The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Should I sell my 60's U67? Condenser Microphones
Old 3rd December 2017
  #1
Lives for gear
 
norbury brook's Avatar
 

Should I sell my 60's U67?

I have a lovely original 1960's U67. It's a great mic but I'm beginning to wonder if I should sell it and buy a 'modern' equivalent or 4 and go on holiday :D

Thoughts?



MC
Old 3rd December 2017
  #2
Deleted User
Guest
Yes in the new product section someone is coming out with a new 67 knockoff. The originals are sure to depreciate very rapidly as a result...you better sell yours to me quick right now for very cheap you will be so much happier.
Old 3rd December 2017
  #3
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by norbury brook View Post
I have a lovely original 1960's U67. It's a great mic but I'm beginning to wonder if I should sell it and buy a 'modern' equivalent or 4 and go on holiday :D

Thoughts?



MC
Hey MC,

I'd only sell it if I needed the money.

That's lovely thing to own and it's value is only going in one direction IMHO and that's up!
Old 3rd December 2017
  #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by thehightenor View Post
Hey MC,

I'd only sell it if I needed the money.

That's lovely thing to own and it's value is only going in one direction IMHO and that's up!
And it is very cheap to maintain aswell since practically everything in it is changeable for a a somewhat reasonable price.

That's a mic that you can use and brings a smile to my face every time i use it!
Old 3rd December 2017
  #5
SEED78
Guest
My mate bought a 67 for about 5k a few years back - just sold it for 10k.

I even dreamt about owning a 67 last night (not even joking), was disappointed when I woke up, wahhhh
Old 3rd December 2017
  #6
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
If you're using it, and don't NEED the money, keep it. If it is collecting dust, sell it.
Old 3rd December 2017
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by SEED78 View Post
My mate bought a 67 for about 5k a few years back - just sold it for 10k.

I even dreamt about owning a 67 last night (not even joking), was disappointed when I woke up, wahhhh
I bought one last week for 5k. Great condition, original power supply with an vintage shock mount. Good deals canstill be made today with some luck.

Edit** 6k , still felt i got it for a great price!
Old 3rd December 2017
  #8
SEED78
Guest
67s are too sexy, well done!
Old 3rd December 2017
  #9
Lives for gear
 
iangomes's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by crille_mannen View Post
I bought one last week for 5k. Great condition, original power supply with an vintage shock mount. Good deals canstill be made today with some luck.

Edit** 6k , still felt i got it for a great price!
That is better than a 'good' deal! That is an incredible deal!! Congrats!
Old 4th December 2017
  #10
Lives for gear
 
Mike O's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by norbury brook View Post
I have a lovely original 1960's U67. It's a great mic but I'm beginning to wonder if I should sell it and buy a 'modern' equivalent or 4 and go on holiday :D

Thoughts?



MC
I'd say if you don't know you need your U67 to make the recordings you want or need to make, you really don't need it.

Now is as good a time as any to sell a great mic. Think about all of those folks that have made 20% in the market recently. They *may* not always have that money available.

FWIW I'm keeping my pair as long as I can afford to do so. My guess is that will be when I can no longer afford proper health insurance and illness/aging takes it's inevitable toll. Until then, the sound they capture makes me very happy indeed!
Old 4th December 2017
  #11
Lives for gear
 
vincentvangogo's Avatar
 

For a holiday? I'd sooner sell a kidney.
Old 4th December 2017
  #12
I'd sell, because these are worth way more than they are as tools now. I sold most of my "vintage gear" and don't miss a piece. Everything's being remade along with new tools that improve recording. The only mic I wouldn't sell is my SM69 tube. It's remarkable. My 47 and 67 were great examples but I've discovered boutique mics without the worry for a fraction of the cost. For instance, why have a 480L when you can have the plug in and a Bricasti? Why have a Fairchild when you can put a deposit on a property for your kids and buy Pom's wonderful recreation..... There's no money in music unless you put these in a bank vault with a ton of silica gel.
Old 4th December 2017
  #13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_G View Post
I'd sell, because these are worth way more than they are as tools now. I sold most of my "vintage gear" and don't miss a piece. Everything's being remade along with new tools that improve recording. The only mic I wouldn't sell is my SM69 tube. It's remarkable. My 47 and 67 were great examples but I've discovered boutique mics without the worry for a fraction of the cost. For instance, why have a 480L when you can have the plug in and a Bricasti? Why have a Fairchild when you can put a deposit on a property for your kids and buy Pom's wonderful recreation..... There's no money in music unless you put these in a bank vault with a ton of silica gel.
Hmm, i'd rather keep my u67 then my 269c. I do think the 269c sounds a bit better but the 701 tube gives me stomach ache. Couldn't imagine worrying about two breaking.

Vintage mics are fun and sound "better" then anything newly produced that i have tried. They will not loose its value oppose to a new botique mic that will loose it's value by a 1/3 as soon as you decide to keep it.
Old 4th December 2017
  #14
Quote:
Originally Posted by crille_mannen View Post
Hmm, i'd rather keep my u67 then my 269c. I do think the 269c sounds a bit better but the 701 tube gives me stomach ache. Couldn't imagine worrying about two breaking
I don't pay full new price so I don't worry about loss. Fingers crossed my tubes are healthy for a long while to come. The sound is unbelievable so while they're working I'm very happy.
Old 4th December 2017
  #15
Lives for gear
 
norbury brook's Avatar
 

I'm sort of in agreement with Paul G hence my question. Don't get me wrong it's an amazing mic BUT, it doesn't make a record 'better' . There are so many other things that go into making a record that aren't affected by a boutique or not microphone. I did an album a few years ago and I used the U67 on half the main vocal tracks and a Sontronics Orpheus on the other half. The Orpheus is a mid priced Chinese LDC, but a lovely mic.

I knew at the time which was which but a year or so down the line, I cannot tell you now listening to the CD which track is the U67 and which track is the Orpheus. Maybe without compression/Eq the difference would be obvious but at the end of the day who leaves recordings 'untouched'? I probabaly had to EQ more with the cheaper mic but if the end result is the same why bother.

Just airing some thoughts here so no judgements :D


A vintage U67 does add 'Kudos' to the studio and for some people it's cool to have one, however most of my Clients have no idea or interest in what microphone/EQ/Comp/Pre etc they're going through, only that it sounds good. SO in reality the only people who would know what a U67 is are other engineers/producers and they're not booking me :D


MC
Old 4th December 2017
  #16
SEED78
Guest
Quote:
Originally Posted by norbury brook View Post
A vintage U67 does add 'Kudos' to the studio and for some people it's cool to have one, however most of my Clients have no idea or interest in what microphone/EQ/Comp/Pre etc they're going through, only that it sounds good. SO in reality the only people who would know what a U67 is are other engineers/producers and they're not booking me :D
if that situation isn't likely to change in the near future then you are prob best selling it off then.

With the cash you'd get from the 67 sale you'd easily get 3 or more really high end modern recreations of the classics that would help taylor the mic choice to your various client's voices.

If I had funds from a U67 sale I'd go Chandler Redd (bright detailed, but characterful) + Horch (vintage warm sounding) + AEA 44 - all look snazzy as hell and would impress your clients.

If you specifically wanted a 67 replacement with some bling the ADK Z-mod 67 might be for you (think it sounds possibly cleaner than a OG 67, but people really like it, and looks awesome). The Soundelux U99 is meant to sound like a 67, I personally don't like the way it looks, but it meant to sound ace! RMS do a 269 which is mean to sound real good too.
Old 4th December 2017
  #17
Lives for gear
 
pethenis's Avatar
 

Can only say not a day goes by without me missing mine.
Old 4th December 2017
  #18
SEED78
Guest
I've never regretted anything I've sold - I'm too busy thinking about the next purchase .
Old 4th December 2017
  #19
Lives for gear
 
jjblair's Avatar
No.
Old 4th December 2017
  #20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mappee View Post
I call BS on this statement. I miss all the old gear I've sold and in extreme depressions will actually buy a replacement at current prices, ouch.
Once it's mine and I know how to use it, it's always mine. Do I have a problem?
You haven't seen my studio. Life is too short.
Old 4th December 2017
  #21
Lives for gear
 

All depends on how much you like it vs. how much you like the idea of it.

I agree with those who say that nothing new sounds exactly like the old gear. My rejoinder would be that that doesn't mean the new stuff isn't just as good, it may just be a slightly different flavor of good.

I've heard great sounding records made with all different types of gear—vintage, boutique, new, old, standards that everyone uses and obscure gear that few have heard of.

I respect the person who says, "I've tried 23 new microphones and nothing does exactly what my vintage U47 or U67 or whatever does and I just can't bear to not be able to get that 5% difference." I respect that point of view and believe that there is an elusive 5-10% difference between most new emulations and the mics they are designed to emulate.

So it just comes down to how attached you are to that 5-10%.
Old 4th December 2017
  #22
Lives for gear
 
jjblair's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by drpeacock View Post
All depends on how much you like it vs. how much you like the idea of it.

I agree with those who say that nothing new sounds exactly like the old gear. My rejoinder would be that that doesn't mean the new stuff isn't just as good, it may just be a slightly different flavor of good.

I've heard great sounding records made with all different types of gear—vintage, boutique, new, old, standards that everyone uses and obscure gear that few have heard of.

I respect the person who says, "I've tried 23 new microphones and nothing does exactly what my vintage U47 or U67 or whatever does and I just can't bear to not be able to get that 5% difference." I respect that point of view and believe that there is an elusive 5-10% difference between most new emulations and the mics they are designed to emulate.

So it just comes down to how attached you are to that 5-10%.
I think it's much bigger than 5-10%, personally. However, there were many great records made without U47s, C12s and Fairchilds. I somehow managed to make some good sounding records without that stuff, once upon a time.

I'm trying to attract clients in LA, so having a Wunder and a Beezkneez ain't gonna cut it. I have major studios to compete with. But I got into my collection for a fraction of the going rate. However, here's how I look at it: Would you sell your '57 Strat so you could buy yourself an Eric Johnson model Strat, a Schecter, a PRS, and a Gibson Custom Shop Les Paul? If the answer is yes, then you haven't done much buying and selling of vintage gear. My gear is not only a tool for my trade, it's an investment. My microphone and guitar collections have outperformed my stocks over the last 25 years by exponential amounts, with the exception of the Apple I bought a day before the iPhone was announced. Every time over the last 15 years I thought I saw the top of the mic market, it kept going. And unlike guitars, it didn't crater after 2008.

So, with that in mind, maybe ask yourself that question with a different perspective. Because I can tell you that every time I have bought a new mic, I do not get my money back out of it when I have sold it. Same with any new gear. But my vintage gear seems to always appreciate.
Old 4th December 2017
  #23
Lives for gear
 
norbury brook's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjblair View Post
I think it's much bigger than 5-10%, personally. However, there were many great records made without U47s, C12s and Fairchilds. I somehow managed to make some good sounding records without that stuff, once upon a time.

I'm trying to attract clients in LA, so having a Wunder and a Beezkneez ain't gonna cut it. I have major studios to compete with. But I got into my collection for a fraction of the going rate. However, here's how I look at it: Would you sell your '57 Strat so you could buy yourself an Eric Johnson model Strat, a Schecter, a PRS, and a Gibson Custom Shop Les Paul? If the answer is yes, then you haven't done much buying and selling of vintage gear. My gear is not only a tool for my trade, it's an investment. My microphone and guitar collections have outperformed my stocks over the last 25 years by exponential amounts, with the exception of the Apple I bought a day before the iPhone was announced. Every time over the last 15 years I thought I saw the top of the mic market, it kept going. And unlike guitars, it didn't crater after 2008.

So, with that in mind, maybe ask yourself that question with a different perspective. Because I can tell you that every time I have bought a new mic, I do not get my money back out of it when I have sold it. Same with any new gear. But my vintage gear seems to always appreciate.

As a gigging/studio guitar player I'd be better served with a selection of 'newer' guitars than just one 57 strat.

Grear isn't about the 'investment' its about it's use. I have bitcoins and property in London for investment!!!

the analogy between the 57 strat and a few other more modern guitars is the same with a vintage mic, one vintage U67 isn't as useful as 6 or 7 different more 'modern' mics

I've been in this business professionally for 35 years and if I've learned anything its : it's NOT about the gear.



MC
Old 4th December 2017
  #24
[QUOTE=jjblair;12997982]I think it's much bigger than 5-10%, personally. However, there were many great records made without U47s, C12s and Fairchilds. I somehow managed to make some good sounding records without that stuff, once upon a time.

I'm trying to attract clients in LA, so having a Wunder and a Beezkneez ain't gonna cut it. I have major studios to compete with. But I got into my collection for a fraction of the going rate./QUOTE]


For me it's just something magical about the whole spectra in the 269/u67, it sounds so natural and pleasing. And it handles sibilance like no other. That is the nr.1 major flaw in every mic test i've listened to, new mic's trying something new like the Redd or the Telef's reissue , and other clones. The topend is always bright and the sibilance is always to pronunced.

Like you said there are tons of albums done with whatever gear is available but im sure if you are able to choice whatever you like it's easy to turn to the classics. Both for the sound and the history. It gives the recording weight and may inspire you to do a even better job just like a good classic guitar can give you.

Anyways keep on rockin and doing music!
Old 4th December 2017
  #25
Lives for gear
 
jjblair's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by norbury brook View Post
As a gigging/studio guitar player I'd be better served with a selection of 'newer' guitars than just one 57 strat.

Grear isn't about the 'investment' its about it's use. I have bitcoins and property in London for investment!!!

the analogy between the 57 strat and a few other more modern guitars is the same with a vintage mic, one vintage U67 isn't as useful as 6 or 7 different more 'modern' mics

I've been in this business professionally for 35 years and if I've learned anything its : it's NOT about the gear.



MC
Well, if you need variety, then that's your need. I could sell my Burst and buy a boatload of guitars, but I've never played another guitar, aside from a small handful of other Bursts that does what that guitar does, and it would bum me out to no end to not have that guitar. And I've tried everything to recreate that sound.

However, there are guys who sold their Bursts to buy other things, at a time when they thought the value could never get any higher, who were wrong, and sorely miss them. My mantra is to never sell anything, unless I absolutely have to, or unless I don't like it anymore.
Old 4th December 2017
  #26
Quote:
Originally Posted by norbury brook View Post
As a gigging/studio guitar player I'd be better served with a selection of 'newer' guitars than just one 57 strat.

Grear isn't about the 'investment' its about it's use. I have bitcoins and property in London for investment!!!

the analogy between the 57 strat and a few other more modern guitars is the same with a vintage mic, one vintage U67 isn't as useful as 6 or 7 different more 'modern' mics

I've been in this business professionally for 35 years and if I've learned anything its : it's NOT about the gear.



MC
Yeah I sold my grail gear to pay for my studio build in a modest sized church. The thing that blow's clients away is the rooms, the height of the live room, the size of the control room, My production and back catalogue. Oh and Pom's Fairchild which they think is real.
Unless they're obsessed with recording they don't care about one mic from another and that's experienced singers. I don't rent to freelance producers so it makes no odds. My mic collection is pretty serious though.
I've sincerely never looked back. I'm not in debt and I own all my gear. I don't need to float it on the stock exchange. I live off my royalties so I can be as private as I like.
I have 2 Purple MC77's, 2 Splice's and a Mohog for the price I sold 1 Blue stripe for. I am genuinely much happier with new gear but each to their own.
Old 4th December 2017
  #27
Lives for gear
 
vernier's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by norbury brook View Post
I have a lovely original 1960's U67. It's a great mic but I'm beginning to wonder if I should sell it and buy a 'modern' equivalent or 4 and go on holiday :D

Thoughts?



MC
Yep ..sell it and buy something new.
Old 5th December 2017
  #28
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjblair View Post
I think it's much bigger than 5-10%, personally. However, there were many great records made without U47s, C12s and Fairchilds. I somehow managed to make some good sounding records without that stuff, once upon a time.

I'm trying to attract clients in LA, so having a Wunder and a Beezkneez ain't gonna cut it. I have major studios to compete with. But I got into my collection for a fraction of the going rate. However, here's how I look at it: Would you sell your '57 Strat so you could buy yourself an Eric Johnson model Strat, a Schecter, a PRS, and a Gibson Custom Shop Les Paul? If the answer is yes, then you haven't done much buying and selling of vintage gear. My gear is not only a tool for my trade, it's an investment. My microphone and guitar collections have outperformed my stocks over the last 25 years by exponential amounts, with the exception of the Apple I bought a day before the iPhone was announced. Every time over the last 15 years I thought I saw the top of the mic market, it kept going. And unlike guitars, it didn't crater after 2008.

So, with that in mind, maybe ask yourself that question with a different perspective. Because I can tell you that every time I have bought a new mic, I do not get my money back out of it when I have sold it. Same with any new gear. But my vintage gear seems to always appreciate.
Yes, I was talking about using the microphones to make records, not as investments.

I invest in real estate and that's my investment niche—I can't speak to how sound your philosophy is with regard to vintage recording equipment—I suspect you have a good point there, although I also suspect that investments like that have a problem of having very slow liquidity, even slower than real estate. I have no idea how long it takes to sell a $50,000 Fairchild, but I'd have to bet it takes a minute.

And you're correct in that new gear loses value (which is why you buy it used), but I would argue that vintage gear has to be serviced and repaired more often, which contributes to a higher cost to own. And one of the standard mistakes on Gearslutz is assuming that every poster lives someplace that a tech to deal with a vintage tape machine failure or a microphone specialist is but a phone call away. Not everyone here lives in L.A., New York, London, or (to a lesser extent) Nashville.

And speaking of where you live, if the market in L.A. is such that you have to have vintage equipment to attract clients, then sure, that's a valid reason to stock vintage. But that's not the case everywhere.

I'm not a vintage gear aficionado by any means. I've heard enough of it compared to newer stuff to have the opinion that in the context of a mix it makes 5-10% difference. And some people's ears may prefer the newer stuff...when I say 5-10% difference, I don't mean that the vintage stuff is that much better...just different.

That's my experience and obviously YMMV.
Old 5th December 2017
  #29
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_G View Post
Yeah I sold my grail gear to pay for my studio build in a modest sized church. The thing that blow's clients away is the rooms, the height of the live room, the size of the control room, My production and back catalogue. Oh and Pom's Fairchild which they think is real.
Unless they're obsessed with recording they don't care about one mic from another and that's experienced singers. I don't rent to freelance producers so it makes no odds. My mic collection is pretty serious though.
I've sincerely never looked back. I'm not in debt and I own all my gear. I don't need to float it on the stock exchange. I live off my royalties so I can be as private as I like.
I have 2 Purple MC77's, 2 Splice's and a Mohog for the price I sold 1 Blue stripe for. I am genuinely much happier with new gear but each to their own.
You have much more experience than I do, but I have also come to the conclusion that there is plenty of really good, even "magical" new gear out there and I would just rather deal with something new with a warranty (or depending on what it is, slightly used). Fern, Chandler Limited, Flea, AEA, Manley, Rupert Neve, API, Bock, Horch, Arora, GML, Mercury, Retro...if you can't make a really great sounding record with what you can buy off the shelf these days, the gear's not the problem.
Old 5th December 2017
  #30
P.S. unless it's a REALLY good one check the vintage 87 vs 67 thread the guy just did. The 87 smashed it. For a 5th of the price.
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump