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Fluid behind Eardrum after virus - - - - - - help
Old 28th January 2009
  #1
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gurubuzz's Avatar
Fluid behind Eardrum after virus - - - - - - help

I had a virus that lasted a few weeks with swollen glands in my jaw.

A day after swimming I thought that I had water in my ear, it did not go away.

Then I realised I could not adjust the pressure in my left ear. It was then I realised I had some kind of ear infection.

Doctor while on holidays looked inside and confirmed the infection (redness in both ears). I went on a course of antibiotics, didn't work...

I usually don't drink so one hot day I had 4 beers spanning over 6 hours.

It unblocked and sounded normal for the first time in weeks. But next morning it was the same.

My holiday is over now and clients are booking in... I have a weird
resonance in the left ear and attenuation of about -3 to -6 db

I am seeing my regular doctor tomorrow...anyone had similar experiences???
Old 28th January 2009
  #2
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I had a similar experience
it tool years to fix itself

The Quaks all said there is not a lot they can do as it was a problem with the Middle ear.

Make sure you keep your ears dry and keep out of the damp and get plenty of rest
Old 28th January 2009
  #3
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Knox's Avatar
 

I agree with the above post, as this 'could' (hopefully not) take a long time to clear up 100% . . I have had this issue for years off and on. They give antibiotics . . sometimes it takes 2 or 3 rounds of antibiotics before it clears up and the swelling goes down completely and sensitivity is right, but it's the inner ear that seems to not be totally right. The crazy thing is . . . you can have an inner ear infection for months and not even know it. It makes everything 'off'. Be careful because your ears are sensitive right now. I think that's why I have had prolonged issues with my ears because I worked through a couple of earaches when I should have given them more time to heal.
Old 28th January 2009
  #4
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surflounge's Avatar
I've had both ears drilled out because of "surfer's ear". It cost $20,000 per ear, to have them cut off and sewned back on after surgically drilling holes in my head to stop the pain you describe.
Don't shove anything smaller than your elbow into your ear, no matter how good it feels. Spend the money on getting your ears "sucked out" by an ear doctor with the special vacuum machine that unstuffs the goop infecting your inner ear.
Wear earplugs when swimming or hot tubbing. Avoid cold wind and noises.
Don't drive with the windows down, or in a convertible car. No loud gunshots, or prop plane engines. No motorcycles, and no surfing in cold water.
If your ears plug then put in a drop of alcohol and hold a hair dryer pointed away from your head to dry it out. Do not jam qtips into your ear, because that just pushes the wax deeper.

aloha from Dr Surflounge
Old 28th January 2009
  #5
Gear Nut
 

OK--get this...

I had fluid from infection like that behind my right ear drum, so it was killing the sound because of damping the vibration. I had to fly in three days, so the doctor said normally he'd go for a round of antibiotics, but if I had to fly he would drain the fluid by purposefully puncturing the eardrum. You might cringe, and had I not been so worried about flying I might have waited, but anyway I let him do it. He rigged up this air pressure hose through my nasal passage, and by god, the gunk drained out, and between relieving the pressure and also taking antibiotics, it actually worked out really well. Maybe at another time in my life I might have questioned it more, but he seemed to know what he was doing, and guaranteed me that it would actually heal quickly, which it did. I was freaked out a bit, but it actually worked quite well, and I've never felt like it hurt my hearing.

anybody else ever done that? I had other reasons for trusting the guy which I won't go into...but anyway I actually think it was better than letting an infection run its course.

extra after reading "surflounge":I didn't have what surflounge says happened to him (which sounds terrifying), but the "special vacuum machine" sounds close. It was pressure in through the nose, then basically catching it come out the other end. Gross, but it actually felt really good.
Old 28th January 2009
  #6
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Knox's Avatar
 

This is all great info and right on the money. Except for the motorcycle part! *smile* I GOT to ride my bike (I use ear plugs). If you have never had your ears cleaned properly, you owe it to yourself to do so. The procedure I have had was a flushing with water / not "sucked". I also had my ear drums "lanced" once . . . don't know if they still do that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by surflounge View Post
Don't shove anything smaller than your elbow into your ear, no matter how good it feels. Spend the money on getting your ears "sucked out" by an ear doctor with the special vacuum machine that unstuffs the goop infecting your inner ear.
Wear earplugs when swimming or hot tubbing. Avoid cold wind and noises.
Don't drive with the windows down, or in a convertible car. No loud gunshots, or prop plane engines. No motorcycles, and no surfing in cold water.
If your ears plug then put in a drop of alcohol and hold a hair dryer pointed away from your head to dry it out. Do not jam qtips into your ear, because that just pushes the wax deeper.

aloha from Dr Surflounge
Old 28th January 2009
  #7
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memphisindie's Avatar
 

I took benadryl and allerest for a while with some Ibuprofen. Goes away fast, no damage.
Old 28th January 2009
  #8
I've had something similar to this for probably 10 years now, and it was caused by flying when I had a cold. During the flight my left ear plugged up and I experienced an insane amount of pain. After the flight my ear never fully cleared. I've seen several ear doctors who have all told me there is nothing wrong with my ear despite the fact I still feel a slight pressure.

Lately though I have been having days where my left ear gets really plugged and my hearing is all screwed up and I can't work. When I listen to music everything sounds out of phase and it almost hurts to sit between speakers. I'm seeing another doctor on Thursday about it.

I've heard about puncturing a hole in the eardrum and it freaks me out. Glad to hear that someone here has done it and it went okay. It still makes me really nervous though!
Old 28th January 2009
  #9
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Saxon-of-a-son's Avatar
 

I had an infection and fluid fill up behind both ear drums about 6 years ago. I couldn't hear birds chirping! Next day, I woke up, and my left ear drum had burst, and fluid was all over the pillow. Doctor said that's nature's way, not a big deal. It all went away, and the ear drum healed after antibiotics, but my left ear is still more sensitive (to pain) and less sensitive (to high frequencies). Life sucks sometimes. (At least I'm not Beethoven.)
Old 28th January 2009
  #10
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Saxon-of-a-son's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by surflounge View Post
Do not jam qtips into your ear, because that just pushes the wax deeper.
. . . and damages the fine hairs of the middle ear, resulting in tinitus.
Old 28th January 2009
  #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saxon-of-a-son View Post
. . . and damages the fine hairs of the middle ear, resulting in tinitus.
I can imagine that if you pushing the Q-tip in this far, tinnitus is the least of your problems!

Edwin
Old 28th January 2009
  #12
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Old Goat's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by edwinhurwitz View Post
I can imagine that if you pushing the Q-tip in this far, tinnitus is the least of your problems!

Edwin

Yeah, I doubt that's what the medicine man uses to puncture the eardrum!
Old 28th January 2009
  #13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saxon-of-a-son View Post
. . . and damages the fine hairs of the middle ear, resulting in tinitus.
Hmm..not quite sure about that! the hairs you're referring to are in the cochlea...the middle ear is the ossicles (hammer/anvil/stirrup bones) between eardrum and cochlea if my memory serves me correctly.

Not that I disagree with the advice, just the reasoning behind it. it's more likely the pressure from the cotton bud will damage the eardrum.
Old 28th January 2009
  #14
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memphisindie's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
Hmm..not quite sure about that! the hairs you're referring to are in the cochlea...the middle ear is the ossicles (hammer/anvil/stirrup bones) between eardrum and cochlea if my memory serves me correctly.

Not that I disagree with the advice, just the reasoning behind it. it's more likely the pressure from the cotton bud will damage the eardrum.
Hair in your ears have nothing to do with hearing, or, my grandad can hear better than an elephant and your hearing would get better with age!

You are correct, those are the bones involved in hearing, no hairs. I can't believe some of these guys, involved in sound, are thinking hairs help you hear, and it isn't just this thread.
Do NOT jam anything in your ear!
Go to the doctor and have them use a warm water and light suction cleaning, it doesn't hurt and you can hear like a kid again after.

The cotton from the swabs will come off in your ear and form a fiberous wax sludge that will not com out and it will build up on the tympanic membrane causing deafness and possible infection.
When ears are your tools you'd better take care of them and you better know hairs have nothing to do with hearing, they keep the bugs out.
Ears and kidneys form at the same time. If your ears are malformed so are your kidneys. Weird, eh?
Old 28th January 2009
  #15
Lives for gear
Try hydrogen peroxide dropped thru a syringe. Tilt the head, or lay on your side, flush with a generous amount of peroxide, wait a few minutes. Tilt the other side and allow to drain. Do the other ear and allow to dry. Do not stick anything in your ears.
Old 28th January 2009
  #16
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by memphisindie View Post
I can't believe some of these guys, involved in sound, are thinking hairs help you hear, and it isn't just this thread.
Hair cell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Old 28th January 2009
  #17
Gear Maniac
 
valleysound's Avatar
 

I don't want to scare you, but... the same thing happened to me with the ear infection or something like that behind my ear drum about 10 years ago. Very bad, I would fall over in the morning from the pressure in my inner ear. My hearing was also very severely reduced in that one ear. Maybe once or twice a year I would yawn or stretch and all of a sudden I could hear out of my ear, it was like a new ear! My ear felt like it was always clogged and I could hear it "crackling" from the fluid. Plus, loud noises would kill me, very sensitive to the pressure in my ear. It took years for it to "get back to normal". It still feels a little different if I focus on that ear right now. I just let time take its course. Sorry, no good news!
Update: I forgot I did go to an ear/nose/throat specialist many times. I think it was a major allergy to some mold in a house I was living and that's what I told them and they really did not listen to me. I was prescribed steroid nasal spray, but all that did was make me breathe very well but nothing for the ear. I think it has something to do with eustatian tube not working well or clogged. Basically I said f#[email protected] the doctors and just let time heal.
Old 28th January 2009
  #18
Gear Head
 

I definitely feel your pain as I have been dealing with a similiar issue since early December. I had a severe sinus infection and got a migraine. Went to the ER and they shot me up with some stuff via an IV to calm the head pain. Went home and passed out on the sofa and when I woke up, near total deafness in my left ear. It lasted for 3 weeks. Not a budge nor indication that it would clear. I took Predisone for 5 days which helped in getting the fluid to break up and I'm about 85% clear now. I am having issues with hearing high feqs but it is much better. Moral of the story is...it will clear eventually...just give it time and don't freak out about it.
Old 28th January 2009
  #19
Lives for gear
I've had a similar thing for about 5 years. I got really sick and my ears clogged up. After a full recovery my right ear was occasionally clogging up and the sound was similar to putting a finger in my ear. If I'd tip my head to the right (ear pointing down) it would go away and then when I put my head back upright it would come back. It would usually strike early in the morning, or after exercising hard. I got really scared and went to the doctor who could find nothing wrong so I got a hearing test and I tested with excellent hearing (I've worn earplugs all my life LOL).

It was pretty regular in the beginning, but happens less and less as time has gone on. Recently, it's been more in the once or twice a month category. Luckily, it hasn't happened during a session for years, but it had me freaking out so.....

A little over a month ago I started taking N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine to try and get rid of it altogether. It's been 45 days and I haven't had the clogged up sound yet, knock on wood. Now before everyone runs down to buy NAC, you should REALLY talk to your doctor before you start taking it!!!!! (notice the exclamation marks)
Old 2nd February 2009
  #20
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gurubuzz's Avatar
http://www.ent.com.au/glueear.htm

I got this info from

GLUE EAR


NORMAL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION
The middle ear is an air-filled cavity which lies between the external and inner ear. It contains the three bones of hearing: malleus (hammer), incus (anvil), and stapes (stirrup). The eardrum and these bones transmit sound vibrations to the inner ear. The middle ear cavity is connected to the back of the nose (near the adenoids) via the eustachian tube which acts as a pressure equalising valve. The air in the middle ear is continually being absorbed into the bloodstream, thus if normal pressure is to be maintained, this air must be replaced. Consequently a normal eustachian tube will open momentarily every time we swallow to allow a small amount of air into the middle ear.
GLUE EAR
Glue ear is a common condition that affects the middle ear of children with the highest incidence occurring in children between three and six years of age. Glue ear (or fluid) is an accumulation of thick, "gluey" fluid in the middle ear (ie behind the eardrum) usually causing earache and partial deafness. Commonly it is the result eustachian tube blockage from an upper respiratory infection, large adenoids, nasal allergy, poor nasal function, cleft palate, an immature eustachian tube and a number of other factors. In the presence of bacteria, this fluid may be come infected leading to an infected or abscessed middle ear. When infection does not develop, the fluid remains until the eustachian tube again begins to function normally, at which time the fluid is absorbed or drains down the eustachian tube into the throat. Most resolve spontaneously over two to three months but the reminder may persist for many months or indefinitely, unless the fluid is cleared and the middle ear artificially ventilated by a small tube. Scientific studies have shown that recurrent middle ear infections in early life (the first year) can predispose children to increased risk of middle ear infections and persistent "glue ear" later on. Further glue ear in the first three years of life may have long-term effects on reading ability, and possibly the ability to hear in background noise which may interfere with schooling. This suggests that, if antibiotics are not adequate, insertion of tubes may be required.
MEDICAL TREATMENT
Medical treatment is directed towards treatment of the upper respiratory infection or allergy attacks. This may include antibiotics, antihistamines(anti-allergy drugs), decongestants (drugs to decrease mucous membrane swelling) and nasal sprays. Eustachian tube inflation using the Valsalva manoeuvre may be recommended. This aims to blow air through the nose into the obstructed eustachian tube and middle ear to help relieve the congestion and re-establish middle ear ventilation. The Valsalva manoeuvre is accomplished by gently blowing air into the middle ear while holding the nose, often called "popping the ear". This should not be done, however, if there is a cold and nasal congestion.
SURGICAL TREATMENT
To overcome this problem the middle ear is artificially aerated by performing a myringotomy (an incision in the eardrum membrane) and inserting a hollow plastic tube (ventilation tube or "grommet") in the ear drum. An adenoidectomy may also be needed in some cases. This improves hearing and prevents recurrent infections that may damage the eardrum membrane and middle ear bones.
The insertion of the ventilation tubes requires a short general anaesthetic with return home a few hours afterwards. There should be nothing at all to eat or drink for at least 6 hours before the time of operation. If the stomach is not kept empty prior to anaesthesia the operation may have to be postponed.The procedure is performed using an operating microscope. A small incision is made through the eardrum and the fluid in the middle ear is removed with a fine suction tube. A plastic ventilation tube (“grommet”) is inserted.
The tube is eventually pushed out of the drum by flaking of the skin of the ear drum which gets under it and lifts it out and into the ear canal. This occasionally happens very soon but it usually remains in place for 3 to 18 months, although it may not happen for over two years. During this time the eustachian tube obstruction should subside. When ventilation the tube dislodges, the eardrum heals in most cases and the eustachian tube resumes its normal pressure equalising function.
When the ventilation tube dislodges, usually there is no further middle ear ventilation problem. In 20% of patients the glue ear may recur, and reinsertion of a tube may be necessary. At times a permanent eardrum membrane perforation (hole in the eardrum) may develop when the tube is dislodged or removed. If this perforation persists, it can be repaired at a later date when the eustachian tube blockage has subsided.
WATER PRECAUTIONS: It is extremely important that water does not enter the ear when a ventilation tube is in place, as this may lead to infection. This is prevented by placing a cotton wool ball mixed with Vaseline, into the hollow of the ear, before washing or showering. Ear plugs should be used during swimming. The patient may otherwise carry on with normal activities.
FOLLOW-UP
Follow-up review is required at approximately 6 weeks after insertion and then every 4 months until the tube comes out, to see that it is still in position, or that there has not been a recurrence if it has been displaced (which is often not apparent). Apart from a small amount of blood or mucus in the first couple of days after surgery, there should be no discharge. If the ear does discharge after these initial days, the ear should be reviewed.
DISADVANTAGES AND COMPLICATIONS OF VENTILATION TUBES
1) Recurrence of the “glue ear” – 20% of "glue ears" may require further grommets.
2) Infection of the grommet and ears-usually responds to medical treatment but may need grommet removal.
3) Blockage of the hole in the grommet leading to it being non‑functioning and possibly requiring replacement.
4) Early displacement of the grommet which may require reinsertion.
5) Failure of the hole in the ear drum to heal after the grommet has come out.
6) Thinning or weakening of the ear drum (not usually a significant problem and can occur because of middle ear problems themselves without grommet insertion).
7) Scarring of the ear drum ‑ not often a problem.
8) Other complications (including those of general anaesthesia are possible but uncommon).
Excerpted from material prepared by the Michigan Ear Institute, Farmington Hills, MI, USA - August 2001

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Please note: The above is intended as a general guideline only for Dr. Becvarovski’s patients.
This material should not be used for purposes of diagnosis or treatment without consulting a physician.
Each patient is an individual and should be treated accordingly.
Please contact our rooms if you are concerned or require any further information.
Dr Zoran Becvarovski MBBS, FRACS

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Old 4th October 2009
  #21
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Jay-'s Avatar
Hi, any more tips or news about this?
Iv had a clogged ear tube for 8 years.
Dr wanted to drill, I was um, no because Ill have to kill you it if goes wrong.

I started using the Nasal irrigation for 3 months now.
No use! Actually makes it a bit worse!

My thought was take a Dr prescription and also rinse the nose with the saline solution

So that equals=
Open ear drain tubes
Plenty of clean nose and clean water irrigation.

I'm also going into Didgeridoo therapy as that used to my my main instrument.
Old 4th October 2009
  #22
Lives for gear
There was a different thread where a few people talked about success with a medical device called the Earpopper (Rx required). Someone who had one and lost it had their girlfriend do the same procedure by blowing through his nose while he swallowed to accomplish the same thing and said it worked. So I tried it - after my wife could get over the giggling, I can say that it is very successful. She now knows the routine. It works 95% of the time.
Old 4th October 2009
  #23
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Jay-'s Avatar
Good lord, $200!

I wonder if I can get some chick on cragslist to come blow in my nose for less. heh
Old 4th October 2009
  #24
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MrCrowbar's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay- View Post
Good lord, $200!

I wonder if I can get some chick on cragslist to come blow in my nose for less. heh
Just fake a respiratory arrest in front of a place where they teach CPR. ;-)
Old 4th October 2009
  #25
Gear Addict
 
sscannon's Avatar
 

2 weeks ago, I had an earache for a couple of days. I was working the whole time, so I just took Ibuprofen and kept going, and was noticing chirping in the left ear. Then before bed at about 3am, I noticed I had great difficulty closing my left eye. Then, when I spit after brushing my teeth, the spit came out the side of my mouth, and I could do nothing to aim it. I realized I just lost muscle control over half of my face!!

I went to the ER, thinking I had had a stroke, and was told I had Bell's Palsy due to pressure on the nerve that controls the face muscles, and it was caused by swelling from the ear infection. OK, I start taking antibiotics and steroids.

As instructed, a week later I go see a specialist who tells me I don't have an infection, it's a virus, and prescribes anti-viral instead. Both doctors also prescribed steroids for the swelling.

I now have my face muscles back, and I think the ear problem has cleared up, but we'll see this week at my followup appointment with the specialist. I will not ignore earaches ever again.
Old 4th October 2009
  #26
Here for the gear
 

Google "Ear Candling" and see if it's something you'd be willing to try. I'd be interested to see if it helps. I have it done twice a year. Generally two candles per ear in a relaxed, spa like enviroment.

-Jon
Old 4th October 2009
  #27
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gurubuzz's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay- View Post
Hi, any more tips or news about this?
Iv had a clogged ear tube for 8 years.
Dr wanted to drill, I was um, no because Ill have to kill you it if goes wrong.

I started using the Nasal irrigation for 3 months now.
No use! Actually makes it a bit worse!

My thought was take a Dr prescription and also rinse the nose with the saline solution

So that equals=
Open ear drain tubes
Plenty of clean nose and clean water irrigation.

I'm also going into Didgeridoo therapy as that used to my my main instrument.

Mine cleared up after about 4 weeks.

Many children get this and the fix is called grommets.

It is a very safe procedure. A doctor makes a small hole in the ear drum and places a tiny plug in it that has a hole which allows the thick fluid to drain then our ear replaces the fluid with the right stuff.

Your ear drum is not as delicate as you think it can be ruptured and it heals over. I got slapped on my ear once in a fighttutt (it was a long time ago and it was....better stop that storry right now ...ah hem.) and it burst my ear drum, I know because when you blow your nose you can hear air rushing past...

It does not effect your hearing if it's a small tear, it's like a slight tear in a speaker cone. If you've ever had a torn speaker you'll know that if it is only a small tear it makes no difference at all to the sound.

So get it done the grommet falls out and the ear drum heals itself over.

Remember the inner ear is the irreparable part. The cochlea.

The ear drum is a mystical piece of skin.
Old 4th October 2009
  #28
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gurubuzz's Avatar











Old 10th October 2011
  #29
Gear Nut
 

My doctor is suspecting that I have fluids in my ear since there was no damage to the ear drum. He sent a recommendation for an Ear, Nose and Mouth appointment to the hospital but the waiting is killing me.

Have anyone of you with a history of the same problem noticed that the ear that you had problem with had pitch problems? It is like everything is pitched up a half semitone or something and all male vocalists sound like they haven't entered puberty. Another thing is that if I lower the volume the stereo image i hear is drifting to the left (my good ear). If I turn up louder the sound comes back to the middle again. Regards.
Old 11th October 2011
  #30
Gear Nut
 

this is the scariest thread I have ever read.
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