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How do you check the polarity of your H3000 xlr connectors?
Old 26th September 2016
  #1
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How do you check the polarity of your H3000 xlr connectors?

I'm fully aware the xlr connectors come pin 3 hot on these, but I know mine has been sent in for service by the previous owner so I'm curious as to whether they updated it to pin 2 hot. I've searched other threads and have seen all the absolute polarity discussions and stuff but can't find how to perform an xlr polarity test, on any piece of gear really. Maybe it's just my limited electronics knowledge of not knowing how to properly google my question, but can anyone help me with this?

Also, if I find it is wired pin 3 hot, how do I go about swapping pins inside the connectors? I've seen posts saying "just swap pins 2 and 3 on the connectors" but how precisely do you go about this? Has anyone actually done it on an H3000? My soldering skills are pretty solid so I'm down to give it a shot if it's possible on these. Thanks for any info,

Blake
Old 26th September 2016
  #2
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I don't understand why people get so hung up about this.
As long as the outputs and inputs of your unit are wired the same it should not matter, really.
There will be no phase issues. Am I missing something?
(P1 always has to be ground obviously).

Edit: I assume the P2/P3 scare originated from the following two scenarios:
- If you are connecting single ended or mixing devices pin swapped (like a mic or mixing console) you might get a relative phase shift.
- If you are connecting unbalanced, cold/gnd to a transformer balanced device you will not get any sound.
This should not apply to the H3000 since it is electronically balanced (no balancing transformers) and it is a processor (signal passes through).

I see this is your first post, so: Welcome!

Last edited by nednerd; 26th September 2016 at 11:28 AM..
Old 26th September 2016
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nednerd View Post
I don't understand why people get so hung up about this.
As long as the outputs and inputs of your unit are wired the same it should not matter, really..
That's correct. It doesn't matter, really.
Old 26th September 2016
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nednerd's Avatar
 

Thanks for posting, David
Old 26th September 2016
  #5
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Lumbergh's Avatar
 

Balanced sidechain connections can also cause weirdness, but again not relevant for the Harmoniser.
Old 26th September 2016
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brownhousestudio View Post
nowing how to properly google my question, but can anyone help me with this?

Also, if I find it is wired pin 3 hot, how do I go about swapping pins inside the connectors? I've seen posts saying "just swap pins 2 and 3 on the connectors" but how precisely do you go about this? Has anyone actually done it on an H3000? My soldering skills are pretty solid so I'm down to give it a shot if it's possible on these. Thanks for any info,
It's easier to create barrel connectors that flip pins (buy barrel connector, open it up and switch pin 2 and 3 internally on the wiring.) Mark what the connector does on the outside!

If you want to just fix the harmonizer, open it up, desolder and switch the wiring between pin 2 and 3. It's simple enough.
Old 26th September 2016
  #7
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Thanks guys, I've learned a lot from everyone here over the years.

This question came up because I've been doing some general studio maintenance and thought I'd take a look and use it as an opportunity to learn more about electronics in general. I've made my own cables for a long time but never opened up a piece of gear and made changes. The question still stands, even if I leave the connectors alone, how do I determine which pin is hot? This is just some general knowledge I'd like to have.

Pardon if I should've posted in Geekslutz. Gettin kinda geeky...
Old 26th September 2016
  #8
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In order to find out 100% certain what pin is wired "Hot" and what pin is wired "Cold"
on your H3000 you would have to look at the schematics and trace the I/Os of the Op amps.
David might be able to give you a pin number you can trace.

This would be a pretty academic exercise though.
The nomenclature "Hot" or "Cold" is misleading.
We are just talking about a phase shift here so it would have been better to call it "0" and "180" or "early" and "late" signal.
Old 26th September 2016
  #9
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For the outputs of your H3000 you could also use a scope to determine the pin out.
Old 27th September 2016
  #10
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iangomes's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by nednerd View Post
In order to find out 100% certain what pin is wired "Hot" and what pin is wired "Cold"
on your H3000 you would have to look at the schematics and trace the I/Os of the Op amps.
David might be able to give you a pin number you can trace.

This would be a pretty academic exercise though.
The nomenclature "Hot" or "Cold" is misleading.
We are just talking about a phase shift here so it would have been better to call it "0" and "180" or "early" and "late" signal.
Not that it's important, but phase and polarity aren't really the same thing. Early and late don't really make any sense when discussing pin 2 or pin 3 hot.
Old 27th September 2016
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iangomes View Post
Not that it's important, but phase and polarity aren't really the same thing. Early and late don't really make any sense when discussing pin 2 or pin 3 hot.
Yes, you are right and I think it is important in this context.
It is a signal inversion so picturing one signal slower than the other is misleading. Thanks for pointing that out.
Old 27th September 2016
  #12
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Hmm that does sound pretty deep. If the information shows up I'll give it a shot. If not I'll continue using it and loving it the way it's been. Thanks for the info though. Interesting how tricky that seemingly simple question would be to answer. At least without a scope, which I am indeed without.
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