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What do you big mixers hate?
Old 30th January 2007
  #31
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espasonico's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kris View Post
If I'm not mistaken the problem can arise when you consolidate that track... The auto Fade in/outs don't consolidate... therefore the new track can be full of pops/clicks... If it's not consolidated, no problemo.
Yes, you are not mistaken. Lots of people don´t know that option and consolidate and then wonder why they get some clicks. Then they trash the DAE prefs.

Even me sometimes I forget but fortunatly I realise soon enough for cancelling the consolidation

I´m an idiot heh
Old 30th January 2007
  #32
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jfw3 View Post
Almost all of these problems that have been addressed here can be taken care of with communication. When you have a new client, simply send them a PDF file that has your mix guidelines.
OK.. but how do you get them to actually READ your pdf file.. The ones that drive you crazy usually don't bother..
Communication travels both ways so if nothing is coming back to you, it just ends.

BTW Cool topic.
Old 30th January 2007
  #33
Gear Addict
 
jfw3's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by anseo View Post
OK.. but how do you get them to actually READ your pdf file.. The ones that drive you crazy usually don't bother..
Communication travels both ways so if nothing is coming back to you, it just ends.

BTW Cool topic.
Unfortunately, you cannot make someone do that. The file I send out is on 1 page, and is a bullet-point style presentation. Very simple to follow and an easy read. I talk to them on the phone before they send the sessions and stress the necessity of not only reading it, but following what it says.
Old 30th January 2007
  #34
Gear Maniac
Quote:
Originally Posted by espasonico View Post
What I hate most is when missing audiofiles because af a dick allocation problem.

I can deal with nearly everything but I can´t mix files that I don´t have
That's not just a mixing issue, my friend...

Michael
Old 30th January 2007
  #35
Gear Nut
 

wow after all this I just feel sick. We aren't mixers we are turd polishers.
Old 30th January 2007
  #36
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drundall's Avatar
 

I'm getting tired of "Audio 1, Audio 2, etc."
Remember track sheets? How cool would it be if you wrote "track 1, track 2, etc"? You'd probably be flamed over the phone real hard.
Old 30th January 2007
  #37
mds
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Quote:
Originally Posted by espasonico View Post
If you experience some clicks and the regions are not faded, what I use is the "Automatic fade in out region" option in PT preferences. Many people use it instead of doing 1000s fades. I also use it in most cases set at 1ms and works great if you are not working with regions with beats ( kicks and that stuff )
Good advice, but I've run into it with a loop that was printed to a full length track, so I have to cut it all up into regions anyways for the auto-fade thing to work, so I just do it while I'm going...kinda of a drag, especially if there are a lot of looped parts in a song that all have bad cuts in them!

Mike
Old 30th January 2007
  #38
mds
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jfw3 View Post
Unfortunately, you cannot make someone do that. The file I send out is on 1 page, and is a bullet-point style presentation. Very simple to follow and an easy read. I talk to them on the phone before they send the sessions and stress the necessity of not only reading it, but following what it says.
Definitely a good idea...sometimes I get mix gigs where the tracks were done long before I was hired to mix, so the client can only do so much without reworking a lot of their tracks...I usually give them the "I'll make the best of what we have," but make sure they know that some things just aren't going to be perfect if the tracks have significant flaws...
Old 30th January 2007
  #39
mds
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RACKMAN View Post
wow after all this I just feel sick. We aren't mixers we are turd polishers.
That is the case a lot of the time...I try to do it in two phases. First, polish every turd in sight, then get some coffee, beer, and/or sleep, then mix. The upside is you really get to know the parts and the song while you're up to your neck in turd. I find the mix starts coming together in my head just from familiarity with the song. By the time I sit down to put it together I have a really good idea of what needs to happen...
Old 30th January 2007
  #40
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Protools Guy's Avatar
 

Just to add one: Vocals (and drums) cut in a room where the drywall slap butchers any chance of sonic quality.
Old 31st January 2007
  #41
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absrec's Avatar
 

I agree with all of the above posts, especially the ones about getting bad edits and tracks names "Audio 1", "Audio 2",etc.

Another one is people that have unrealistic expectations of their stuff. You know, the drum tracks that were recorded in a 70's style shag carpet room with drums that are stuffed with laundry and the band tells you they want them to sound like Led Zeppelin!

Or, the guitar tracks that come in sounding like a mosquito and the band wants them to sound like Audioslave!

-Aaron
Old 31st January 2007
  #42
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Tone Laborer's Avatar
I have to deal with many of those issues when I mix a song.

Then I remember I was also the tracking engineer.
Old 31st January 2007
  #43
Gear Maniac
 
Jackie Treehorn's Avatar
 

Nice topic.

Probably some time this summer, I will be handing off material to be mixed for my first-ever album... so this is very timely information for me. A lot of your preferences are intuitive (crossfades, labeling regions, etc.), but this was still helpful to read.

Let me ask you guys a few questions: Are the mixers in this thread unanimous in their desire to get tracks with no volume edits? I've spent a lot of time doing just that on a couple of different tracks of mine. For example, I have a couple of songs where the lead vocal is singing the last line of a verse or chorus (often of paramount importance to the meaning of the song) when a guitar solo (or a string part, etc.) plays a few "pickup" notes to the next section of the song (a bridge, a guitar solo, etc.). I thought I was doing the mix engineer a favor by carefully volume-editing both regions to give the vocal a slight "lift" and subtly shaving a few dB from the competing instrument.

So did I waste my time? I'm not presuming to be better at all of this than a mixing engineer, but I thought I was helping them. . . at least give them a starting point that sounds "right" to my ears.

Also, say for a fade at the end of a song, where some instruments die quickly and others (e.g. electric bass) sustain forever. . . again, I tried to carefully fade each region so that there is some uniformity in the overall sound at the end of the song ---- some fades start a bit sooner than others, etc. I did make the decay a bit slower (the final note or chord last longer) than I thought it should be. . . in other words, I made the last note last longer than it should .... so ultimately the engineers could cut it off as they see fit.

Would the mix engineers rather do this themselves?

Another thing: No plug-ins whatsoever?
For reverbs, compressors, EQ's, etc. that makes sense to me. . . but say, a gate on the lead vocal track?

I'm going to post some more questions for you all when I get a chance.

Thanks for the thread!
Old 31st January 2007
  #44
Lives for gear
I don't have little things...

what I "hate" is more GLOBAL.

I hate it when no rough mix or balance of the track has EVER sounded the way the band or producer wants it to sound, but they still EXPECT the mix to sound like whatever THAT is.
Even though there's really NO evidence that sound is recorded.

it's MIXING.

not re-recording.
not remedial recording.
not rearranging.
not miracle performing or mind reading...

MIXING.
Old 31st January 2007
  #45
Lives for Jesus
 
stevep's Avatar
Good questions

Quote:
Let me ask you guys a few questions: Are the mixers in this thread unanimous in their desire to get tracks with volume edits? I've spent a lot of time doing just that on a couple of different tracks of mine.
I would rather have the original tracks

Thats what automation is for

Quote:
Also, say for a fade at the end of a song, where some instruments die quickly and others (e.g. electric bass) sustain forever. . . again, I tried to carefully fade each region so that there is some uniformity in the overall sound at the end of the song ----
i would rather have the original length without any fades

Quote:
Another thing: No plug-ins whatsoever?
For reverbs, compressors, EQ's, etc. that makes sense to me. . . but say, a gate on the lead vocal track?

No plugins for me please




Old 31st January 2007
  #46
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paterno's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackie Treehorn View Post
Let me ask you guys a few questions: Are the mixers in this thread unanimous in their desire to get tracks with no volume edits? I've spent a lot of time doing just that on a couple of different tracks of mine. For example, I have a couple of songs where the lead vocal is singing the last line of a verse or chorus (often of paramount importance to the meaning of the song) when a guitar solo (or a string part, etc.) plays a few "pickup" notes to the next section of the song (a bridge, a guitar solo, etc.). I thought I was doing the mix engineer a favor by carefully volume-editing both regions to give the vocal a slight "lift" and subtly shaving a few dB from the competing instrument.

So did I waste my time? I'm not presuming to be better at all of this than a mixing engineer, but I thought I was helping them. . . at least give them a starting point that sounds "right" to my ears.
Well, yes and no. Remember, any moves you are making are relative/relevant to the monitor mix you are using to make the moves. Change the sounds around it, like a mixer will do, and your moves -- especially the subtle ones, will be lost or make no sense in the context of a new mix. So instead of fighting the fact that I can't freely move faders since there is automation written on them, starting from a blank slate is the way to go.

Now, if you provide the best mix you can to the person you are passing it onto, you are giving the best representation of your vision for the song as possible, which is never a bad thing.

If you do something that you feel is very important, just print it --with the automation moves -- to another track and have the mixer use that one for the mix. At least you'll know that it has, already built in, the moves you think need to be there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackie Treehorn View Post
Also, say for a fade at the end of a song, where some instruments die quickly and others (e.g. electric bass) sustain forever. . . again, I tried to carefully fade each region so that there is some uniformity in the overall sound at the end of the song ---- some fades start a bit sooner than others, etc. I did make the decay a bit slower (the final note or chord last longer) than I thought it should be. . . in other words, I made the last note last longer than it should .... so ultimately the engineers could cut it off as they see fit.

Would the mix engineers rather do this themselves?
Get it close, but leave room, like you are saying, for the final fade. just clean up the things that are really standing out, and let the master fade take care of the rest.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackie Treehorn View Post
Another thing: No plug-ins whatsoever?
For reverbs, compressors, EQ's, etc. that makes sense to me. . . but say, a gate on the lead vocal track?
NO !!!! A gate on a lead vocal track? Not to be a smart ass, but a gate on a lead vocal track for the most part doesn't make any sense to me. This is my 'lead vocal' exception -- If for some reason it is integral to the song, print a version of the track with the plugin [as I mentioned above with the automation], and maybe give it to the mixer as an alt.

If the plugin is an integral part of the sound, print the sound with the plugin and give it to the mixer that way. If you are not sure, then it is probably not as integral as you think...

Cheers,
John
Old 31st January 2007
  #47
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Soldier777c's Avatar
 

I'm no big mix engineer by any means, but here's my contribution:

1. Producers who are finishing the track at another location, doing several last minute overdubs that you are oblivious to and won't be given to integrate until the mix is nearly done.

2. 5,000 tracks of the same exact overdriven guitar tone playing the same exact part that should merely be two tracks of a stereo double.

3. Word clock error pops and hisses on a track that were overlooked.

4. A stereo double with two noticeably different tones that weren't intended to blatantly contrast.

5. Synth bass that has been stacked with a second synth bass (same part) and combined/blended together into one file so that there is phase cancellation in the low end and/or blatant dropout of roundness.

6. Heavy distorted guitars run through 20 dB+ of unnecessary compression serving no purpose whatsoever but to suck the life out of the parts.
Old 31st January 2007
  #48
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djui5's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackie Treehorn View Post
Are the mixers in this thread unanimous in their desire to get tracks with no volume edits? I've spent a lot of time doing just that on a couple of different tracks of mine. For example, I have a couple of songs where the lead vocal is singing the last line of a verse or chorus (often of paramount importance to the meaning of the song) when a guitar solo (or a string part, etc.) plays a few "pickup" notes to the next section of the song (a bridge, a guitar solo, etc.). I thought I was doing the mix engineer a favor by carefully volume-editing both regions to give the vocal a slight "lift" and subtly shaving a few dB from the competing instrument.
In a case like this it would be ok with me. What I would ask is to receive the session with volume automation, then I would adjust as necessary. Normally I prefer to have consolidated .wav files and I'll do the work from there.

Quote:
at least give them a starting point that sounds "right" to my ears.
Regardless of the above, always send a "rough mix" of what you want the song to sound like. You can include your volume adjustments in this, and note it in the mix notes.

Quote:
Also, say for a fade at the end of a song, where some instruments die quickly and others (e.g. electric bass) sustain forever. . . again, I tried to carefully fade each region so that there is some uniformity in the overall sound at the end of the song ---- some fades start a bit sooner than others, etc. I did make the decay a bit slower (the final note or chord last longer) than I thought it should be. . . in other words, I made the last note last longer than it should .... so ultimately the engineers could cut it off as they see fit.
This would be fine with me as it's more part of the production than the mix, and less work I have to do

Quote:
Another thing: No plug-ins whatsoever?
For reverbs, compressors, EQ's, etc. that makes sense to me. . . but say, a gate on the lead vocal track?

Not unless it is a vital part of the sound of an instrument, like a filter effect on a track, or something of that sort. In this case I ask the effect be printed to a new track. As for basic mixing stuff like gates/comps/eq's etc, I request they be taken off.
Old 31st January 2007
  #49
mds
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wwittman View Post
I don't have little things...

what I "hate" is more GLOBAL.

I hate it when no rough mix or balance of the track has EVER sounded the way the band or producer wants it to sound, but they still EXPECT the mix to sound like whatever THAT is.
Even though there's really NO evidence that sound is recorded.

it's MIXING.

not re-recording.
not remedial recording.
not rearranging.
not miracle performing or mind reading...

MIXING.

WORD! :D
Old 31st January 2007
  #50
Gear Nut
 

Please listen to each individual track soloed all the way through after your consolidation. Please no more pops and clicks that you never heard before I had to waist my time pointing them out to you. I also ask for waves consolidated from 1. This makes everything fool proof. {well maybe}
Old 31st January 2007
  #51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jackie Treehorn View Post
For example, I have a couple of songs where the lead vocal is singing the last line of a verse or chorus (often of paramount importance to the meaning of the song) when a guitar solo (or a string part, etc.) plays a few "pickup" notes to the next section of the song (a bridge, a guitar solo, etc.). I thought I was doing the mix engineer a favor by carefully volume-editing both regions to give the vocal a slight "lift" and subtly shaving a few dB from the competing instrument.
(SNIP)
Another thing: No plug-ins whatsoever?
For reverbs, compressors, EQ's, etc. that makes sense to me. . . but say, a gate on the lead vocal track?
The level ride you mention just sounds like mixing to me. The only time you should include level adjustments is if it's a special case where it's a non-intuitive effect that is very important to your creative vision. This also applies to plug-ins. The gate is a bad idea, but if you had an intro with a really wierd effect on the bass that you wanted to keep, then print it through the plug-in to a new track so the mixer has it as an audio file. These special cases are great, but just plugs and rides in general applications should be left off.

The other point is that things that are especially important to you can be put in notes. Write a note to the mixer that lets him know that the vocal at that point you mention above is very important to you and you wanted to make sure to call his attention to it. Communication is a good thing. Don't drown him in paperwork, but tell him the things that you really care about.
Old 31st January 2007
  #52
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tone Laborer View Post
I have to deal with many of those issues when I mix a song.

Then I remember I was also the tracking engineer.
lol
i do that too,
i tend to put off major editing and cleanup until later in order to keep sessions moving along, i guess i figure whith a bunch a musicians waiting to play, they dont want to watch me make a billion fades and make sure it smells good.
Old 31st January 2007
  #53
Lives for gear
 
numrologst's Avatar
Wow some of you guys are pretty picky about what you get sent to you... I'm more picky on the tracking side. If i track something, I am anal. but usually make no demands, just suggestions.

As far as mixing goes... My only rule is that i get consolidated files... If the fades are key to the song, the should be performed before i get them. But they gotta be good.

It seems like alot of you guys are dealing with some pretty ****ty tracking engineers/producers.... Alot of the stuff said is a no-brainer.

If you are getting ****ty tracks, bad performances, noise, bad edits... You gotta deal with it...

As far as I am concerned, when I am given something to mix, i am working for the band/label... They are paying me to do a job... If that requires me to polish turds then fine, that's my job and that's what i get paid to do... And if it is really bad, i will not associate myself with that band/produver/engineer anymore.

At the end of the day, someone has to pay for me to operate my studio and to live. If i get garbage, and i cant turn it into something nice... I either roll with it if i need the money and use a pen name for my credits, and make the band/label sign an agreement that they will not use my likeness in promotion of the album/songs.

But I've had many projects where I get a nice fat deposit... I get the tracks and they blow... I do my best, deliver their product and laugh all the way to the bank... Afterall when you are making $500/day to mix there isn't much room to complain about anything.
Old 31st January 2007
  #54
Quote:
Originally Posted by numrologst View Post
It seems like alot of you guys are dealing with some pretty ****ty tracking engineers/producers.... Alot of the stuff said is a no-brainer.
It's amazing how the quality of tracks has suffered over the years. With the plethora of banjo mart gear out there, sometimes it's a home studio, so you cut a little slack for a guy who isn't an engineer cutting tracks in his kitchen. Still, it introduces new problems that we didn't have to deal with in decades past. Other times it's just the fact that many engineers are so used to dealing with synths, samplers, and MPCs, that they just don't have much experience with serious acoustic tracking, or experience listening to real instruments in real spaces to know what they are suppsoed to sound like. Also, mixing and producing are the "get-the-girls" kind of gigs, and people are taking less pride in tracking, and there are less quality mentoring opportunities.

It's shocking how bad the tracks are sometimes that I get from engineers with some credits and from really big studios. I'm talking major L.A. rooms booking at $2000+ per day, and engineers who supposedly have made records before. You get tracks and are just dumfounded sometimes. Luckily, not always.
Old 31st January 2007
  #55
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espasonico's Avatar
 

In an ideal world I would just ask for consolidated tracks and nothing else but it´s scary to me to ask some people to consolidate because many times you get surprises and it´s harder to fix them.

I don´t mind volume edits because thats what I check first. I like to be able to have a look at the volume curves just in case they make sense, specially if they are done to match levels between takes or punches. IF they seem to make sense, I leave them but clear the rest of them.

It´s great when people that you trust send you a PT session because you know everything it´s gonna be perfect but there are a lot of people that I don´t trust so I prefer them to do nothing because usually it´s worst if they try to consolidate or tune or whatever.

Life it ain´t perfect
Old 31st January 2007
  #56
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paterno's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by numrologst View Post
Wow some of you guys are pretty picky about what you get sent to you... I'm more picky on the tracking side. If i track something, I am anal. but usually make no demands, just suggestions.

As far as mixing goes... My only rule is that i get consolidated files... If the fades are key to the song, the should be performed before i get them. But they gotta be good.

It seems like alot of you guys are dealing with some pretty ****ty tracking engineers/producers.... Alot of the stuff said is a no-brainer.

If you are getting ****ty tracks, bad performances, noise, bad edits... You gotta deal with it...
The question was 'What do you big mixers hate?' Someone asked, and some of us are answering.

And although some of this seems no-brainer, it is pretty amazing what shows up in the session sometimes...

What we hate and what we have to deal with are two very different things. And we seem to have some common issues -- like bad fades, that seem to frustrate all of us. Other things, like receiving consolidated files, are points some of us don't agree with...

Dealing with it, and dealing with it well, is why we get paid.

JP
Old 31st January 2007
  #57
Quote:
Originally Posted by paterno View Post
Dealing with it, and dealing with it well, is why we get paid.

JP
John,

I remember when variations of the phrase above ended differently.

"That's why we get paid the big bucks."

I notice that now it has changed to just "we get paid." And sometimes even that is iffy.

It's a sign of the times.
Old 31st January 2007
  #58
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paterno's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn Fuston View Post
John,

I remember when variations of the phrase above ended differently.

"That's why we get paid the big bucks."

I notice that now it has changed to just "we get paid." And sometimes even that is iffy.

It's a sign of the times.
Good point, Lynn.

But to be honest, even though I've been at it for 16 years now, I feel like I'm very fortunate to be able to get paid at all for doing this, let alone paid well -- which can still happen occasionally.

Someone once told me 'never take a gig just for the money'. The one or two times I have were some of my worst recording experiences ever.

Last week I 'witnessed' one of the best vocal takes I've recorded in the last five years. One take, and it was stunning. Whether or not people notice it when it sees the light of day, it is still a reminder of why I got into this in the first place...

Sorry, off on a tangent, but even with all the challenges I still dig making records.

Cheers,
John
Old 31st January 2007
  #59
Lives for gear
 
djui5's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by numrologst View Post
Wow some of you guys are pretty picky about what you get sent to you.
Not really. If this stuff isn't in order we have to deal with it, which takes away from mixing. Also it changes your frame of mind from mixing the song to fixing all the issues before hand. Some guys have assistants that deal with this stuff, but not all of us are that lucky. Some of us do all the studio work ourselves...everything.

Quote:
It seems like alot of you guys are dealing with some pretty ****ty tracking engineers/producers.... Alot of the stuff said is a no-brainer.
umm..not really.

Quote:
If you are getting ****ty tracks, bad performances, noise, bad edits... You gotta deal with it...
Yeah, dealing with it by sorting it out before the session starts, and making sure you get send what you need, not some disoriented mess you'll spend half a day cleaning up before you can start. You can either deal with it before hand, or deal with it right before mixing. I don't know about you, but when I get files I like to dive into mixing, not spend half a day fixing edits and renaming tracks...stuff that should have been done before sending out the files. There is actually PDF's with standards for this kinda thing. Look up the P&E wing of the Grammy's.

Quote:
But I've had many projects where I get a nice fat deposit... I get the tracks and they blow... I do my best, deliver their product and laugh all the way to the bank... Afterall when you are making $500/day to mix there isn't much room to complain about anything.


You sound really cocky....best of luck with your career.
Old 1st February 2007
  #60
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Absolute's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
HERE ARE SOME GUIDELINES THAT I EXPECT!

*These instructions MUST be followed exactly

*Matt mixes from Pro Tools HD 7.X 24 Bit


{General Guidelines}


1. I will accept SCSI External, Firewire hard drives & CDRs/DVDRs. I do not accept 24 track analog or 48 track digital tapes. If your project is one of these formats, YOU MUST DO THE TRANSFER.
2. To help insure no delays on the scheduled mix day or days, it is essential that the Pro Tools files are received 24 hours prior to the mixing session. If they are not at MT Studios 24 hours in advance, the songs or songs will not be mixed and you will be charged for that day.
3. An audio CD of the latest “Rough Mix” must be sent along with the Pro Tools files. If the “Rough Mix” and the Pro Tools files don’t match exactly, a brief note should be sent along explaining the difference (i.e. “The song was re-sung” or “We redid drums”); if this is the case, please make a new “Rough Mix” CD. The reason for this is if the arrangement is different and no explanation is given, I start to question whether or not I have the correct session.

The following instructions are to be passed along to your Pro Tools engineer.

{Tech guidelines}

1. Managing a session: Only one session should be sent for each title. It should be labeled as “(Song title) For MT. No other sessions should be included. It should be notated clearly and correctly so there is no misunderstanding what a part is. PARTS THAT ARE NOT USED SHOULD BE DELETED. Not hidden, but deleted. Hidden tracks will be deleted by me. This also includes play lists not being used. DELETE THEM (The number one reason for HUGE files is all the unused play lists). It is very easy to clean out a session and then “Save Session Copy In” checking the “All Audio Files” box to save a new session and audio files. Make sure you “Delete Unused Regions” from the session first so they don’t take up disk space in the new session. Make sure that you open up this session and that there are no missing audio files (If audio files are missing, whether they are being used or not, I will question the validity of the entire session).
2. Automation & Plug INS: Record any effects that are part of the songs integrity. For example, a guitar going through “Amp Farm” or a Telephone Vox” Efx. Label it then save the original and make sure you CLEARLY LABEL that it was unaffected sound in the note page. Once this has been done REMOVE ALL PLUG INS.

All automation should be removed from the session. Disabling the master automation is not what we mean. Delete any and all volume moves, mutes, automated plug INS, and act. From the individual channels.

3. Track Labeling: Since there is no standard for this, I ask you to spend some time and label the instruments so that there is no guessing what they are. I can’t tell you how many times I have gotten tracks labeled in “hieroglyphics”.

Vocals- Lead Vocal should be marked as such: “Ld Vx” not “John Vocal 2”. The same for vocal doubles- “Ld Vx Dbl”.

Instruments- Notate the main instruments as such: i.e. “Main Gtr”, not “Joey SG6” (add the suffix “L” or “R” if there is a pair of them). Including the section that they play is also helpful, i.e. “Brdg Pad”, not “Virus” (This is the pad that ONLY play in the bridge).

Drums- Unless there are more than one mic on any drum or room, I don’t need to know what the mic is, rather what the sound is (If you must leave the mic info, put it on the note page).

Bass Drum- “Kik” add the suffix “Inside” or “Outside” if applicable.
Snare Drum- “Snr” add the suffix “Top” or “Btm” if applicable.

Alternate Instrumentation

I know that it is impossible to make ALL the decisions before the mix, so if there are questionable parts that you may or may not want to use, these should have “?” in front of them i.e. “Brdg Gtr Line”. I will use my discretion on whether these will be used.

With all instruments, any note in the comment boxes is helpful.

www.bluethumbproductions.com

Love your posts..always enjoy them. except this one. haha

No matter what your business is..there should not be demanding language listed like its one of Hitlers speeches. We are here to serve..not be served. Our langauge should always one of graditude, not presented like your doing someone a favor for paying you.

Again, this is not about your protocol...it about your speech writer. I would bet it doesnt do justice to your real fine personality
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