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How have you blasted you ears? In the studio or otherwise.
Old 28th May 2019
  #1
Gear Head
 

How have you blasted you ears? In the studio or otherwise.

I recently was in a music store and I thought I put on some headphones and hit a few pads on the new Akai Force production station. An amazingly loud sample was blasted into my ears. Lesson learned.

Another time I tried to walk by a guy cutting concrete with a saw beside the front door of my condo. Even with plugging my ears, my cochlea hairs took a beating.

What other situations should I look out for? In or out of the studio.

Thanks
Old 29th May 2019
  #2
moving a mic standing 1' in front of the main right PA stack while another live sound student is using the graphic eq to provoke feedback. Feedback in the lower mids blew my right ear, I was deaf on that side for two days. That was in 2000 and I am still unable to work on music at normal (moderate) listening levels, dislike gatherings of people etc. It's been a massive hit on life quality. I am currently applying for disability pension in part because overexposure to sound (everyday noises, not talking concerts or night clubs) makes me so fatigued I have whole days where I am unable to get out of bed.

had a bit of a chip on my shoulder for a while against the teacher who told me to move that mic without ensuring the other guy stop what he was doing. I was 18 and planning on moving to London the following year for studies at SAE, but that dream went down the drain faster than you can say wwwwWWOMPP!!

an interesting thing my audiologist told me, though: She specialises in treatment of tinnitus and hyperacusis and says every single patient she has seen with my kind of issue is of the anxious, overachiever/perfectionist type...there are people with far worse tinnitus etc. who handle it just fine, so many of the ramifications are down to the individual personality. Desensitisation treatment helps and life can be good despite these problems...but I saw the title of this thread on the GS front page and it hit me in the face - how much that blast changed everything. Take care of those ears!
Old 29th May 2019
  #3
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by thermal View Post
moving a mic standing 1' in front of the main right PA stack while another live sound student is using the graphic eq to provoke feedback. Feedback in the lower mids blew my right ear, I was deaf on that side for two days. That was in 2000 and I am still unable to work on music at normal (moderate) listening levels, dislike gatherings of people etc. It's been a massive hit on life quality. I am currently applying for disability pension in part because overexposure to sound (everyday noises, not talking concerts or night clubs) makes me so fatigued I have whole days where I am unable to get out of bed.

had a bit of a chip on my shoulder for a while against the teacher who told me to move that mic without ensuring the other guy stop what he was doing. I was 18 and planning on moving to London the following year for studies at SAE, but that dream went down the drain faster than you can say wwwwWWOMPP!!

an interesting thing my audiologist told me, though: She specialises in treatment of tinnitus and hyperacusis and says every single patient she has seen with my kind of issue is of the anxious, overachiever/perfectionist type...there are people with far worse tinnitus etc. who handle it just fine, so many of the ramifications are down to the individual personality. Desensitisation treatment helps and life can be good despite these problems...but I saw the title of this thread on the GS front page and it hit me in the face - how much that blast changed everything. Take care of those ears!
Really sorry to hear such a horrible story. U poor thing! I have also received those blasts from PAs when sound checking. I have sung/played in bands for years. They are so loud and painful and have also experienced temporary deafness from them. My advice might be totally out of line here but I had a problem with my voice for over ten years. It was getting excess phlegm and tiring quickly. It almost made me give up music and go into a depression. I sometimes couldn’t get out of bed either. Eventually I found a singing teacher who taught me to sing through it. Within a few months, not only could I do that but the problem had actually vanished. I now perform for hrs on end many times a week often with no issue. I have for years. It’s not to say that it was all in my head (in my case it was seen on larynx exam) but my head was able to first work with it and then totally overcome it. In my total ignorance of ur case, I find it mighty strange that a single loud PA blast permanently damaged u at such a young age. What if it instead set up brain protection mechanisms? Perhaps U were sensitised to loud noises and it changed the way u listen. Please don’t take this post the wrong way. I’m not arguing it’s all psychological because the brain could have set up pathways to reflect this. BUT maybe just maybe u can learn to listen another way. Do U pass hearing exams? Maybe u can do this. I more wanted to share my story in case of value to u. I obviously know nothing about ur case and could of course be entirely wrong.
Old 29th May 2019
  #4
Lives for gear
 
Jeff Hayat's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Axon Jackson View Post
I recently was in a music store and I thought I put on some headphones and hit a few pads on the new Akai Force production station. An amazingly loud sample was blasted into my ears. Lesson learned.
NEVER put headphones properly on until you have determined what level they are putting out. ALWAYS cradle them around your neck, or hold them near (not right next to) an ear first.

Cheers.
Old 31st May 2019
  #5
Gear Nut
I've heard so many bad stories that I'm SUPER paranoid about sound levels, standing close to speakers etc. I bought a monitor controller and at home its always at arms reach too...Got into the habit of muting speakers then slowly turning them up if I'm opening an old project or something.. ALWAYS turn down master levels before listening to equipment too.

Also using professional earplugs when going to a loud place is good idea too. Today they are so advanced and tiny that its easy to carry them around.

So they say hindsight is always 20/20, but outside of accidents most of it really is just common sense you don't care about until BAM your ears are gone. :(

Anyway hope science developes better ways to treat people with hearing damage. I kinda think we're gonna have great leaps forward in this area in the coming years and decades.
Old 31st May 2019
  #6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moondog007 View Post
I find it mighty strange that a single loud PA blast permanently damaged u at such a young age. What if it instead set up brain protection mechanisms? Perhaps U were sensitised to loud noises and it changed the way u listen.
Definitely. Sound subconsciously raises my alertness/stress levels. The strange thing is that I sometimes get fatigued without noticing any discomfort. But I do believe the physical symptoms are triggered by my subconsciously trained fear response. Thanks for your kind words and for sharing your story. Singing does not work well for me unless my ears are good, unfortunately.

My audiologist has helped increase my tolerance of sound, but it's like a buffer that wears out and when it's gone it takes a long time to build it back up. In the meantime I am not well. I always associate it with cartoons like Road Runner or Tom and Jerry, when someone clashes two cymbals together with the "bad" character's head in between. I feel like I've just heard a loud cymbal clash from a close distance and get dizzy, jarred, on edge. It hurts in the instant the sound occurs, then I have a couple of minutes of dizziness and confusion before my muscles tighten up and the half of my head closest to the sound goes numb. Then it gets painful and the ear feels pressurised, sometimes with cramps of the small muscles in the middle ear. My ears become extremely sensitive to almost any sound and I just have to wait until it gets better (distractions help, if I am not too fatigued to use them)

To be fair my hyperacusis wasn't as bad to begin with. There was another event about a year after that made it a lot worse, namely a sound check with my cousin's band when a very loud feedback occurred. It was already getting too loud for me (drums), and when the feedback happened I had to leave at once. After that I started wearing earplugs regularly.
Old 31st May 2019
  #7
Lives for gear
 
Robo's Avatar
When I was about 12-14 in the 80s me and a friend were playing on a building site. It must have been around fireworks day. We had some of those rolls of red paper caps for toy cap guns. We wondered what detonating a whole roll would be like. So we piled up about 8 of these rolls... and smashed a large rock down onto them.

We both lost our hearing for about 5 minutes, exactly like that effect in the films but without the ringing. Totally stupid. Thankfully I don't have any problems today and still have good hearing. I think we were lucky. That was one hell of a bang.
Old 31st May 2019
  #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo View Post
When I was about 12-14 in the 80s me and a friend were playing on a building site. It must have been around fireworks day. We had some of those rolls of red paper caps for toy cap guns. We wondered what detonating a whole roll would be like. So we piled up about 8 of these rolls... and smashed a large rock down onto them.

We both lost our hearing for about 5 minutes, exactly like that effect in the films but without the ringing. Totally stupid. Thankfully I don't have any problems today and still have good hearing. I think we were lucky. That was one hell of a bang.
Haha, that takes me back. My friends and I always made bombs like that. We would fold the paper down the middle to ensure all caps going off at once, roll the paper around a small rock and tape it tightly (not too tight! Boom) like a ball. Then it was just a matter of chucking it into the ground or a concrete wall. If you used masking tape, it could double as a fuse. I especially found it funny to make a sort of bomb hat on Lego men and light the top of the hat (fuse) on fire.
Old 1st June 2019
  #9
Lives for gear
 
Robo's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by thermal View Post
Haha, that takes me back. My friends and I always made bombs like that. We would fold the paper down the middle to ensure all caps going off at once, roll the paper around a small rock and tape it tightly (not too tight! Boom) like a ball. Then it was just a matter of chucking it into the ground or a concrete wall. If you used masking tape, it could double as a fuse. I especially found it funny to make a sort of bomb hat on Lego men and light the top of the hat (fuse) on fire.
I'm right with you there. To the mollycoddled generation this sounds like we are pyromaniacs/psycopaths, but back in the days before health and safety even possibly existed at all it was just a normal way for kids to learn about the world/science, etc, etc.

Wait, my chip pan is on fire, where's that water bucket?!
Old 1st June 2019
  #10
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Lots of VO people come from radio, and some of those guys (it's always guys) have been listening loud enough for long enough that they're more or less deaf. You have to make sure to turn down the mic when they take off their headphones or you'll get feedback. For which you will be blamed.
Old 1st June 2019
  #11
Lives for gear
 
foxwaves's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Axon Jackson View Post

What other situations should I look out for? In or out of the studio.

Thanks
Marriage.
Old 24th July 2019
  #12
Here for the gear
 

except that you forget to lower the volume. My feeling is still that a sudden bang can really do damage. These are 120 watt speakers.





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