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How do you keep your neck/back in good shape? Virtual Instrument Plugins
Old 9th November 2016
  #1
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The Beatsmith's Avatar
 

How do you keep your neck/back in good shape?

Hi, apologies for the 'boring' topic, but I can't be the first person here to think about this?

I am relatively 'fit' and active - I'm a weightlifter and gym goer, do BJJ, stretch a lot and occasionally run and do yoga (as in, go to a class, as opposed to doing it at home). My posture when standing is pretty good, and when not injured, I can generally 'get away' with less than perfect posture when sitting (for a while). I currently have a shoulder/neck injury that's making me much more aware of my posture when sitting. I even put a webcam on to watch myself, and wasn't too happy with how I looked when I was 'relaxed'!

10-12+ hours a day sitting at a computer mixing/editing, playing guitar/keyboard is taking it's toll on my posture.

I have a cheap back support thing which I have on my ****ty $50 Ikea chair, which helps a little.

How do you guys manage all that sitting all day? Do you have a $5000 chair that massages your back/shoulders/neck? Do you sit on a workout ball all day?

Yes, regular breaks (i.e. standing up not social media!) and walks are good, but still. Sometimes you have to put in a long session, though, obviously.

How YOU doin'?

Cheers!

Ed

Last edited by The Beatsmith; 13th November 2016 at 04:31 PM..
Old 9th November 2016
  #2
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Unclenny's Avatar
I have old injuries that present themselves as lower back problems now that I am...older.

I have a desk job now. During the day I move all the time.....bluetooth headset.......stretching......limbering while I do my thing. I see this chair as my nemesis.



Oh.....and headstands morning and night to use gravity to loosen things.......
Old 9th November 2016
  #3
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The Beatsmith's Avatar
 

Haha! Headstands and handstands unfortunately compress the spine the other way! Ideally, I would *love* to find somewhere to hang from my feet with one of those 'machines' or with the moon boots attached to a bar. You can do it at the gym by hanging on the bar with your knees (or a tree), but you will look like a complete ********* if anyone sees you.

I suffered from 'sciatica' for approx 10-15 years which I thought was unfixable without surgery. That was until I realised that my hip flexors were so tight from sitting all day! Doing sports that require me to be flexible have helped a lot to raise awareness of all the imbalances that I/most people have, but ideally I'd pay for a sports physio assessment... that's very expensive, though, unfortunately.

I mean, I could buy gear with that cash, you know? And by gear, i mean food, petrol and rent.

Still, a good chair might not be a ridiculous idea.
Old 9th November 2016
  #4
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lynngraber's Avatar
I invested in the "not so glamorous" gear. Got a fully loaded Herman Miller Aeron and a 3m sit stand fully adjustable keyboard tray. Back and wrist pain was gone after a few weeks. No pressure nodes on my ass anymore either.


The $1200 or so I spent on these items is easily recouped by saved visits to chiro.
Old 9th November 2016
  #5
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Unclenny's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Beatsmith View Post
Haha! Headstands and handstands unfortunately compress the spine the other way!
Good point. I actually use them more for flushing things out and improving general blood flow.

+1 for a good chair.

Old 9th November 2016
  #6
I have a partially herniated disc and a couple of bulging discs in my lower spine. I was having a lot of pain, specially while doing simple house chores like vacuuming or when washing the car by hand.

I was told by the physical therapist that what was needed to achieve relief was to strengthen the body's core. After beginning and maintaining a weekly exercise routine, the pain that had plagued me for many many long years vanished.

I regularly do sit-ups on an incline ab board, vertical knee raises, ab crunches, and roman chair exercises. This routine has been miraculous for me. I still have to be careful and abstain from doing very heavy lifting.

Something else that imperative for good posture, is the use of an ergonomic chair specially if you are in a prolonged sitting position for extended hours.

One of the GS mbrs, posted some outstanding desk chairs that he was considering buying.

Herman Miller: Aeron, Mirra 2, Embody

Steelcase: Amia, Leap V2, Gesture

Cheers!
Old 10th November 2016
  #7
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Old 10th November 2016
  #8
I have an inversion table in my studio (a table that tips upside down with your ankles clamped). I got it in Australia for $150 on ebay.
Old 10th November 2016
  #9
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On an office chair at a computer desk most of the day, every day. At a job that requires me to really focus on details on the monitors. meaning my posture is probably not very good.... leaning forward.

I try to keep my body hydrated with water. I try to get professional massages when I can, luckily I have a friend who's trained.
I walk alot, and I walk fast, and try to focus on posture. Sleep or lay down on a nice firm bed with a good pillow.

The thing is, we probably don't have a choice to be at a desk these days, but you do have some control over your body posture away from the desk.
We do have this one girl at work, who had the company order a standing desk, so there is a chance your company will do that for you. I personally am not sold on the idea of standing all day. Yet.
Old 13th November 2016
  #10
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I don't.

Old 13th November 2016
  #11
Take regular breaks and go to the gym.
Old 13th November 2016
  #12
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i think i ruined my body more when I was going to the gym.
Old 13th November 2016
  #13
Quote:
Originally Posted by smoke View Post
i think i ruined my body more when I was going to the gym.
No pain, no gain.
Old 13th November 2016
  #14
Gear Guru
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by macgyver View Post
I have an inversion table in my studio (a table that tips upside down with your ankles clamped). I got it in Australia for $150 on ebay.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Beatsmith
Haha! Headstands and handstands unfortunately compress the spine the other way! Ideally, I would *love* to find somewhere to hang from my feet with one of those 'machines' or with the moon boots attached to a bar.
A friend of mine who has a bad back got one of these and said it was a great help. They start around $100

Old 13th November 2016
  #15
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My sister teaches Alexander Technique. It is really excellent for improving your posture and the "use" of your back. So many of our problems come from bad form. improper use, lack of balance and the 'favoring' of weaker muscles. When your bones and your muscles work together, you can avoid problems.

The technique is very soothing and relaxing, but the main purpose of it is to train your body to 'go back' to its proper (instinctive) balance. So a session with an Alexander teacher is considered a "lesson" and not a "treatment".


I also use an Aeron chair. IMO, no chair is 'magic' but the important part is that the chair can be changed throughout the day, so you are not always sitting the same.

another thing I find handy is a Theracane, it's a hook shaped thing you can use to loosen up knots in your back. There are also stretching exercises you can do with it. I learned about it from a piano player who uses one to warm up for gigs and recordings.

Old 15th November 2016
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smoke View Post
i think i ruined my body more when I was going to the gym.
+1
Old 15th November 2016
  #17
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The Beatsmith's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by smoke View Post
i think i ruined my body more when I was going to the gym.
Sounds like you guys are doing it wrong goof

I had a specific injury which was causing some neck pain, normally I'm fine, but am always looking to improve health and stay healthier for longer.

I'm going to keep an eye open on a second hand Aeron chair in the new year, and am going to try to at least have a 'go' on an inversion table and see how I feel!

Cheers,

Ed
Old 15th November 2016
  #18
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The Beatsmith's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joeq View Post
My sister teaches Alexander Technique. It is really excellent for improving your posture and the "use" of your back. So many of our problems come from bad form. improper use, lack of balance and the 'favoring' of weaker muscles. When your bones and your muscles work together, you can avoid problems.

The technique is very soothing and relaxing, but the main purpose of it is to train your body to 'go back' to its proper (instinctive) balance. So a session with an Alexander teacher is considered a "lesson" and not a "treatment".


I also use an Aeron chair. IMO, no chair is 'magic' but the important part is that the chair can be changed throughout the day, so you are not always sitting the same.

another thing I find handy is a Theracane, it's a hook shaped thing you can use to loosen up knots in your back. There are also stretching exercises you can do with it. I learned about it from a piano player who uses one to warm up for gigs and recordings.

That looks great - have you tried a 'peanut'? Basically tape two tennis balls together and you have yourself a wonderful torture device! You place it between each 'rib'/vertebrae and do, say 5 sit-ups (for the lower back) or 5 bridges (upper back) - great way to really get in there. Painful, but a wonderful pain. Check out the uploaded pics (not mine, found on net).

You can use 1 tennis ball for specific areas, or lacrosse balls if tennis balls are too soft for you

There are some really great things on Kelly Starrett has some great videos on his MobilityWod channel: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...NUy7bahGJzLQbT

Cheers!
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Last edited by The Beatsmith; 15th November 2016 at 05:11 PM..
Old 15th November 2016
  #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Beatsmith View Post
That looks great - have you tried a 'peanut'? Basically tape two tennis balls together and you have yourself a wonderful torture device! You place it between each 'rib'/vertebrae and do, say 5 sit-ups (for the lower back) or 5 bridges (upper back) - great way to really get in there. Painful, but a wonderful pain. Check out the uploaded pics (not mine, found on net).

You can use 1 tennis ball for specific areas, or lacrosse balls if tennis balls are too soft for you worried

There are some really great things on Kelly Starrett has some great videos on his MobilityWod channel: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...NUy7bahGJzLQbT

Cheers!
I never tried the peanut.
I had a client who was making a workout tape, and she gave me some smaller balls ranging from about an inch to three inches across. They were very dense rubber, more like mini-lacrosse balls, and the idea was you would stand on them (one foot at at time!) and roll them around and give yourself a foot massage. Works pretty well.
Old 15th November 2016
  #20
I avoid extreme sports and always wear a helmet.
Old 15th November 2016
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Beatsmith View Post
Sounds like you guys are doing it wrong goof
Cmon man why assume that? Even tho your probably joking... or maybe not

I'm 40. I got hurt a few times playing 5 years o contact football running back in my teens. You hurt one thing, you start to compensate your entire life.

I know how to lift weights. I'm not going to make this a brag thread about my lifting. It takes a toll on your body after awhile.

Heck a year ago I was playing football in Brooklyn and got stretched in the wrong places again.

Just because your body gets old, does not mean you 'did' it wrong.
Old 15th November 2016
  #22
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The Beatsmith's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by smoke View Post
Cmon man why assume that? Even tho your probably joking... or maybe not

I'm 40. I got hurt a few times playing 5 years o contact football running back in my teens. You hurt one thing, you start to compensate your entire life.

I know how to lift weights. I'm not going to make this a brag thread about my lifting. It takes a toll on your body after awhile.

Heck a year ago I was playing football in Brooklyn and got stretched in the wrong places again.

Just because your body gets old, does not mean you 'did' it wrong.
Yes, I was kind of joking as you didn't really expand on your point, but:

Sure, injuries can (will?) happen if you push yourself. But to make out like NOT going to the gym is somehow better than going (because they'll get injured), is not something I agree with. Training and becoming stronger is by far better than not, in my opinion.

Also, your injuries are clearly from playing football in your teens, not from going to the gym, really.

I know plenty of people who are over 40 and can easily squat 2x bodyweight. Maintaining leg strength is a huge indicator on health when you're in your twilight years!

I personally would rather the thread encourages people to go to the gym, not tell them to avoid it as they'll inevitably get hurt

Cheers,

Ed
Old 15th November 2016
  #23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synth Guru View Post
I was told by the physical therapist that what was needed to achieve relief was to strengthen the body's core.
+1. Once you get going and you stay consistent a routine can work wonders, in my experience. Try to make a little time to start running, if possible. Doesn't require much startup (get some good shoes) and it's as easy as stepping out of your door. Finish your run and drop down for pushups and crunches, etc. Pretty simple routine that'll make you feel great.

+1 on Aerons as mentioned above as well. That's why you see them in so many studios (which was a queue from the business world).

Power up!
Old 15th November 2016
  #24
Quote:
Originally Posted by batlanyard View Post
+1. Once you get going and you stay consistent a routine can work wonders, in my experience. Try to make a little time to start running, if possible. Doesn't require much startup (get some good shoes) and it's as easy as stepping out of your door. Finish your run and drop down for pushups and crunches, etc. Pretty simple routine that'll make you feel great.

+1 on Aerons as mentioned above as well. That's why you see them in so many studios (which was a queue from the business world).

Power up!
Already implemented. I run (low impact on an elliptical & Adaptive Motion Trainer) 3 times per week. Great for the ticker too. I'm also doing crunches, situps, and vertical knee raises for core strength and stability of the lower spine. Can't do push ups though, due to a shoulder injury.

One thing I forgot to mention, is the use of Triple Flex for the joints. Great stuff!
Old 15th November 2016
  #25
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Unclenny's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by batlanyard View Post
Try to make a little time to start running, if possible. Doesn't require much startup (get some good shoes) and it's as easy as stepping out of your door.
In my experience, staying active is important if you have manageable back issues. I have led an active life that was also one that left me with lingering injuries.....construction work most of my life and many years at the dojo.

When I hit 60 I had a Forrest Gump moment and started running for the first time in my life. Before that I only ran if someone was chasing me or if the beer store was closing.

For the next four years I ran every day....just a few miles (nice and slow) and my back problems were pretty much non-existent. Other leg and hip issues have made me cut back on that now.

Old 15th November 2016
  #26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unclenny View Post
When I hit 60 I had a Forrest Gump moment and started running for the first time in my life. Before that I only ran if someone was chasing me or if the beer store was closing.
Great change to make and understood on the leg/hip issues. Definitely easier to get your body used to it if you start earlier, but hey, great that you're on top of staying active.

Another thing to consider on this as well is that 95% of it is in the mind, not to discount anyone's particular ailments as nonsense, of course. Just what I've found personally over the years (I'm 47).
Old 16th November 2016
  #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Beatsmith View Post
Yes, I was kind of joking as you didn't really expand on your point, but:

Sure, injuries can (will?) happen if you push yourself. But to make out like NOT going to the gym is somehow better than going (because they'll get injured), is not something I agree with. Training and becoming stronger is by far better than not, in my opinion.

Also, your injuries are clearly from playing football in your teens, not from going to the gym, really.

I know plenty of people who are over 40 and can easily squat 2x bodyweight. Maintaining leg strength is a huge indicator on health when you're in your twilight years!

I personally would rather the thread encourages people to go to the gym, not tell them to avoid it as they'll inevitably get hurt

Cheers,

Ed
"I think ruined MY body more when I was going to the gym"

vs "You guys should be careful about going to the gym"

I mean, we are mostly adults here that can read the difference between these?
Old 16th November 2016
  #28
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The Beatsmith's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by smoke View Post
"I think ruined MY body more when I was going to the gym"

vs "You guys should be careful about going to the gym"

I mean, we are mostly adults here that can read the difference between these?
In any case, thanks for your valuable and positive contributions to the thread
Old 16th November 2016
  #29
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The Beatsmith's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Synth Guru View Post
Already implemented. I run (low impact on an elliptical & Adaptive Motion Trainer) 3 times per week. Great for the ticker too. I'm also doing crunches, situps, and vertical knee raises for core strength and stability of the lower spine. Can't do push ups though, due to a shoulder injury.

One thing I forgot to mention, is the use of Triple Flex for the joints. Great stuff!
Running is great (although I do find it a little boring) - I am lucky enough to live somewhere a little hill-y, so if I can't get to the gym I usually run hills/do hill sprints. But it's getting pretty cold and wet in the UK and I hate that feeling of sucking in that cold air into your lungs - it actually makes it... hard to breathe!

I live in the rainiest city in the UK (I think... which is saying something)... maybe that's why we suck at beach volleyball?
Old 16th November 2016
  #30
I think there's a lot of misconceptions about the benefits of going to the gym and implementing physical fitness plan into one's daily life.

Most people envision that going to the gym is only for building muscle mass and that by doing so, will turn their bodies into a Hulk Hogan or an Arnold Swarzennegger. Nothing could be further from the truth. Sure, working out with heavy weights will ultimately result in building muscle mass however, most people fail to see the other benefits of a work out.

No physical fitness and living a 100% sedentary life style, whether at work or after work by continued sitting on the couch will have severe consequences over time.

As one ages, the body begins to lose flexibility and bones begin to lose their density. My father is now in his early eighties, overweight, and struggles to stand up from a sitting position. He's developed high blood pressure and type II diabetes, two conditions that can be avoided and managed without medications by the implementation of a fitness plan. Exercise burns calories and maintains a healthy body weight. Additionally, a full body workout plan will help to maintain the body, joints, and ligaments in a state of adequate flexibility.

No one is saying that you have to kill yourself to achieve this, but a weekly physical exercise plan is imperative for optimal health. I cannot stress enough, the importance of a cardio plan, either by walking or by jogging/running. It helps the heart muscles to stay strong and keep that blood circulating. By increasing the heart rate it gives the body organs extra oxygen to burn calories, fat, and keeps the body flexible. Even while at rest, you'll be burning more calories than before.

Is it uncomfortable? Does it make you feel sore when moving around? These are some of the reasons people are turned off by physical fitness, so they turn to their comfy chairs and fluffy plush couch because it's less work. This is too how I once believed, but I made the decision to change.

It's hard at the beginning, you will be uncomfortable and will have a degree of soreness and pain after exercising, but it'll go away after a few days to a week as the body begins to become stronger and develop resistance. After a few weeks you'll begin to feel better and over the course of months you'll begin to see the benefits of reduced weight and increased flexibility. The important thing, is to keep the body moving on a daily basis.

Don't believe me? I challenge you to try.
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