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Is soffit mounting much better compare to free standing? Studio Monitors
Old 27th October 2018
  #1
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Is soffit mounting much better compare to free standing?

Hi Guys,
I am planning a theater room which measures 4m-4.7m*6m-6.3m*2.7m, for LRC I would be using Genelec 1238A or ATC150(If you have experience with both and would like to share I would also appreciate it), but I am not a pro so I don't have experience with soffit mounting, my question is would it sound a lot better compare to free standing?

I ask this because I just bought a pair of Kii Threes and they sound amazing. If a pseudo soffit mounting speaker could sound so good then I have to assume real soffit mounting ones would be even better.

I also have a pair of Genelec 8351 however both 8351&Kii are small speakers which would have 10dB smaller headroom compare to 1238 or atc150, so I won't use those for LCR.

This is my first thread here, I don't know if you welcome a non-pro, but deep in my bone I consider myself a semi-pro, I used to be in a band and love music&music production for more than 20 years.

Thanks in advance.
Old 27th October 2018
  #2
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Yes.

It solves a lot of acoustic issues to soffit. However, using active speakers, you need to re-rack the amps to a cool-able location.

Something like the Kii3 is not comparable to a full-size soffit mounted speaker. The Kii3 design makes the best of any room in a nearfield, low dynamic relationship. A lot of energy and drivers are devoted to fixing the situation they are in (sound "beaming" in the Kii3)

A soffit mounted large format speaker is about energising a whole room without acoustic low-end issues and with high dynamic range. All energy and design is going towards sound reproduction.
Old 27th October 2018
  #3
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But.. to speak broadly, your choices are poorly selected. For a theater (with those specific requirements and dynamic range), you should be looking at JBL Cinema Series and Meyer Sound.

ATC and Genelec are on the "musical" side of sound reproduction.
The JBL Cinema Series and Meyer Sound are designed for specific requirements for theater: (limited) area coverage -- which is important to not have overlap/phase/reinforcement issues, large dynamic range (almost exclusively the domain of compression drivers and horns), sound focusing (2-ways with woofer are the standard) in separate cabinets so you can direct the sound.

Theater design is not the same thing as general music performance (if you want to do it right)
Old 27th October 2018
  #4
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Don't forget Dolby Cinema Speakers from SLS. They have a very cool Atmos configurator.
Will you be using a perf screen ?
Old 27th October 2018
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pentagon View Post
Yes.

It solves a lot of acoustic issues to soffit. However, using active speakers, you need to re-rack the amps to a cool-able location.

Something like the Kii3 is not comparable to a full-size soffit mounted speaker. The Kii3 design makes the best of any room in a nearfield, low dynamic relationship. A lot of energy and drivers are devoted to fixing the situation they are in (sound "beaming" in the Kii3)

A soffit mounted large format speaker is about energising a whole room without acoustic low-end issues and with high dynamic range. All energy and design is going towards sound reproduction.
Thanks pentagon. Very informative. Kii Threes' headroom is indeed small compare to their rated power output.
Old 27th October 2018
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pentagon View Post
But.. to speak broadly, your choices are poorly selected. For a theater (with those specific requirements and dynamic range), you should be looking at JBL Cinema Series and Meyer Sound.

ATC and Genelec are on the "musical" side of sound reproduction.
The JBL Cinema Series and Meyer Sound are designed for specific requirements for theater: (limited) area coverage -- which is important to not have overlap/phase/reinforcement issues, large dynamic range (almost exclusively the domain of compression drivers and horns), sound focusing (2-ways with woofer are the standard) in separate cabinets so you can direct the sound.

Theater design is not the same thing as general music performance (if you want to do it right)
Oh I forgot to mention this small "theater" is not only for movie, but also for music enjoyments, and there won't be so many people here either.

So I thought if the best gears for music reproduction would also suit cinema sound, then it would be perfect for me

If I am understanding it right, the reference level of film mixing is 83dB single speaker, with a maximum headroom of 20dB(which makes it 103dB maximum) according to
Level Practices (Part 2) - Digido.com

Since I would be sitting 3-4m from the main speakers and 1238 could produce a 105dB long term spl level at 5m distance, I would assume 1238 would be more than enough for my needs. However pls correct me if I was wrong

I also assume 1238/atc150 would be better suited for music than JBL cinema speakers, am I right?
Old 27th October 2018
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEHARRIS View Post
Don't forget Dolby Cinema Speakers from SLS. They have a very cool Atmos configurator.
Will you be using a perf screen ?
Most likely I won't use a perf screen, I am thinking about a 135" stewart studiotek130 fixed frame, for which I could put center speaker below the screen.
I also thought about double center speaker one above and one below the screen, you know to make a phantom center right in the screen center.

However I am not sure how bad the comb filter effects would be.
Old 27th October 2018
  #8
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I think the Genelec with waveguide will be better than the ATC at distance.
We assisted a family member in a high end theater...a bit larger, using 1234SAM for L C R. Perf screen Subs were 4x JL f212s..WOOF
Old 27th October 2018
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEHARRIS View Post
I think the Genelec with waveguide will be better than the ATC at distance.
We assisted a family member in a high end theater...a bit larger, using 1234SAM for L C R. Perf screen Subs were 4x JL f212s..WOOF
JL subs? If mains are 1234 why not use Genelec subs? I am facing the same which-to-go decision here...
Old 27th October 2018
  #10
Gear Addict
Genelec on film theatre designs:

https://www.genelec.com/sites/defaul...0806_web_0.pdf

I don’t understand why Genelec’s bigger designs, say 1234s and 7382 subs, are not able to reproduce film audio material even at larger (3-5 meters) distance.

125-130 dB @ 1m should suffice, shouldn’t it?
Old 27th October 2018
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DB117 View Post
If I am understanding it right, the reference level of film mixing is 83dB single speaker, with a maximum headroom of 20dB(which makes it 103dB maximum) according to
Level Practices (Part 2) - Digido.com
That's incorrect. Each screen channel speaker needs to produce 85dBC when given -20dbfs pink noise RMS.
However, in a home cinema, those levels are not usually played. It requires a large room to actually be tuned to those numbers (like a dubbing stage or actual movie theater.)
Also, make sure you are actually seeing max continuous number and not max/max peak/max musical or any other variety of terms makers use. And most of these numbers are band limited (100Hz low end and higher.) It's one of the reasons dedicated subs+2-ways is the usual design for theater speakers. The linear frequency response given about a speaker is not necessarily (usually) the same way the loudness of a speaker is measured.

This is about the 1238A (note the asterisk about the loudness level)



On top of that, you usually want +6 to +10 dB above 85dBC (@-20dBfs) available to avoid driver compression artifacts. But that's if you want truly pristine sound.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DB117 View Post
Since I would be sitting 3-4m from the main speakers and 1238 could produce a 105dB long term spl level at 5m distance, I would assume 1238 would be more than enough for my needs. However pls correct me if I was wrong
At 5m, for a short term sine wave output at 5 m on axis in half space (in-wall), averaged 100 Hz – 3 kHz, it will produce 107dB with 3% THD (that's a lot distortion for higher frequencies which is why Genelec limits the measurement to there).
This won't cut it for a theater if you want to cover out to 5m with a 85dBC/105dBC max continuous. And subs aren't going to help because this is already a bandlimited measurement above what subs are usually aiding.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DB117 View Post
I also assume 1238/atc150 would be better suited for music than JBL cinema speakers, am I right?
This would be true

Lot of work designing a "real" theater and there's a reason that cinema speakers are closer to PA/Venue speaker design than home/audiophile design.

Genelec has speakers in their line up more designed for theaters. The 1238DF
is better suited (it requires a sub but by redirecting its output energy for a limited range, it is able to give you more headroom for that range and then you add as many subs as necessary per speaker to compensate for room size)

The ATC's numbers are actually max continuous so that's a good thing. The 150ASL will get you 103dBC at 5m max cont. The 200ASL will get 104dBC. The 300ASL will get you 107dBC max continuous.

Last edited by pentagon; 27th October 2018 at 09:38 PM.. Reason: typo
Old 27th October 2018
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DB117 View Post
Most likely I won't use a perf screen, I am thinking about a 135" stewart studiotek130 fixed frame, for which I could put center speaker below the screen.
I also thought about double center speaker one above and one below the screen, you know to make a phantom center right in the screen center.

However I am not sure how bad the comb filter effects would be.
Bad idea all around.
First, the size of these speaker will make putting a speaker under or over the screen odd. These guys aren't little.

Second, the center channel needs to anchor the audience to the dialogue. Putting it low blasts the front row and dampens the sound for the back row (all the mid-highend will be blocked.) Above the screen and it comes out as "the voice of god." It's definitely better above (especially since if you put it under, the screen would have to be really high) but best is behind.

Third, dual center....
Old 27th October 2018
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEHARRIS View Post
I think the Genelec with waveguide will be better than the ATC at distance.
Agreed
ATC are 110 degree horizontal by 30 degree vertical dispersion. They intentionally don't have a wide vertical dispersion to avoid/limit floor/desk reflections.

However theater coverage of an area of seats needs the 100-80 degrees horizontal by 80-50 degrees vertical design. What's commonly found in speakers designed for cinema.
Old 28th October 2018
  #14
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This is very enlightening!
Thanks man!

So basically in my situation both Genelec 1238A & ATC150 would suffice for my needs(LCR).

Now another question:in your experience, what's the difference between LCR channels & surround/ceiling channels about SPL max output level in a movie mix?
For example if the peak output level is -3dbFS(consider no clipping of sine wave) for LCR channels, what would the peak level of surround channels be?

I ask this because power match is important in a theater design, I don't want the bottleneck of the system to be on different levels(meaning I want all those speakers overload at the same time/condition, not surrounds overload much earlier than LCR, that way would cause a waste of money on LCR size)

Thanks again Pentagon!

Quote:
Originally Posted by pentagon View Post
That's incorrect. Each screen channel speaker needs to produce 85dBC when given -20dbfs pink noise RMS.
However, in a home cinema, those levels are not usually played. It requires a large room to actually be tuned to those numbers (like a dubbing stage or actual movie theater.)
Also, make sure you are actually seeing max continuous number and not max/max peak/max musical or any other variety of terms makers use. And most of these numbers are band limited (100Hz low end and higher.) It's one of the reasons dedicated subs+2-ways is the usual design for theater speakers. The linear frequency response given about a speaker is not necessarily (usually) the same way the loudness of a speaker is measured.

This is about the 1238A (note the asterisk about the loudness level)


On top of that, you usually want +6 to +10 dB above 85dBC (@-20dBfs) available to avoid driver compression artifacts. But that's if you want truly pristine sound.

At 5m, for a short term sine wave output at 5 m on axis in half space (in-wall), averaged 100 Hz – 3 kHz, it will produce 107dB with 3% THD (that's a lot distortion for higher frequencies which is why Genelec limits the measurement to there).
This won't cut it for a theater if you want to cover out to 5m with a 85dBC/105dBC max continuous. And subs aren't going to help because this is already a bandlimited measurement above what subs are usually aiding.


This would be true

Lot of work designing a "real" theater and there's a reason that cinema speakers are closer to PA/Venue speaker design than home/audiophile design.

Genelec has speakers in their line up more designed for theaters. The 1238DF
is better suited (it requires a sub but by redirecting its output energy for a limited range, it is able to give you more headroom for that range and then you add as many subs as necessary per speaker to compensate for room size)

The ATC's numbers are actually max continuous so that's a good thing. The 150ASL will get you 103dBC at 5m max cont. The 200ASL will get 104dBC. The 300ASL will get you 107dBC max continuous.
Old 28th October 2018
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pentagon View Post
Bad idea all around.
First, the size of these speaker will make putting a speaker under or over the screen odd. These guys aren't little.

Second, the center channel needs to anchor the audience to the dialogue. Putting it low blasts the front row and dampens the sound for the back row (all the mid-highend will be blocked.) Above the screen and it comes out as "the voice of god." It's definitely better above (especially since if you put it under, the screen would have to be really high) but best is behind.

Third, dual center....
The theater would be only for 1-4 people(actually 95% of the time would be for only myself, man cave you know ), most likely only one row, so I don't have to worry about front/back row issues.

For dual centers I actually saw a thread(forgot where) in which the OP did it and found a pleasing result.

Theoretically dual centers vertically with a distance of around 2m between each other and 3-4m to audience would cause a vertical interference pattern, in which higher FQ band (from 2kHZ and up) would be difficult to treat because when your head move a little bit up or down the sound would change, for lower FQ band(lower than 2kHZ) we actually could use EQ to treat it very well.(if the distance from audience to both the two center speakers is the same, we even don't need to EQ it, because that way the audience's ear would be on the spot of positive enhancement point for all FQ band)

Well this is purely theoretical, I don't know what would it be like in practice
Old 28th October 2018
  #16
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Current requirements for Dolby Atmos (since you mentioned ceiling speakers) is that they are the same as the screen channels in output ability and frequency range. In the previous Dolby requirements, surrounds were -3dB down from the screen channels and bandwidth limited (they did not need to go down to 40Hz). Not anymore.

Dolby does, though, allow for sub/satellite design for surrounds/ceiling in Atmos so the ceiling speaker low frequency extension can be located with a mated sub.

Quote:
For example if the peak output level is -3dbFS(consider no clipping of sine wave) for LCR channels, what would the peak level of surround channels be?
I have no idea what this means because this seems like something completely arbitrary. First off, sine waves aren't used for calibration for Dolby. Second, why -3?

You are mixing up an analog chain and a digital source. Clipping at the converters (what db Full Scale means) has no relevance to speaker output and driver overload/compression. For digital, you aren't clipping (true peak measurement) at even -0.1dBFs (because it is still below 0dBFs.) What's happening in the analogue domain after the converters is a completely different/unknown story.

But getting back to surrounds/ceiling vs LCR screen channels... the requirements are that the surrounds/ceiling measure up to the capabilities of the screen channels now. However, no re-recording mixer I know of uses that kind of headroom for the surround/ceilings. So it is a matter of requirement vs practical application. The most driven speaker will be your Center screen channel followed closely by the Left and Right screen channels. Even though Dolby requests that the surround and ceilings have the same capability as the front channels, mixers aren't sending that kind of signal to those surround/ceiling speakers. (though leaving aside LCR and surrounds/ceiling speakers, the requirements for the LFE can be very demanding)

And another practical point to be made... you will rarely get a theatrical mix (unless you are an actual theater with DCP playback ability.) Items mixed for the home (no matter what the delivery mechanism: optical disk or streaming) are mixed with less dynamic range to suit what the playback systems would commonly be. This includes Atmos which has a Home Theater Atmos spec which is different than Theatrical ATMOS. So you could design a home theater that could have commercial theater capabilities but never have media that would actually take advantage of it.

And that's a good thing -- small rooms (like your theater) playing commercial theater mixes means you will have a hard time hearing dialogue. You can't play the same dynamic range in a small room that you can in large room and the cost will be the dialogue will be buried. That's the reason why there are separate mixes (or in the case of some dolby formats, a different decode that fixes for home playback.) The dynamic range is compressed for home playback so the dialogue will be loud enough to sit with the peaks and quietest parts of the film.
Old 28th October 2018
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DB117 View Post
For dual centers I actually saw a thread(forgot where) in which the OP did it and found a pleasing result.
If you can afford an ATC 150ASL for a center channel, you can afford an acoustically transparent screen to do it right.

There's no point in doing something wrong like "dual center" speakers.
Old 28th October 2018
  #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pentagon View Post
But getting back to surrounds/ceiling vs LCR screen channels... the requirements are that the surrounds/ceiling measure up to the capabilities of the screen channels now. However, no re-recording mixer I know of uses that kind of headroom for the surround/ceilings. So it is a matter of requirement vs practical application. The most driven speaker will be your Center screen channel followed closely by the Left and Right screen channels. Even though Dolby requests that the surround and ceilings have the same capability as the front channels, mixers aren't sending that kind of signal to those surround/ceiling speakers. (though leaving aside LCR and surrounds/ceiling speakers, the requirements for the LFE can be very demanding)
Thanks pentagon, this is exactly what I am asking. People tend to ignore ceiling speaker importance(pick whatever could hang there) and I always thought that would cause ceiling speaker to distort much earlier than LCR thus lower the system bottle neck.

About the other question, allow me to put it this way: If my center speaker could generate a max 111dB SPL at my listening position without distortion, what would the minimum requirements be for surround/ceiling speakers under the same measurements in your opinion? 108dB? 101dB(or whatever in-between)?

Quote:
Originally Posted by pentagon View Post
And another practical point to be made... you will rarely get a theatrical mix (unless you are an actual theater with DCP playback ability.) Items mixed for the home (no matter what the delivery mechanism: optical disk or streaming) are mixed with less dynamic range to suit what the playback systems would commonly be. This includes Atmos which has a Home Theater Atmos spec which is different than Theatrical ATMOS. So you could design a home theater that could have commercial theater capabilities but never have media that would actually take advantage of it.

And that's a good thing -- small rooms (like your theater) playing commercial theater mixes means you will have a hard time hearing dialogue. You can't play the same dynamic range in a small room that you can in large room and the cost will be the dialogue will be buried. That's the reason why there are separate mixes (or in the case of some dolby formats, a different decode that fixes for home playback.) The dynamic range is compressed for home playback so the dialogue will be loud enough to sit with the peaks and quietest parts of the film.
So what is the headroom above reference level in a home theater mix? In commercial mix the headroom is 20dB right?

I assume between commercial mix and home mix the reference level is the same, the difference is only on headrooms, we can tolerate higher SPL with a longer reverb time in a bigger room. Please correct me if I am wrong.
Old 28th October 2018
  #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pentagon View Post
If you can afford an ATC 150ASL for a center channel, you can afford an acoustically transparent screen to do it right.

There's no point in doing something wrong like "dual center" speakers.
Yeal it's not the price of perf screens alone that makes me hesitate on perf screens, that would be a much longer story
Old 28th October 2018
  #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DB117 View Post
About the other question, allow me to put it this way: If my center speaker could generate a max 111dB SPL at my listening position without distortion, what would the minimum requirements be for surround/ceiling speakers under the same measurements in your opinion? 108dB? 101dB(or whatever in-between)?
Technically the same. So 111dB.
But that is so far outside of safety standards.
Theater mixes are based on calibrating the room and then doing whatever makes it sound good. There are no requirements. But the room for playback will have limitations by simply being calibrated to certain standards.

TV/Home mixes are about certain specs. They have to conform to the delivery specs. (and in many countries, legislated limits.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by DB117 View Post
So what is the headroom above reference level in a home theater mix? In commercial mix the headroom is 20dB right?
It doesn't work quite like that. In a TV/home theater(HT) setup, the (smaller room) setup would be calibrated to 78dBC vs the 85dBC of a dub stage for film. So you have a 7dB drop. So you are probably thinking that a simple way of looking at it is now a case of 13dB of headroom. But as I mentioned, the mix is designed to be compressed. So dialogue would have played at -31dBFs in a cinema theater room with -20dBFS = 85dBC. In a HT setup, dialogue would be at -24dBFs in a room where -20dBFs =85dBC but you are listening at 78dBC. (some of these numbers are based on country)
So dialogue gets louder at the same time the max level of the mix gets lower. When you listen to it back, naturally, you listen to where the dialogue is most normal. So the overall sound is compressed. (you also have to look at quiet sounds -- not just loud sounds -- say a whisper that can play at -34dB in a commercial cinema would be inaudible unless it was brought up to.) Overall, that means the mix is compressed compared to a theater mix.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DB117 View Post
assume between commercial mix and home mix the reference level is the same, the difference is only on headrooms, we can tolerate higher SPL with a longer reverb time in a bigger room. Please correct me if I am wrong.
You are kind of on the right path. Produced sound from speakers in an enclosed room has two components and they both contribute to the overall SPL of the room: direct sound and reverberant sound. In a large room, the balance will be different from a smaller room which will be mostly direct sound. And reverberant sound will not have the same frequency make up as direct sound -- but they both make up the SPL (sound pressure) in the room. So the Dolby requirement of a room to do 85dBc at -20dBFs at the listening position, some of that is coming from the room reflections/damping/diffusion outside of the direct sound coming straight from the speaker. In a small room, probably 80-90% of the SPL is from the speakers themselves and very little is from the room. So listening at the same levels can be painful vs what is comfortable in a large room (though at the same sound pressure levels.) There's a long history at how these numbers (and how theater sound frequency response which is intentionally not linear from 20Hz to 20KHz) was standardised and it goes back to orchestras in large rooms and what happens from a listening position.
Old 28th October 2018
  #21
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Again thanks a lot pentagon, I am really lucky that my first thread here got a professional's response. Really appreciate your help.


Quote:
Originally Posted by pentagon View Post
It doesn't work quite like that. In a TV/home theater(HT) setup, the (smaller room) setup would be calibrated to 78dBC vs the 85dBC of a dub stage for film. So you have a 7dB drop. So you are probably thinking that a simple way of looking at it is now a case of 13dB of headroom. But as I mentioned, the mix is designed to be compressed. So dialogue would have played at -31dBFs in a cinema theater room with -20dBFS = 85dBC. In a HT setup, dialogue would be at -24dBFs in a room where -20dBFs =85dBC but you are listening at 78dBC. (some of these numbers are based on country)
So what I should do is after the installation, still calibrate each speaker at 85dBC with -20dbFS RMS pink noise, and there would be only a 13dB headroom where the most loud sound is -7dBFS which would measure 98dBC from a single speaker?

It seems that this is very close to music mixing standard(just talk about the maximum SPL potential) where calibrate each speaker at 77dBC with -20dbFS RMS pink noise, and there would be 20dB headroom where the most loud sound is 0dBFS which would measure 97dBC from a single speaker.

As a comparison, in a commercial cinema they would calibrate each speaker at 85dBC with -20dbFS RMS pink noise, and there would be a 20dB headroom where the most loud sound is 0dBFS which would measure 105dBC from a single speaker.

Am I understanding it right?
Old 28th October 2018
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DB117 View Post
As a comparison, in a commercial cinema they would calibrate each speaker at 85dBC with -20dbFS RMS pink noise, and there would be a 20dB headroom where the most loud sound is 0dBFS which would measure 105dBC from a single speaker.

Am I understanding it right?
Yes

Calibrate to 85 then turn down to 78.
Old 28th October 2018
  #23
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Fist, listen to all what pentagon says.
Second, get in touch with Dolby. They have an excel sheet in which you can enter your room dimensions and specify the speakers you want to use. It tells you if they are viable for the Home Theater Atmos certification. That's your best choice.
Old 29th October 2018
  #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pentagon View Post
But.. to speak broadly, your choices are poorly selected. For a theater (with those specific requirements and dynamic range), you should be looking at JBL Cinema Series and Meyer Sound.

Theater design is not the same thing as general music performance (if you want to do it right)
Genelec Room design paper.

NARAS P&EW design guidelines.

Both are germane.
Old 29th October 2018
  #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avare View Post
Genelec Room design paper.

NARAS P&EW design guidelines.

Both are germane.
Wow thanks man! Those are very good information!
Old 30th October 2018
  #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pentagon View Post
So you are probably thinking that a simple way of looking at it is now a case of 13dB of headroom.
I just did a test:
With stereo Kii Three setup, I calibrate dual speaker with -20dB RMS pink noise to 80dBC(which means single speaker 77dBC), I am sitting 1.4m to the speaker and the Kii controller reading is 68.

First I played the movie<Transformers 2014 Age of Extinction 1080p.BluRay.AVC.TrueHD.7.1>, and measured the peak SPL level on my listening position, which is 99.2dBC, so the headroom for this movie is actually at least 99.2-80=19.2dB
BTW with this setup the Kii Threes would sometimes overload(limiter kicks in) which is much earlier than in music playing.

Then I played various high dynamic music and the peak SPL level I got is 95.3dBC, which means music would have a smaller headroom than film(95.3-80=15.3dB)

The interesting result is home theater mix has more then 19.2dB headroom instead of 13dB headroom, which kind of confused me...
Old 30th October 2018
  #27
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Shhh...don't tell anyone. The secret is metadata.

https://www.dolby.com/us/en/technolo...y-metadata.pdf
Old 30th October 2018
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKEHARRIS View Post
Shhh...don't tell anyone. The secret is metadata.

https://www.dolby.com/us/en/technolo...y-metadata.pdf
You guys are really amazing.
Thanks!
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