your case songwriter), don't cause it is a hard life wiht a lot of hard knocks but if you have to be a musician/songwriter...it is the greatest job in the world"

which is it for you?

ej
Old 7th September 2007
  #28
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lofi's Avatar
 

IME its all personal relationships and connections....

and its a BIG BIG BIG sacrifice...

Old 11th July 2012
  #29
Gear Head
 

screwed

That's great.

I'm horribly schizophrenic and introverted
so I'm pretty much screwed then.

Sucks pretty bad for me to,
because I put it over 20 hours a week and about 3 albums a year.
I'm not one of these people who don't walk the walk.
I also have a music technology degree.

I have a question that might help the guy who originally asked this though:

are there any music libraries that actually try to get you song placements.
From my experience,
most of them just put you on a list and wish you luck.

I'm totally changing my game.
I'm going out to start a band now
so I can piggy back off some more social people while actually being the one doing all of the work like usual.

It's ironic because I actually need to stop making so much music and start working on the stuff that seems mundane to me like myspace and whatnot.

The music industry sure isn't set up for people like us,
but to everyone else on here who's frustrated..
don't give up.
Just go into high gear instead and do everything in your power to succeed no matter how uncomfortable it makes you.
Believe me,
It'll make me a lot more uncomfortable that it will for you.
I am so mentally ill that I'm afraid to even leave my house
so you can do it if I'm going to.
Old 12th July 2012
  #30
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by psychosis View Post
It's ironic because I actually need to stop making so much music and start working on the stuff that seems mundane to me like myspace and whatnot.
Myspace? Isn't that the hot new site "all the kids" are talking about nowadays?
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