The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Hairball Audio 1176 compressors Dynamics Processors (HW)
Old 9th September 2011
  #31
Gear Head
 
_cake's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob G View Post
I love your optimism and it probably is fun to learn but I truly just want to make music and have this tool to make it a better experience for myself!
Alas, i have a bit of spare time here and there and not much $$$, so the arrangement worked well for me!

A great tool it is, i hope you are able to get hold of one (or two or more!!!), good luck in your hunt!
Old 9th September 2011
  #32
Lives for gear
 
claend's Avatar
 

Hey folks,

Is there any step by step guide on how to populate and build the design?

I'd love to build a pair of Rev A for myself, I can use a solder iron, but I have not a solid electronic background and need some type of guide.

Any info will be much appreciated.


Carlos
Old 9th September 2011
  #33
Gear Head
 
_cake's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by claend View Post
Hey folks,

Is there any step by step guide on how to populate and build the design?

I'd love to build a pair of Rev A for myself, I can use a solder iron, but I have not a solid electronic background and need some type of guide.

Any info will be much appreciated.


Carlos
This thread is the best place for this http://www.prodigy-pro.com/diy/index.php?topic=29981.0

Basic how to with populating is to start with the small parts (resistors, diodes etc) and work your way up to the bigger parts (capacitors etc).

If you had "everything" infront of you it would only take a few hours to build and get going (assuming you did everything correct!).
Old 9th September 2011
  #34
Lives for gear
 
claend's Avatar
 

Thanks a lot!!

I've just had a quick look to the first 4 pages and I'm not sure I will be able to do this project... I wouldn't know were to place the first resistor ;-) Guess I need to read all of it!
Old 9th September 2011
  #35
Gear Guru
 
Karloff70's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by claend View Post
Thanks a lot!!

I've just had a quick look to the first 4 pages and I'm not sure I will be able to do this project... I wouldn't know were to place the first resistor ;-) Guess I need to read all of it!
Have faith! I built a G7 valve mic point to point without ANY electronics experience......seemed possible and was, only you have to persevere and find the solution to the next question....but the prodigy forum is full of helpful guys to hand those solutions to you when asked specific questions and then you learn and get the thing built....all you have to do is commit and buy it, then you'll have to....lol.....and it hasn't even got lethal voltages in it heh
Old 9th September 2011
  #36
Lives for gear
 
claend's Avatar
 

I like your philosophy!

And the mouser part list (rev. A): 225P15491XD3 Vishay/Sprague Polyester kondensatoren

Seems to be only missing this polycap: 225P15491XD3 Vishay/Sprague Polyester kondensatoren

It shouldn't be that hard to source I guess. Time to undust my tester?! heh

BTW, OP sorry about derrailing you thread.
Old 9th September 2011
  #37
Gear Maniac
 
Bob G's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by claend View Post
I like your philosophy!

And the mouser part list (rev. A): 225P15491XD3 Vishay/Sprague Polyester kondensatoren

Seems to be only missing this polycap: 225P15491XD3 Vishay/Sprague Polyester kondensatoren

It shouldn't be that hard to source I guess. Time to undust my tester?! heh

BTW, OP sorry about derrailing you thread.
You're not really derailing anything, just adding your thoughts and ideas pertaining to yourself.

I've read through the entire thread over at the group DIY forum and I have to say that as much help as there is, I know from past experience when it's time to leave a job to someone who knows what they are doing and for me, there are too many varibables that could cause me to make a mistake or set the build project back days or have me buying more parts that I've missed or ones that are not correct when you look at the original design schematics. There are some errors in what the kits provide and several EE's have pointed this out but knowing how to properly assess those changes is something for a professional.
Old 9th September 2011
  #38
Gear Guru
 
Karloff70's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob G View Post
....... but knowing how to properly assess those changes is something for a professional.
....which there are plenty of on prodigy, all very helpful indeed.....just saying. It's not rocket science. Not like you need to design the thing.....
Old 9th September 2011
  #39
Lives for gear
 
MicDaddy's Avatar
 

FWIW I did use the Hairball BOM twice, and I think but for one film cap going obsolete, it was 100% complete.

And I'll reiterate what others have said, the Prodigy forum is full of Genius EE types. I don't recommend you go into it expecting someone to hold your hand through your build, but it happens over there a lot myself included.

Photo of the shootout after the first one was finished.
Attached Thumbnails
Hairball Audio 1176 compressors-revavsua.jpg  
Old 9th September 2011
  #40
Lives for gear
 
dandeurloo's Avatar
Some of the best gear being made comes from that site! Some very talented folks over there. Not a site for hand holding at all. However, they are very helpful.
Old 9th September 2011
  #41
Lives for gear
 
MicDaddy's Avatar
 

...and if I can say Dan makes some Beautiful cases for a lot of the projects over there at Prodigy
Old 9th September 2011
  #42
Lives for gear
 
David R.'s Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by _cake View Post
This thread is the best place for this 1176 Rev A - Back to the beginning...

Basic how to with populating is to start with the small parts (resistors, diodes etc) and work your way up to the bigger parts (capacitors etc).

If you had "everything" infront of you it would only take a few hours to build and get going (assuming you did everything correct!).
Ummm, no. And no. Mnats designed the board to be in sections, you should complete each section and test for continuity before moving on. It takes way more than a few hours, especially if it is your first build. It took more than a few hours to make sure I had the power supply right.

This was my first project since building Heathkit stuff as a kid. It took a long time, and really should take a long time because you want to understand what you are doing and have a working unit at the end.
Old 9th September 2011
  #43
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by David R. View Post
It took a long time, and really should take a long time because you want to understand what you are doing and have a working unit at the end.
David, care to estimate your build time?
Old 9th September 2011
  #44
I did mine in a couple evenings. But, it turned out that I had a bad t-pad, and didn't know this for a while. So I spent multiple more evenings trying to figure out why I couldn't get it to calibrate right. Finally I traced it down to that and Hairball sent me a new t-pad and I got it right. Oh, and I also used out of date info and hooked up the transformer wires wrong and smoked a resistor in the power section and had to replace that.

There's now a much better guide on the Hairball site that would have made my life infinitely easier when I was doing it. The problem with Prodigy is that there's all kinds of out of date info floating around, and those of us who aren't experts have a very hard time figuring out what's relevant and what's not. I looked at the new Hairball guide and it was vastly better. Nothign close to what Drip provides for their stuff, but vastly better than the info I had.

I also chose to do the rotary version instead of the pushbutton, which added complications since most of the info was for the pushbutton one. Since I was doing my own hand cut case, doing the button slots seemed a little too difficult for me. Drilling round holes for rotary knobs is far easier. If you can afford it, just buy a pre-done case. Often doing the case yourself can take longer than putting the electronics together.
Old 9th September 2011
  #45
Lives for gear
 
MicDaddy's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean Roddey View Post
Often going the case can take longer than putting the electronics together.
Ditto, I've learned my lesson drilling/cutting 2mm steel

I'll stick to the soldering iron and let the machine guys do what they do best.
Old 9th September 2011
  #46
Lives for gear
 
David R.'s Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drBill View Post
David, care to estimate your build time?
I refuse to anwer on the grounds that I might embarass myself. heh

I will say that after chasing down a bad connection, my rev D works like a charm.
Old 9th September 2011
  #47
Gear Maniac
 
Stéphane's Avatar
how to calibrate the unit when it's finished? Difficult?
Old 9th September 2011
  #48
Lives for gear
Mnats website has videos for step by step calibration. Easy peasy
Old 10th September 2011
  #49
Gear Guru
 
drBill's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by David R. View Post
I refuse to anwer on the grounds that I might embarass myself. heh

I will say that after chasing down a bad connection, my rev D works like a charm.
heh heh Fair enough!
Old 10th September 2011
  #50
Gear Maniac
 
Bob G's Avatar
 

Who are the people building these to sell on ebay?
Old 10th September 2011
  #51
Gear Head
 
_cake's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by David R. View Post
Ummm, no. And no. Mnats designed the board to be in sections, you should complete each section and test for continuity before moving on. It takes way more than a few hours, especially if it is your first build. It took more than a few hours to make sure I had the power supply right.

This was my first project since building Heathkit stuff as a kid. It took a long time, and really should take a long time because you want to understand what you are doing and have a working unit at the end.
I'm no expert and the first point sounds like a good idea, i just never had a problem so i never asked for a better way to build. But still small to big. You don't want to be putting a soldering iron near parts to put in a resistor between two big caps or something like that!

First time builders will want to take their time. I suggested that people who haven't done this buy a couple cheap diy kits from an electronics store to practice.

I did research this before starting but wouldn't have spent more than a few hours building and testing in the end, but thats me and i don't feel i rushed it and i have a nice working piece of gear. I guess, the point between us is, be comfortable at the pace you a going.

PS - i tell a lie, i did have a problem. Don't let small screws sneak in under the pcb

Quote:
Who are the people building these to sell on ebay?
Bob there is a for sale section on prodigy pro - it may or may not be worth a look there. i haven't had a look lately.
Old 10th September 2011
  #52
Lives for gear
 
abechap024's Avatar
 

The boards are great, and when you look at each section of the PCB it gets very simple...

Kinda like a puzzle, if its your first time doing a 100 piece puzzle, you look at ALL the pieces anyone is going to feel intimidated and a little worried about completing it. But if you just take it a piece at a time and work through it...heck you might even enjoy yourself!

And as a matter of chance I just am in the middle of soldering 4 1176 boards myself, 2 for me and 2 for a friend...

It does get fun...I almost find it relaxing now...

Go get a PCB, and do it!

If nothing else you will learn a little bit and when you are finished these units sound fantastic.

Calibration is a peice of cake...its all outlined in the urei original manual and the unit will stilll sound fine uncalibrated. (calibration just changes threshold level, and meter, also a THD adjustment)


OH! And its good to be a cheap skate and save money....but please do yourself a favor and BUY A CASE!! Your build can look like heck on the inside, but the better the outside looks the better you will feel and your pleasure will increase by having a nice pre-labled case. The hours spent drilling and sanding and drilling and sanding your own rack mount case is not worth the 50$ you will save and all you will have to show (at best) for your long investment is a plain looking case....
Old 10th September 2011
  #53
Lives for gear
 
Telefunk's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by abechap024 View Post
The boards are great, and when you look at each section of the PCB it gets very simple...

Kinda like a puzzle, if its your first time doing a 100 piece puzzle, you look at ALL the pieces anyone is going to feel intimidated and a little worried about completing it. But if you just take it a piece at a time and work through it...heck you might even enjoy yourself!

And as a matter of chance I just am in the middle of soldering 4 1176 boards myself, 2 for me and 2 for a friend...

It does get fun...I almost find it relaxing now...

Go get a PCB, and do it!

If nothing else you will learn a little bit and when you are finished these units sound fantastic.

Calibration is a peice of cake...its all outlined in the urei original manual and the unit will stilll sound fine uncalibrated. (calibration just changes threshold level, and meter, also a THD adjustment)


OH! And its good to be a cheap skate and save money....but please do yourself a favor and BUY A CASE!! Your build can look like heck on the inside, but the better the outside looks the better you will feel and your pleasure will increase by having a nice pre-labled case. The hours spent drilling and sanding and drilling and sanding your own rack mount case is not worth the 50$ you will save and all you will have to show (at best) for your long investment is a plain looking case....
Exactly.

My advice is, also, to buy the case. You will save a lot of time there.

I did 3 of my 1176's of my 4 all quite fast. The first one took much longer of course, but this didnt exist then: Loading...

The last two I made in about few evenings. The main board takes about few hours if you're very very careful what you're doing: double checking all resistors with a meter etc. but it pays in the end. When I powered them for the first time they worked like charm immediately, just had to do the calibration, which is a piece of cake.

Just buy the pcb and do it!
Old 10th September 2011
  #54
Lives for gear
 
TornadoTed's Avatar
I should have 2x Rev D and a Blue Stripe finished in the next week or so. I am very low on electronics theory but I get by. I think anyone who is patient, can solder neatly and follow instructions can build one of these.
Old 10th September 2011
  #55
Gear Maniac
 
Stéphane's Avatar
Thanks for the info!
Can I order everything to build a 1176 at Hairball or there are some missing part that I have to order somewhere else like drip?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Louis Bernstone View Post
Mnats website has videos for step by step calibration. Easy peasy
Old 10th September 2011
  #56
Lives for gear
I hate to be a killjoy, but technically they are Mnats 1176's.. He designed the pcb (obviously from the 1176 schems)

Just wanted to give credit where it's due.

Hairball sells the hard to find bits (enclosures, vu's , input and output transformers, attenuators , push buttons and knobs)

Mnats sells the pcb's

Mouser / digikey / whoever - sells boring bits like resistors, caps , transistors etc...

All this info is at prodigy pro.

I've built 2x 1176's rev D's and helped a few mates build theirs. Great units.

Typically $500 per unit + time.
Old 11th September 2011
  #57
Gear Maniac
 
Bob G's Avatar
 

MNATS 1176's. Sorry. You are correct. Hairball making things pretty.

I think Hairball should get the faceplates silkscreened with "Limiting Amplifier" or something to make them look even more legit. Lord knows, UA isn't going to make anything close to an original Urei so MNATS and Hairball should just take over that market and hire a decent manufacturer to assemble these so anyone can get one.
Old 11th September 2011
  #58
Quote:
Hairball should just take over that market and hire a decent manufacturer to assemble these so anyone can get one.
The gotcha is that you suddenly figure out why that something that only costs you $500 to build costs $2000 when you buy them off the shelf. You are opening a whole other can of worms once you get into the business of selling finished boxes. Suddenly you have to maintain a lot of infrastructure, support people, inventory, manufacturing space and personnel, meet payroll every week, etc...
Old 11th September 2011
  #59
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by abechap024 View Post
The boards are great, and when you look at each section of the PCB it gets very simple...

Kinda like a puzzle, if its your first time doing a 100 piece puzzle, you look at ALL the pieces anyone is going to feel intimidated and a little worried about completing it. But if you just take it a piece at a time and work through it...heck you might even enjoy yourself!

And as a matter of chance I just am in the middle of soldering 4 1176 boards myself, 2 for me and 2 for a friend...

It does get fun...I almost find it relaxing now...

Go get a PCB, and do it!

If nothing else you will learn a little bit and when you are finished these units sound fantastic.

Calibration is a peice of cake...its all outlined in the urei original manual and the unit will stilll sound fine uncalibrated. (calibration just changes threshold level, and meter, also a THD adjustment)


OH! And its good to be a cheap skate and save money....but please do yourself a favor and BUY A CASE!! Your build can look like heck on the inside, but the better the outside looks the better you will feel and your pleasure will increase by having a nice pre-labled case. The hours spent drilling and sanding and drilling and sanding your own rack mount case is not worth the 50$ you will save and all you will have to show (at best) for your long investment is a plain looking case....

let's not discount Abe's awesome compresser projects from the discussion!

looking forward to my 176 vari-mu!
Old 11th September 2011
  #60
Gear Maniac
 
Stéphane's Avatar
As a beginner on a 1176 kit, which good soldering iron station would you recommend me to buy guys?
Any serious brands?
Thanks.
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump