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your ability to hear high freq. (up to khz)?
Old 9th January 2019
  #1
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your ability to hear high freq. (up to khz)?

when did you test your hearing ability lastly (audiogram) ?
i downloaded a freq. generator app and was somewhat shocked!
ok, i am old (fortysomething) but at first i thought it was the incapacity of the ipad speakers. above 13 khz there wasnt much to hear. But my 7 year old son
recognised frequencies above 20 khz!
ok, i knew it in theory, but i never felt any hearing loss (in oposite of beeing totaly aware of my eyes getting worser).

hands down, all those 48 vs 96 khz debates apart, do you really face the truth about your decreasing hearing ability, and if yes (i suppose this is a normal aging effect) does it hinder you to make the right decissions in your craft as an audio engineer?
Old 9th January 2019
  #2
Gear Addict
 
dcwave's Avatar
 

I was tested a year ago when I took my wife to get tested post chemotherapy (which can cause hearing loss). I have 1-2dB dips here and there - mostly in the mids, but can hear up to 17k. I can't hear anything above that unless it's painfully loud. I carry ear plugs with me everywhere, and have since I was about 12. I was susceptible to loud noises as a kid. When I played in band, or went to concerts, I always wore earplugs, and when driving in the car more than 30 minutes I'm 49, I'm lucky age related hearing loss hasn't been an issue for me - might be hereditary since my 70yo mom can hear cleanly up to about 14k (she was just tested because she couldn't hear in one of her ears - it was a small cyst in the ear canal that once removed cleared things right up)
Old 10th January 2019
  #3
Lives for gear
 

Guesstimate around 17KHz, since I'm pushing 60.
I tested 22KHz plus, when I was 6 years old.

Kept excellent care of my hearing, after that.
I'm the one, a number of bands ask to listen to their soundcheck/live mix.
Chris
Old 10th January 2019
  #4
Gear Head
 

30 y/o and i can still hear clearly 20Khz when I play a sine wave on my monitors. Even at low volumes.

Hope this lasts for many years.
Old 10th January 2019
  #5
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Brian M. Boykin's Avatar
I did an unofficial about a month or so ago with headphones and a tone generator. I could hear down to 17hz and started having to increase volume for highs around 8k. Not really sure when I can say I stopped hearing the highs but it was sooner then I liked. I started reading up on human hearing and the human ear, by design, is mid focused. Meaning you won’t pereve a 60hz tone plaid at the same dB as loud as a 1k tone. Same is true for a 10k tone. There’s scientific terminology for this but I’ve already forgotten it, but one article I read explained it by pointing out the most common graphic EQ setting is a smiley face. Boosting the lows and the highs. I like subtractive EQ so I usually cut mids. Just some food for thought.

Brian
Old 10th January 2019
  #6
Gear Maniac
 

Last tested two years ago. I have a bit of tinnitus around 4.5k (cranked marching snare drums in my youth). I still hear up to around 17k. I'm 39.

My tinnitus isn't bad, considering. I get fatigued sooner than I would like. Have to take breaks more often than I used to. I have to run a fan when I go to sleep.

Knowing where I have issues has made mixing easier. I have some work-arounds. Reference material is my friend.

I get tested every few years. Haven't experienced any significant changes since I started taking better care of my ears.
Old 10th January 2019
  #7
Age 46.. In an online hearing tone generator test (frequency sweep) I could hear the increase up to 17K and after 17 could hear something but couldnt tell if it was increasing. In high school I could clearly hear the increase from 17-20 and then topped around 20.5. Playing an individual sound I can hear 18.5 and faintly 19k which is tops. Better make music while I can still hear.
Old 10th January 2019
  #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by FranciscoFrugoni View Post
30 y/o and i can still hear clearly 20Khz when I play a sine wave on my monitors. Even at low volumes.

Hope this lasts for many years.
One of the first signs of aging is vision starting to deteriorate in the 40s. Not sure when hearing starts to deteriorate. How depressing.
Old 10th January 2019
  #9
FWIW proper calibrated hearing tests generally only go to around 8kHz - it's the speech aspect that is pretty much all the medical profession cares about.

I think there may be a specialist test that goes closer to 10-12kHz.

Unfortunately, it's unlikely most 40-50yos are hearing 17k - more likely distortion in lower frequencies!

I'm sure there's exceptions.

At any rate - the most respected engineers are generally 40s and up, so clearly it's how you interpret that. I wouldn't worry about the natural effects of ageing (although carrying earplugs and using them when prudent is obviously a good idea).
Old 10th January 2019
  #10
Lives for gear
 

I have it on good authority...
Chuck Norris hears above 200 KHz though!
Chris
Old 11th January 2019
  #11
Gear Addict
 
dcwave's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by psycho_monkey View Post
FWIW proper calibrated hearing tests generally only go to around 8kHz - it's the speech aspect that is pretty much all the medical profession cares about.

I think there may be a specialist test that goes closer to 10-12kHz.

Unfortunately, it's unlikely most 40-50yos are hearing 17k - more likely distortion in lower frequencies!

I'm sure there's exceptions.

At any rate - the most respected engineers are generally 40s and up, so clearly it's how you interpret that. I wouldn't worry about the natural effects of ageing (although carrying earplugs and using them when prudent is obviously a good idea).
This is actually what the hearing doctor was focused on when my wife and I went in. it was between 150hz to 10k where they focused; things like muffled speech, directions, etc . They did a general sweep up to 18k with the closed back big cup style headphones in an egg chair to get a baseline, then tested mostly in the speech ranges.

One of the tests they did was to simulate a room full of people talking, then had words being said to you from a person 2 feet away, 3 feet, and 4 feet and various pitches and levels and you had to select what you thought they said. This is where they said i had a db or 2 drop in some areas and with certain consonants and vowels at some frequencies, but overall my hearing was fine and was within "exceptional" range for someone my age. Hence the reason I said hearing was "clean" up to 17k, i.e. no distortions and could clearly hear the test tone.
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