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Any tips for Nashville recording method and protocol.
Old 27th July 2015
  #1
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Any tips for Nashville recording method and protocol.

So as some of you know I spent last week in Nashville finding a studio and I did, moving August 31st. Really excited. I had the opportunity to spend some time at a friends studio on Music Row and a friend who works for Belmont. Really fun but honesty a bit foreign to me having cut my teeth in LA making a lot of rock, pop and hip/hop. We really took our time and were experimental when recording but the Nashville/Music Row seems much more conveyor belt, not a bad thing just different.

I know a bit about the number system, musicians getting scale (I think it was around $330 for 3 hours), hiring a chart maker and how they run the song once and then record it once and move to the next song. Anyway I'd love to learn more and get some people's experience.

Also I've heard that a lot of what is going on in East Nashville and Berry Hill is a bit more familiar to me being that a lot of LA guys are out there and have taken some of the west coast style with them. My studio is in the heart of East Nashville.

Thanks guys,
J
Old 27th July 2015
  #2
I see there really being three things going on in Nashville... bigger budget country, CCM, and independent. While there is overlap, all three have their own ways of working.

Last edited by marcelopennell; 27th July 2015 at 07:08 PM.. Reason: spelling
Old 27th July 2015
  #3
Maybe country still works that way but most CCM is produced by a single producer on a computer. Independent bands experiment and don't do charts obviously. If you aren't producing country then I would worry about all those tales of how Nashville recording works. You should just work how you work best and people will come to you.
Old 27th July 2015
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bottombunk View Post
Maybe country still works that way but most CCM is produced by a single producer on a computer. Independent bands experiment and don't do charts obviously. If you aren't producing country then I would worry about all those tales of how Nashville recording works. You should just work how you work best and people will come to you.
Word, I had a feeling. Thanks man.
Old 27th July 2015
  #5
https://youtu.be/XWMKAX8Chuc

Last edited by Cocobolo81; 28th July 2015 at 06:03 PM..
Old 28th July 2015
  #6
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I smell a start to a great thread!
Old 28th July 2015
  #7
I mostly record bluegrass, americana, and country (not the commercial kind). Usually with a solo artist who hires a group of session musicians the way the session will usually go down is artist sings the song, musicians write a chart, we have a little conversation to make sure we've got the arrangement and changes, then go run it once, talk about ways to improve the arrangement, play it a couple more times and we've got the take. Do any fixes, and move on to the next song or do a little sweetening (double track the guitar, piano player does an organ pass, whatever). Usually 3 or 4 songs get cut in a 3 hour session. Then lunch, and repeat.

Now, that sounds like a "song mill" and not creative, but I don't see it that way. While it takes some preparation on the artist part (you can't come in with half a song) the musicians are pros, and their first pass is usually better than say pass 20! Sometimes as an engineer I wish I had more time to fiddle around with mic placement or whatever, but I usually start with a set up I know works, maybe throw in a couple new things I want to try for my own amusement, and make a couple quick adjustments during set up or after the 1st song.

And Nashville charts aren't restrictive at all, to me they are little road maps that help keep everyone on the same path but in no way dictate what someone's going to play (besides the chord). Without it you there'd be a lot of wasted time trying to get everyone to memorize everything. Who can hear a song once and remember that extra bar in the 3rd verse ; )

Bluegrass will sometimes work that way, but a lot of time those are actual bands and they'll either work out the arrangement in the studio or be rehearsed and come in ready to play it down. Not always the case though, sometimes the band will just have a batch of songs and will work out how to make it there own in the studio, which might take a couple hours before they're ready to try it under mics.

I can say that in my time doing this professionally, I've only had a couple projects where a band camp out for 2 weeks with just a bunch of ideas and hammers out a record...and honestly while that's fun and creative when you are spending money paying everyone it's not the best/most affordable way to do it.

Last edited by Sean Sullivan; 28th July 2015 at 01:20 PM..
Old 28th July 2015
  #8
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This was a pretty informative video:

Old 28th July 2015
  #9
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Pm'd you.
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