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Quitting Smoking
Old 11th February 2018
  #31
Gear Addict
As they say, stopping isn't the problem. Not starting up again is.

Don't look at the one week as a failure. Look at it as 6 days of success and one day of failure. What happened on the day you failed? Stress. That's a trigger for you. So make a plan. What are you going to do the next time you're stressed instead of lighting up?

There's always those stories of amazing will power and people just deciding they're going to quit, put it down, and never even think about it again. But the rest of us have to struggle, and do more than just say we want to quit in order to actually quit.
Old 11th February 2018
  #32
Lives for gear
 
RRCHON's Avatar
There are a few ways to quit.

1) Zealotry / cold turkey: Convince yourself cigarettes are the worst thing in the world and not only act like it, actually believe it and if you see any one else smoking / woe be onto them. It is a means to end, if you really want to quit, it works. You'll be that guy, but if you can live with that and really want to quit even me telling you that it is just a means to end will be rationalized away quite easily.

2) Science & support: Chantix, Zyban and even Wellburtin (though that is off label and technically illegal) + counselling and support groups which do kind of touch on Zealotry but it's not full on.

3) Replacement: e-cigarettes, nic-gum, patches, etc...

4) An other powerful addiction: working out a lot(which is what worked for me along with some patches), massive amounts of caffeine, or something worse than cigarettes.

You need to give your brain time to readjust to life without nicotine, especially if you started young like I did. Anger and inappropriate responses to stressful situations are not just symptoms of withdrawal they are things you never learned to quite do for yourself as nicotine can chemically take the edge off life. A couple of University psychiatrists including Stanford Medical School have papers on the matter. This isn't a reason to continue smoking... just know what you are getting into. Psychiatrists and comparative pharmacologists also say that Nicotine is just addictive as heroine and more addictive than cocaine, just because its legal doesn't make it any less of challenge. Understanding this really helped me quit, not because nicotine is inherently evil, just knowing what was going on and why my body was doing what it was going helped me manage the stresses involved in a more detached manner, and with less guilt and shame when I did falter. Being objective about it really helped me a great deal.

Personally I really enjoyed smoking when I used to smoke, but I got tired of not being able to smoke outside of my man-cave detached garage or outside regardless of the season.

Also, just be to be honest, the desire to smoke never really goes away. Years later, you might might still crave a cigarette, I know that at least once or twice a year I see someone smoking or I might be stuck and traffic and my brain puts the thought in my head - that a cigarette would be super fantastic awesome idea. If you are want to quit (for whatever reason) I hope it works out for you and that you appreciate how much of a monumental challenge it is.
Old 11th February 2018
  #33
Lives for gear
 
FreshProduce's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by RRCHON View Post
There are a few ways to quit.

1) Zealotry / cold turkey: Convince yourself cigarettes are the worst thing in the world and not only act like it, actually believe it and if you see any one else smoking / woe be onto them. It is a means to end, if you really want to quit, it works. You'll be that guy, but if you can live with that and really want to quit even me telling you that it is just a means to end will be rationalized away quite easily.

2) Science & support: Chantix, Zyban and even Wellburtin (though that is off label and technically illegal) + counselling and support groups which do kind of touch on Zealotry but it's not full on.

3) Replacement: e-cigarettes, nic-gum, patches, etc...

4) An other powerful addiction: working out a lot(which is what worked for me along with some patches), massive amounts of caffeine, or something worse than cigarettes.

You need to give your brain time to readjust to life without nicotine, especially if you started young like I did. Anger and inappropriate responses to stressful situations are not just symptoms of withdrawal they are things you never learned to quite do for yourself as nicotine can chemically take the edge off life. A couple of University psychiatrists including Stanford Medical School have papers on the matter. This isn't a reason to continue smoking... just know what you are getting into. Psychiatrists and comparative pharmacologists also say that Nicotine is just addictive as heroine and more addictive than cocaine, just because its legal doesn't make it any less of challenge. Understanding this really helped me quit, not because nicotine is inherently evil, just knowing what was going on and why my body was doing what it was going helped me manage the stresses involved in a more detached manner, and with less guilt and shame when I did falter. Being objective about it really helped me a great deal.

Personally I really enjoyed smoking when I used to smoke, but I got tired of not being able to smoke outside of my man-cave detached garage or outside regardless of the season.

Also, just be to be honest, the desire to smoke never really goes away. Years later, you might might still crave a cigarette, I know that at least once or twice a year I see someone smoking or I might be stuck and traffic and my brain puts the thought in my head - that a cigarette would be super fantastic awesome idea. If you are want to quit (for whatever reason) I hope it works out for you and that you appreciate how much of a monumental challenge it is.
Great points here.
I'd like to add that convincing yourself it's disgusting is a sure fire way to prep yourself to quit. I'm not gonna lie.. I actually craved one today for the first time in a long time due to stress.. but it was short lived. The smell of second hand smoke is enough to satisfy whatever cravings may occur now (because I now find it disgusting) although it's not required to fight off an urge.

Yeah that desire can be deeply rooted.. especially if you were a pack a dayer for longer than 10 years.. but it's nothing that can't be controlled as long as you trust and have faith in your own strength. Thats really what it's about.

I been to many churches
I quoted many verses
I dealt with my base self-
I control my many urges
-Talib Kweli
Old 11th February 2018
  #34
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Noisewagon View Post
That movies was AWESOME!

But alas, quitting is a problem. Especially when so many celebs do it and so many movies/shows show it as inevitable.
Old 12th February 2018
  #35
Here for the gear
 

Cold Turkey is the only way for me to do it. Similar story to you. I started at 14, i'm 30 now, and I could feel I was starting to suffer.

I've tried to give up a million times over the last 6 years with no success. Tried all the replacements, but they all keep you addicted to something.

The best stints i've done (4-6 months), have all come from just waking up one day and getting that feeling of "that's it, i've had enough."

So far i've found the 4 month barrier the hardest to break through. I'm on a new attempt, one month in and going strong. I've GOT to do it this time! I don't want to suffer in old age, which I will if I start again.

Good luck!
Old 12th February 2018
  #36
Lives for gear
 
apartment dog's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thehightenor View Post
If it's time to quit - then simply quit!

Don't turn into into a "big thing"

I smoked when I was younger and one day many years ago decided it would be best for my long term health that I quit.

Now being a very logically minded chap.

I thought to myself, to smoke I have to move my arm and operate my fingers to remove a cigarette from it's packet then use my arm to put the fag in my mouth then my other arm and hands to light it.

I asked myself "am I in control of my arms and hands" .... answer yes!

I don't randomly punch myself in the face .... because I have control of my arms and hands.

Sounds crazy but it worked for me, by focusing on something other than the smoking itself.

You are in control of your arms and hands - focus on that!!!!

Your absolutely doing the right thing wanting to quit
I had a similar approach;
I quit by telling myself that I am far stronger and smarter than that plant I thought I was addicted to. A plant that wins from me??? No way.
Or to say it better; I did not allow myself to pretend that I could not win from a plant.
(No disrespect for plants......)

I agree with other posters that association of an addiction to good feelings takes a while to get rid of. The harder part of quitting. But for me the moments of longing became shorter and shorter.
I can see the benefit of an occasional drink but no benefits of smoking. I don't miss it at all and my wife and I are very happy that our kids grow up in a house without smoke. We grew up with smoking fathers, brothers, uncles, aunts. Birthdays when you had to leave the living room because your eyes were in so much pain.

Not that there is no other poison around, but let's not go there.
Old 12th February 2018
  #37
Gear Addict
One more helpful thing that I've found; At no point in time do you say "Oh well, I blew it, I may as well have some fun now!" Nope, and nope again. If you can keep that slip to one day, keep it to one day. If you can keep it to one cig, keep it to one cig, or one puff. Or light it up and say "What the hell am I doing !?" and quickly put it out.

If you're in San Francisco and you want to go to New York, but somehow end up in San Antonio. You don't turn around and go back to San Francisco and start over again.
Old 13th February 2018
  #38
Gear Maniac
 

I was shown this by my BioPsych lecturer. The guy is not Mr Personaity but the info and presentation is good.

#8 in particular describes some of the mechanism of addiction. Understanding this might give you some insight into what will work for you and what's happening when you feel like giving up giving up.

Dr Kevin McCauley
Old 5 days ago
  #39
jrl
Here for the gear
Tomorrow will be 5 months smoke free for me, after 38 years of smoking. I tried many many times, tried many ways, but would only make it a couple days to maybe a month. This time is different, I will not smoke again. I have no desire, only the mildest cravings on occasion, and they are easily ignored.

Personally (and I grant that this is different for everyone), cold turkey is the easiest way to go long term. Patches, gum, vaping just prolong the pain. It is true that the physical addiction goes away after a few days. However the physical damage can take months before you feel normal again. My lungs felt worse for a long time, because they were working to heal. A cigarette would numb the discomfort like it always has. I felt dopey/stupid(er) because I pretty much grew up with nicotine in my system and my brain didn't know how to operate without it. It was a good 2-3 months to feel better. These physical symptoms can be confused for nicotine cravings. They are not. Recognize that it is healing just like getting over the flu, or breaking your leg. IMHO, nicotine replacement slows down this healing process, without really making it that much less unpleasant. That is me, though. You do you.

Caffeine was another issue I realized this time. Nicotine suppresses caffeine to an extent. My morning routine involved lots of coffee. I would get overloaded on caffeine and go have a smoke to calm it down. then I would need more caffeine, wash rinse repeat.. Knowing that the feeling is too much caffeine and not a nicotine fit was a huge breakthrough for me.

A couple things that helped were Alan Carr's book 'Easy Way To Quit Smoking'. It reads a bit like a shamwow commercial, but there is some good stuff in there on recognizing triggers, and learning to ignore them. Also, I used an Android app Smoke Free. It has daily tips and exercises, and just kinda keeps you accountable.

As was stated above, quitting was a fantastic choice for me. I am happy I am a non smoker. I know that just one cigarette will take me right down the rabbit hole to smoking again. I know that one cigarette will in no way improve anything whatsoever. It won't make a bad day better. It won't make a good buzz better. It won't make a good meal better. It won't make after sex better. It will make my breathing worse, it will make me stink, it will cost me money that is better spent on music, track days, beer and many other great things. The only reason to smoke is excuses and self deception.

Quit today, quit right now. You got this, you can do it!
Old 5 days ago
  #40
Gear Addict
It has been suggested that one of the things that makes cigarettes so addictive is not the intensity of the rush they give you, which is easily eclipsed by cocaine or heroine, but the number of hits a person takes during a day and the immediacy of the reward. When something is inhaled, it gets to the brain quicker than other pathways, like insufflation(snorting) or ingesting, resulting in a more powerful behavior-reward association. And then if a person smokes 10 cigarettes a day, they get about 200 action-reward events per day, vs 1 or two for a heroin junkie.
Old 5 days ago
  #41
Gear Addict
 
Wolf LeProducer's Avatar
 

Smoking was the hardest thing I ever quit. So bad that I don't celebrate, "anniversaries," I just block it out of my mind completely. It has been about 8 years since that last smoke.


Before that, I had numerous, uncountable failures. What finally made me give it up? Respiratory infections that just wouldn't cure. Multiple rounds of antibiotics, and my Doctor just said to me, "well, this is all smoking, and if you don't stop now, I don't know what we can do." I guess my body just couldn't handle smoking.


3 weeks in bed with the shakes, shivers, and sweats. I'll never forget it
Old 5 days ago
  #42
Gear Maniac
 
clump's Avatar
 

I started smoking at 15. Two and a half years ago, at 54, I had a heart attack; not a big 'Hollywood clutching the chest' type heart attack, but a heart attack none the less......I had my last cig whilst waiting for the cab to take me to the hospital, and I haven't had one since.

I don't know whether I'm imagining it, but I seem to find it harder being creative as a non-smoker.....although I don't have 'cravings' I feel as if I have lost something, smoking sort of defined me.....I just miss 'being' a smoker.

I suppose fear is a great incentive to give up cigarettes......If I'm still here at 70 I'm going to start smoking again.
Old 4 days ago
  #43
Lives for gear
 
FreshProduce's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by clump View Post
I started smoking at 15. Two and a half years ago, at 54, I had a heart attack; not a big 'Hollywood clutching the chest' type heart attack, but a heart attack none the less......I had my last cig whilst waiting for the cab to take me to the hospital, and I haven't had one since.

I don't know whether I'm imagining it, but I seem to find it harder being creative as a non-smoker.....although I don't have 'cravings' I feel as if I have lost something, smoking sort of defined me.....I just miss 'being' a smoker.

I suppose fear is a great incentive to give up cigarettes......If I'm still here at 70 I'm going to start smoking again.
Or you could just.. ya know.. not start up again..
Old 4 days ago
  #44
Lives for gear
 

I'm nicotine free since 12/7/00.
Zyban did the trick.
I started when I was four years old, stopped and started till I was nine, and had a pack a day habit by thirteen. I smoked for 32 years.
It is significantly worse than heroin addiction, hope you have a horny mate, she will help you keep your weight down, if you bang a lot...
Tendency is to over eat...once you regain your sense of taste and smell.
Better find something to do with your mind...it will need constant attention and retraining of your reward/belief system...

YYMV

Light

Temple
Old 4 days ago
  #45
Gear Maniac
 

Quitting tobacco is easy. I've don't it at least 20 times. It's always a monkey on my back and I've been off it for nearly 2 years. My favorite thing to do is drink and smoke with my buds.
Old 4 days ago
  #46
Lives for gear
 
FreshProduce's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnd5412 View Post
Quitting tobacco is easy. I've don't it at least 20 times. It's always a monkey on my back and I've been off it for nearly 2 years. My favorite thing to do is drink and smoke with my buds.
You've stopped at least 20 times.

You cannot quit anything more than once.
Old 4 days ago
  #47
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreshProduce View Post
You've stopped at least 20 times.

You cannot quit anything more than once.
eh, never mind. My jokes suck.
Old 4 days ago
  #48
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cavern's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Temple of Light View Post
I'm nicotine free since 12/7/00.
Zyban did the trick.
I started when I was four years old, stopped and started till I was nine, and had a pack a day habit by thirteen. I smoked for 32 years.
It is significantly worse than heroin addiction, hope you have a horny mate, she will help you keep your weight down, if you bang a lot...
Tendency is to over eat...once you regain your sense of taste and smell.
Better find something to do with your mind...it will need constant attention and retraining of your reward/belief system...

YYMV

Light

Temple
4 years old?
Aldi, is that you?
Attached Thumbnails
Quitting Smoking-smoking1-768x504.png  
Old 4 days ago
  #49
Gear Maniac
 

I quit in 2013 after 30+years. I decided that I wasn't gonna die before I got old so it was time to start taking care of myself. The hardest part for me was the "monkey" was terrified. Every time I even thought about quitting I would get frantic and I finally just realized that my brains addiction apparatus was causing actual fear of quitting. Once I "logic-ed" that out (I had to ask myself what there was that I could actual fear was a consequence of not smoking) I was able to quit with almost no stress, though I did have to deal with the many physical issues we all have to. I found an old cig under my desk behind a computer when I was rewiring after about a year smoke free. I picked up and put it where I can see it and sneer at it as I walk by. Don't need it any more. Of course if I live past 80 I plan to drink smoke eat bacon for breakfast lunch and dinner and generally misbehave as much as possible just because
Old 4 days ago
  #50
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12tone's Avatar
 

F*CK me...I started up again.

I'm in the process of moving, and the stress is too intense, and a couple of puffs here and there helps calm me down. I just smoke a 1/4 of it, not all the way down to the filter.

American Spirit yellows. Tastes good.

When I get settled, gonna quit again, and exercise like a maniac to mitigate this lapse...
Old 4 days ago
  #51
Gear Addict
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12tone View Post
F*CK me...I started up again.

I'm in the process of moving, and the stress is too intense, and a couple of puffs here and there helps calm me down. I just smoke a 1/4 of it, not all the way down to the filter.

American Spirit yellows. Tastes good.

When I get settled, gonna quit again, and exercise like a maniac to mitigate this lapse...
Try like hell to keep the lapse as brief as possible. The shorter you keep it the easier it will be to get back on track.
Old 4 days ago
  #52
Lives for gear
 
GeminIAm's Avatar
I've started again as well

Ah well fvck it lol
Old 2 days ago
  #53
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnd5412 View Post
eh, never mind. My jokes suck.
I enjoyed it, but my jokes are generally 'niche'.
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