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Can OTB Mixing Give You Total Recall like ITB? Audio Interfaces
Old 17th May 2016
  #1
Gear Nut
 

Can OTB Mixing Give You Total Recall like ITB?

I know there are engineers who have got rid of their consoles and now mixing totally ITB. The main reason I have heard is because of recall and if they ever need to tweak a mix they can just pull it up and tweak it vs. trying to reset everything on their console and outboard gear.

So I was wondering if there were those who still mix OTB and if so, what gear are they using for recall?

Thanks
Old 17th May 2016
  #2
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
It takes a TON of note taking, and an automated console with recall and time for said note taking and recall. Some say you never get exactly the same even if you do have all the notes and the "right" console.
Old 17th May 2016
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Motoxxx's Avatar
 

I have a console that is called "Recall" that was made by Amek years ago and even though it doesn't have motorized faders the computer takes a snapshot of the entire desk and Rupert Neve tells you where to reset each knob. It also has on board comps and gates that are instantly recalled if you choose to use them.

Since phones pretty much all have cameras these days the note taking is minimal compared to old days. I take a snapshot of the outboard gear with a label on it that says something like this example: on an 1176 "Bass>Neve EQ>RET" This means that the 1176 is inserted on the bass guitar, then through the Neve EQ and returned to the console. These pics become part of the session notes for each song. As far as hand written notes, its mostly just routing of the signal chains and whatever labels you need to write for the outboard gear. Having pics of the outboard setting and the routing listed on them makes it really fast. I can typically "chart" an entire session in less than 10 mins.
Old 18th May 2016
  #4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic Mastering View Post
I know there are engineers who have got rid of their consoles and now mixing totally ITB. The main reason I have heard is because of recall and if they ever need to tweak a mix they can just pull it up and tweak it vs. trying to reset everything on their console and outboard gear.

So I was wondering if there were those who still mix OTB and if so, what gear are they using for recall?

Thanks
Like ITB? no.

Total recall? yes. Modern desks (eg Neve VR/88RS, SSL E onwards when fitted, plus things like the Euphonix and Harrison digitally controlled analogue consoles) have recall computers that store the information for each pot/button on the console.

Then, most professional studios installed a piece of gear called an assistant engineer to take recall notes on paper sheets (see barry rudolph's website or teaboy audio) and patching notes. I think I spent most of the mid 2000s recalling mix sessions. some used photos (never liked this - too prone to labelling or parallax error).

But the consoles were only accurate to +/- .25dB (which can add up over 72 channels), people make mistakes, and analogue gear never quite recalls exactly the same. Most of the time with a few tweaks you got yourself back to somewhere you could pick up from.

But it took time. Maybe up to an hour for a complicated mix recall - manually resetting and patching every piece of gear. So that simple "can we just try the solo up a bit" could be the better part of 1/3 day once all the versions had been printed (so you don't have to recall again for the instrumental etc!). Whereas ITB is instant, and you can run stems off at a later date, and you can even just drop in on a particular part of the mix if you're really pushed for time. Hybrid mixes (eg analogue mixbuss chain) are almost as quick - a few notes and couple of patch cables and you're done.

So yeah - no it's not like ITB, yes it's possible but expensive and time consuming.
Old 18th May 2016
  #5
PS most of the time it's not "engineers getting rid of consoles" because few guys actually owned a console with total recall. They just adapted working methods so they didn't mix on the console, or stopped booking mix rooms and got their own ITB/hybrid setups.
Old 18th May 2016
  #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic Mastering View Post
I know there are engineers who have got rid of their consoles and now mixing totally ITB. The main reason I have heard is because of recall and if they ever need to tweak a mix they can just pull it up and tweak it vs. trying to reset everything on their console and outboard gear.

So I was wondering if there were those who still mix OTB and if so, what gear are they using for recall?

Thanks
Hybrid workflow. Using Analog gear that is Digitally Recallable. This is the next evolution of the workflow in audio engineering. We live in amazing times. There is more and more digitally controlled analog equipment being designed. I feel like a majority of it gets overlooked. Perhaps it is a minority of items in our world. But 4-5 years ago I was thinking this was the next huge thing in our industry. For the most part, it would speed up work, while still giving the engineer the analog signal path. I feel like more people should be working easier with it. Maybe they are now.

FWIW, I don't think taking the time to turn a few knobs [or an entire console full of em..] back to where they were set is a huge deal. Obviously -- its not that simple. But for me - it mostly is. Because I do not want or need to use all the knobs on earth. I try and anticipate it with my clients. Just as part of my job -- picking the right tools. Most Analog gear is easily recallable. Some not as much. For my clients -- I leave the mix up for a few days - a week - whatever. Just so I can walk back in there and re-twerk it. At least most gear - would allow you to get back to basic settings and adjust from there if you "wrote them down"…the old fashioned way. I dunno. This is a self imposed limit for me. I think I do better work when I push myself to "go for it" at every step of the way. In other words, there is some amount of pressure to get it right. I don't exactly enjoy endlessly tweak things into a glass case, but I have done many recalls for clients with extremely minor adjustments.

At this point in my career, I am thoroughly enjoying…Getting the F#ck out of the way of the artists intention and letting that flow through the wires into their ears. The closer I get it…the better I feel about the work I am doing. Clients are happy. Minimal Tweaking -- Sounding Human -- What more can you ask for? I feel that "Tweaks" are sometimes detrimental to the bigger picture of the music. You can easily "tweak" a song until its vibe less. Therefor I do not feel the need to spend money for "tweaking" later. I do need some ability -- With My DAW -- I have that. And I acknowledge this part of our industry -- as we are in a Service industry -- so if your client needs to recall and "tweak" over and over until satisfaction is found -- you should use something that allows that in your workflow. I am about as obsessive as you can be with the details of engineering and gear, but I find each kink in the chain, good for its own unique job.
Old 18th May 2016
  #7
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Mixwell View Post
Hybrid workflow. Using Analog gear that is Digitally Recallable. This is the next evolution of the workflow in audio engineering. We live in amazing times. There is more and more digitally controlled analog equipment being designed.
This is what I was wondering about. If developers would design great analog gear to have recallability. Consoles yes, but compressors, EQs, (etc., would be great to have that. The it would seem to be totally recallable (not just the console).

The Liquid Channel is great for that (some love it, others not so much) but for those who do, the recallability on that unit is one of the attractive features. So to me, it would be nice for all rack gear to eventually be able to have this feature as well.
Old 18th May 2016
  #8
Even for hardware inserts in Cubase, I have a send level to my hardware that I use to give me the compression I want. My mixbus comp never moves, the threshold knob points directly at the "T" in threshold and the output at the "T" in output. Everything else is stepped. I try to buy stuff that completely stepped as well like the IGS stuff. Preamps are digitally controlled on the zen and I leave notes in my sessions and templates. I have a nice sounding hybrid rig that recalls just as easily as ITB.
Old 18th May 2016
  #9
Gear Nut
 
DeyeYguy's Avatar
 

if you're into cookie cutter, same ole same ole speed, itb is the way to go, the trade offs are ITB's boring commonality of every single channel sounds exactly like the one next to it, vs OTB console channel strips NEVER sounding identical to the one next to it, which is such a GREAT thing, it sets things apart, much in the same way different microphones set things apart, these are just some of the many things that give OTB a unique character as compared to the commonality of itb mixes. ITB generally consists of everyone using the same limited amount of daws/plugs verbatim, you can own 6 1176 hardware units, and none of them will sound the same, I so enjoy spending the time digging my hands into actual gear, and loving the results over that generic ubiquitous ITB workflow, and that sound, that boring boring generic, "everyones got it" sound....
Old 18th May 2016
  #10
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jjblair's Avatar
I'm face palming so hard right now. Literally.
Old 18th May 2016
  #11
Lives for gear
 
jjblair's Avatar
Without detents on your gear, you will never be able to get a recall that will sound just like the original. This is why mastering guys love gear with detents, because they always have to go back for adjustments.

Also, there's a margin of error on motorized faders. But I tell you this much, I don't miss having to take a pile of polaroids of every channel on the console, and every piece of outboard gear.

If you work a lot, as a professional, here's my experience: Clients have come to expect frequent recalls for the most ridiculous of reasons. "That word is too loud," etc. I miss the workflow of my console. I don't miss having to do recalls, and honestly, they would not be possible in a lot of the mixes I'm doing ITB. I have learned too do ITB mixes that are exciting, dynamic, rich, full and punchy. I've had clients hear a mix, look at al the tube gear in my racks, and say, "It sound so warm and thick. Which of this stuff did you run it through?" And they almost look sad when I tell them that except for the master bus, none.

Everything has its pluses and minuses. Budgets do not allow me the time to do a console recall. My friend who does a hundreds of mixes a year on a console is always printing stems, so that he doesn't have to recall. I never, ever thought I would embrace ITB mixing, but it can be done really well.
Old 18th May 2016
  #12
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeyeYguy View Post
if you're into cookie cutter, same ole same ole...
A friend of mine loves his MGB because he loves doing the things that go into keeping it running. I think you two would get along.
Old 18th May 2016
  #13
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drumsound View Post
It takes a TON of note taking, and an automated console with recall and time for said note taking and recall. Some say you never get exactly the same even if you do have all the notes and the "right" console.
On a hot, grid-taxing LA summer day, things would sound different over the course of the same day, even if everything just sat there. Never happens ITB.
Old 18th May 2016
  #14
Gear Nut
 
DeyeYguy's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjblair View Post
I'm face palming so hard right now. Literally.
bold response...., I can see you and I are gonna get along famously

why don't you enlighten me to my misgivings?
Old 18th May 2016
  #15
Gear Guru
 
Drumsound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjblair View Post
Without detents on your gear, you will never be able to get a recall that will sound just like the original. This is why mastering guys love gear with detents, because they always have to go back for adjustments.

Also, there's a margin of error on motorized faders. But I tell you this much, I don't miss having to take a pile of polaroids of every channel on the console, and every piece of outboard gear.

If you work a lot, as a professional, here's my experience: Clients have come to expect frequent recalls for the most ridiculous of reasons. "That word is too loud," etc. I miss the workflow of my console. I don't miss having to do recalls, and honestly, they would not be possible in a lot of the mixes I'm doing ITB. I have learned too do ITB mixes that are exciting, dynamic, rich, full and punchy. I've had clients hear a mix, look at al the tube gear in my racks, and say, "It sound so warm and thick. Which of this stuff did you run it through?" And they almost look sad when I tell them that except for the master bus, none.

Everything has its pluses and minuses. Budgets do not allow me the time to do a console recall. My friend who does a hundreds of mixes a year on a console is always printing stems, so that he doesn't have to recall. I never, ever thought I would embrace ITB mixing, but it can be done really well.
That's pretty much were I am too, especially the last sentence.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
On a hot, grid-taxing LA summer day, things would sound different over the course of the same day, even if everything just sat there. Never happens ITB.
TOTALLY. Old tube gear especially. Hell, guitar amps sound VERY different on take 3 of song one than they do on take one of song 6 of the day.
Old 18th May 2016
  #16
Gear Maniac
 

Analogue Mixing

I have a MXP3036 Sony/MCI console that we mix through and actually removed the automation. We automate levels either in are RADAR STUDIO from Pro-Tools running in the RADAR Studio which has 24 Classic converters.

I just copy the project so all the track remain at the same level they were recorded and then change the levels in the copy and try to keep the console faders at unity.

If we have more than 24 tracks we either connector up the 2nd Radar or sub-mix in the box. This gives us the advantage of using Plug-ins and analogue outboard gear like our LA2's, LA4'a and 1176 compressors and other FX.

The Sony has a very clean and pristine balanced MIX BUS plu 6-AUX sends.

There are inserts on every channel where we can patch in analogue compressors or several different EQ's we have.

We can actually make fader moves also and store than on the copied project.

It seems to be the best of both worlds.

Cheers, Dave Thomas
aamicrophones.com

Last edited by microphonefolk; 18th May 2016 at 08:42 PM.. Reason: typo
Old 18th May 2016
  #17
Lives for gear
 
jjblair's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeyeYguy View Post
bold response...., I can see you and I are gonna get along famously

why don't you enlighten me to my misgivings?
Sure.

"trade offs are ITB's boring commonality of every single channel sounds exactly like the one next to it, vs OTB console channel strips NEVER sounding identical to the one next to it..."

This is what happens when you learn to record by reading a Tape Op.

If you need gear to be working out of spec in order for a make something sound good, or not boring, then you are doing it wrong. If I go to a studio, and one channel sounds unlike the other channel, that is the last time I work there. I'll book somewhere reliable next time. I don't have time to dick around and experiment and see which 1176 sounds brighter or darker or thinner or fatter than the other one, and musicians who are either in the live room waiting for me to hit the record button, or the people paying me by the hour to work on their music, should not be subjected to such behavior either.

I am on a session, I've got a bunch of union players getting paid a **** load of money, and I have to make sure that we don't go into overtime because I can't find a pair of Pultecs or two channels on the console that match. Or the client has a deadline because this mix has to be uploaded to the music supervisor in 20 minutes, and there is a **** load of money invested in all aspects of this television show, and my gear cannot be the weak link in the chain.

Oh, and how much do you want to bet that those consoles at EMI were kept up to spec, and that any of those channels were interchangeable? Yeah, because all those Beatles records sounds so boring and cookie-cutter.

Last edited by jjblair; 19th May 2016 at 01:16 AM..
Old 19th May 2016
  #18
Lives for gear
 
jjblair's Avatar
Oh, and when they bounced tracks on the Beatles records? They always went through the same compressor, so it was literally the same thing on all the instruments! BORING!!!!!
Old 19th May 2016
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Mixwell View Post
Hybrid workflow. Using Analog gear that is Digitally Recallable. This is the next evolution of the workflow in audio engineering. We live in amazing times. There is more and more digitally controlled analog equipment being designed. I feel like a majority of it gets overlooked. Perhaps it is a minority of items in our world. But 4-5 years ago I was thinking this was the next huge thing in our industry. For the most part, it would speed up work, while still giving the engineer the analog signal path. I feel like more people should be working easier with it. Maybe they are now.

FWIW, I don't think taking the time to turn a few knobs [or an entire console full of em..] back to where they were set is a huge deal. Obviously -- its not that simple. But for me - it mostly is. Because I do not want or need to use all the knobs on earth. I try and anticipate it with my clients. Just as part of my job -- picking the right tools. Most Analog gear is easily recallable. Some not as much. For my clients -- I leave the mix up for a few days - a week - whatever. Just so I can walk back in there and re-twerk it. At least most gear - would allow you to get back to basic settings and adjust from there if you "wrote them down"…the old fashioned way. I dunno. This is a self imposed limit for me. I think I do better work when I push myself to "go for it" at every step of the way. In other words, there is some amount of pressure to get it right. I don't exactly enjoy endlessly tweak things into a glass case, but I have done many recalls for clients with extremely minor adjustments.

At this point in my career, I am thoroughly enjoying…Getting the F#ck out of the way of the artists intention and letting that flow through the wires into their ears. The closer I get it…the better I feel about the work I am doing. Clients are happy. Minimal Tweaking -- Sounding Human -- What more can you ask for? I feel that "Tweaks" are sometimes detrimental to the bigger picture of the music. You can easily "tweak" a song until its vibe less. Therefor I do not feel the need to spend money for "tweaking" later. I do need some ability -- With My DAW -- I have that. And I acknowledge this part of our industry -- as we are in a Service industry -- so if your client needs to recall and "tweak" over and over until satisfaction is found -- you should use something that allows that in your workflow. I am about as obsessive as you can be with the details of engineering and gear, but I find each kink in the chain, good for its own unique job.
It's about finding an approach that works for you, sure. But leaving a mix up for a week? That's 2 months + to mix an album...I frequently work on 3 mixes a day (one mix plus 2 recalls). You can't make a living doing a mix a week, nor would you keep many clients. A label will generally expect the mix, then changes when they request them.

That's why many people are abandoning consoles and going hybrid/itb. Plus of course, some (me included) feel we do better work if we can revisit and touch up things that jump out after a few days.
Old 19th May 2016
  #20
Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
It's about finding an approach that works for you, sure. But leaving a mix up for a week? That's 2 months + to mix an album...I frequently work on 3 mixes a day (one mix plus 2 recalls). You can't make a living doing a mix a week, nor would you keep many clients. A label will generally expect the mix, then changes when they request them.

That's why many people are abandoning consoles and going hybrid/itb. Plus of course, some (me included) feel we do better work if we can revisit and touch up things that jump out after a few days.
Just my workflow, I have no problem leaving my gear setup for a week. I have other gigs, freelance engineer work, consulting. I do not primarily "mix" to make a living. If I did, I would not have half the gear i use. I primarly mix my own work. Not others.
Old 19th May 2016
  #21
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeyeYguy View Post
if you're into cookie cutter, same ole same ole speed, itb is the way to go, the trade offs are ITB's boring commonality of every single channel sounds exactly like the one next to it, vs OTB console channel strips NEVER sounding identical to the one next to it, which is such a GREAT thing, it sets things apart, much in the same way different microphones set things apart, these are just some of the many things that give OTB a unique character as compared to the commonality of itb mixes. ITB generally consists of everyone using the same limited amount of daws/plugs verbatim, you can own 6 1176 hardware units, and none of them will sound the same, I so enjoy spending the time digging my hands into actual gear, and loving the results over that generic ubiquitous ITB workflow, and that sound, that boring boring generic, "everyones got it" sound....
Everything you mention is down to the individual's approach. This way of working might influence you or people you know this way, but don't assume it applies to everyone - particularly those who have transitioned from working otb at a high level.

That'd be like me suggesting people working in limited otb setups lack attention to detail - because that's how it affects me.
Old 19th May 2016
  #22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Mixwell View Post
Just my workflow, I have no problem leaving my gear setup for a week. I have other gigs, freelance engineer work, consulting. I do not primarily "mix" to make a living. If I did, I would not have half the gear i use. I primarly mix my own work. Not others.
Exactly - what suits for one user and workflow won't work for someone else.

Anyone working commercially couldn't take this route. In fact, the few times recently I've had work mixed by those mixing for a living but on smaller OTB setups, it's been frustrating. They simply can't do the tweaks requested. One particular guy did a very average first mix (flat and uninspired, ironically "2D" for want of a better term despite the oodles of lovely analogue gear - I was expecting it to be too soupy and thick!), and simply refused the initial list of tweaks, saying he was out! Eventually persuaded to revisit and the remix (pretty much from scratch) was better - but still the final result about 70% of what I'd expect. Needless to say, I don't think he'll be mixing further tracks.

Of course if your primary client is yourself, that's not an issue
Old 19th May 2016
  #23
Lives for gear
 
Motoxxx's Avatar
 

Once I have a mix finished up I'll print all tracks back into the DAW so that all of the consoles setting are stored as processed digital. That at least makes pulling the exact mix back up much easier. Then do any changes in the DAW and if you need to import any of the raw audio files back in to edit its right there. Easy Cheesey baby!
Old 19th May 2016
  #24
Lives for gear
 

Recall is a tricky subject for Engineers. Ideally the client is buying what you bring to the table. If you have recalls then there is an assumption you have not done your job (which we know is likely false for many reasons). The more recalls that happen (or if it's being done by commitee at the label), the less value you have as a mixer and instead become an equipment operator for others. So really recall very much defines whether your role is as mixer or that as an operator. This is not to demean the role of operator but is simply stating a fact that it is a separate role. It's best to define your role definition BEFORE work starts with frank questions and discussion with any possible client. If you are to be an operator where many recalls will likely happen then push the project into ITB land to maximize your time and profit, making sure ALL of your time is paid for (the many recall client likely will be looking for what they can get away with for the lowest cost). If they want the sonics of OTB/Hybrid and it looks like your role will be as operator then charge accordingly explaining the pros and cons of analog workflow (analog recall will cost extra as more time is involved - common sense explainations like "most analog outboard has no automatic recall settings whatsoever" will make it easy for the client to understand why there is a cost increase). Remember time equals money as we are really selling our time. If your role is mixer then make it financially unatractive to later second guess your creative role, changing your role to operator (make extra recalls very expensive). Operators are more interchangable than mixers and pricing should reflect that (you should get a premium for your creativity as there is only one of you), market forces will also shape that too (big names are paid big bucks for their creativity and charge a hefty premium to be second guessed).

There is nothing wrong with being defined as either a mixer or an operator. Sometimes you are creating, sometimes you are the monkey behind the controls following orders. Just figure out what your role is before starting and charge accordingly, that way there will be less ego involved and hopefully pleased clients. Bottom line is that you are selling your time regardless of what role you play, just get paid accordingly.
Old 19th May 2016
  #25
I get what you're saying, but generally it doesn't really work like this. Most clients don't care what you're using - they just want the results, and they want the options. You need to be able to supply both.

The best guys can so they get the gigs. The guy that makes his own terms ("I work like this, I only do one recall, I don't print stems" etc) better be amazing because most clients won't put up with that!

The "mixer vs operator" argument - I get what you're saying but it doesn't really work like that. Someone has to be the driving force, other can have input and usually that can improve the whole, or at least please the client, but it doesn't reduce the mix engineer to a button pusher.

I've never been asked what gear I use by a major label client. They only care about results. I've had what I use dictated by one client only - I politely declined the gig after hearing his material.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassmankr View Post
Recall is a tricky subject for Engineers. Ideally the client is buying what you bring to the table. If you have recalls then there is an assumption you have not done your job (which we know is likely false for many reasons). The more recalls that happen (or if it's being done by commitee at the label), the less value you have as a mixer and instead become an equipment operator for others. So really recall very much defines whether your role is as mixer or that as an operator. This is not to demean the role of operator but is simply stating a fact that it is a separate role. It's best to define your role definition BEFORE work starts with frank questions and discussion with any possible client. If you are to be an operator where many recalls will likely happen then push the project into ITB land to maximize your time and profit, making sure ALL of your time is paid for (the many recall client likely will be looking for what they can get away with for the lowest cost). If they want the sonics of OTB/Hybrid and it looks like your role will be as operator then charge accordingly explaining the pros and cons of analog workflow (analog recall will cost extra as more time is involved - common sense explainations like "most analog outboard has no automatic recall settings whatsoever" will make it easy for the client to understand why there is a cost increase). Remember time equals money as we are really selling our time. If your role is mixer then make it financially unatractive to later second guess your creative role, changing your role to operator (make extra recalls very expensive). Operators are more interchangable than mixers and pricing should reflect that (you should get a premium for your creativity as there is only one of you), market forces will also shape that too (big names are paid big bucks for their creativity and charge a hefty premium to be second guessed).

There is nothing wrong with being defined as either a mixer or an operator. Sometimes you are creating, sometimes you are the monkey behind the controls following orders. Just figure out what your role is before starting and charge accordingly, that way there will be less ego involved and hopefully pleased clients. Bottom line is that you are selling your time regardless of what role you play, just get paid accordingly.
Old 19th May 2016
  #26
Lives for gear
 

Although you do need to be able to do both roles it's figuring out what role(s) you will be playing along with client budget that define how much time is involved and therefore proper pricing and time management. While your client may not ask what workflow / gear is involved and is indeed concerned with the end results, you certainly need to know this or you will be working for $2 an hour when you calculate what you were paid vs. actual hours expended. If your hourly rate reflects either role that's fine but the guys getting the big bucks are selling their creativity and building their brand value with high recall costs. We have to deal with "perceived value" in the mind of the client regardless of how many recalls happen. Unless you are already a big name with pricing to reflect it then the more recalls, the less perceived value you have. That's just how market forces work with all tradesmen.
Old 19th May 2016
  #27
Lives for gear
 

I started on analog boards and tape machines. After ten years of ITB producing, recording, and mixing, I'm back to an analog console with total recall and automation. I primarily use it for summing when mixing ( I don't have much outboard) but the EQ isn't bad and every knob, switch and fader is recallable.

I find that I can work either way (ITB or OTB) but this hybrid approach works for me. Using the DAW for effects, automation, and sub-grouping and the board for summing is probably the best way I've worked.

It's nice to put hands on actual audio faders and it's also nice to have a place to plug in drum machines and keyboards without needing to turn a computer on. My next step is a decent 2 track recorder to mix to so I don't have to route the master buss back into Pro Tools.
Old 19th May 2016
  #28
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jjblair's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by L-Fire View Post
My next step is a decent 2 track recorder to mix to so I don't have to route the master buss back into Pro Tools.
L-Fire, buy a Korg DSD. I can't remember the last time I turned on my ATR102.
Old 19th May 2016
  #29
Lives for gear
 

I find the best way is to print the channels back into Pro tools. Does not take long, and is 99% there - stero bus has all de-tented gear so some quick scribbles in the session notes.
Old 19th May 2016
  #30
Quote:
Originally Posted by L-Fire View Post
I started on analog boards and tape machines. After ten years of ITB producing, recording, and mixing, I'm back to an analog console with total recall and automation. I primarily use it for summing when mixing ( I don't have much outboard) but the EQ isn't bad and every knob, switch and fader is recallable.

I find that I can work either way (ITB or OTB) but this hybrid approach works for me. Using the DAW for effects, automation, and sub-grouping and the board for summing is probably the best way I've worked.

It's nice to put hands on actual audio faders and it's also nice to have a place to plug in drum machines and keyboards without needing to turn a computer on. My next step is a decent 2 track recorder to mix to so I don't have to route the master buss back into Pro Tools.
What's wrong with printing back into the session?! It's the easiest way to get stems etc down.
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