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XLR pin out?
Old 30th April 2005
  #1
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Hiwatt's Avatar
 

XLR pin out?

Ok I'm sitting down to sodder some male xlr to male xlr patch cables and I've forgotten the pin out...


pin 1 = ground
pin 2 = hot
pin 3 = cold

I think???
Old 30th April 2005
  #2
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Tim Farrant's Avatar
 

You are correct Sir!
Old 30th April 2005
  #3
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Hiwatt's Avatar
 

Thanks Tim
Old 30th April 2005
  #4


But some units (like the old Yama SPX-90) were wired pin 3 hot....

I guess i don't matter if you never go unbalanced.



-tINY

Old 1st May 2005
  #5
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Jim vanBergen's Avatar
 

some older gear will be wired WRONG. You must keep your signals balanced and test I/O for safety's sake.
Pin 2 HOT, hot hot!!
Old 1st May 2005
  #6
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The BBC used to use pin 3 hot. When I was working for our TV network here in NZ, the whole place was pin 3 hot, but American equipment was pin 2 hot. Looks like the yanks won again!

(Tiny, the SPX-90 is 1/4" jack in/out, no XLR's on that beast).

Cheers
Tim.
Old 1st May 2005
  #7
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How odd! When I was a "baby" here in the USA in the early 70's, I was drilled "pin 3 hot!", which was the Ampex recorder standard. As years went by, we encountered European gear wired pin 2 hot, so we called that the "euro standard". Of course, in 2005, pin 2 hot is an IEC or AES (or whatever) standard.

In the 1980's, it was such a mess that someone at an AES convention was giving away a "game spinner" with a scale marked into "pie sections" as "pin 2" "pin 3" "pin 2" "pin 3". I think I may still have that funny bit of swag around here somewhere...

Bri
Old 2nd May 2005
  #8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Farrant
(Tiny, the SPX-90 is 1/4" jack in/out, no XLR's on that beast).

I checked and you are right. It must have been another piece of gear or a wiring problems somewhere else...

I do remember a guy running a gig outdoors who couldn't get reverb on the vocal without making it all reverb an no signal. I wandered back and, yes, the mix control on the unit was half way from "dry" to "wet" (or whatever it was labeled). It was a great effect if done on purpose (and sparingly...). Not what this guy was after, though.



-tINY

Old 2nd May 2005
  #9
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Tim Farrant's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by brianroth
How odd! When I was a "baby" here in the USA in the early 70's, I was drilled "pin 3 hot!", which was the Ampex recorder standard. As years went by, we encountered European gear wired pin 2 hot, so we called that the "euro standard". Of course, in 2005, pin 2 hot is an IEC or AES (or whatever) standard.

In the 1980's, it was such a mess that someone at an AES convention was giving away a "game spinner" with a scale marked into "pie sections" as "pin 2" "pin 3" "pin 2" "pin 3". I think I may still have that funny bit of swag around here somewhere...

Bri
Yes, I think you might be right about the Euro thing - so it wasn't the Yanks after all!

I do recall however the BBC standard because everything we did at the TV Station was to "BBC Standard righto-then-what"

Tim.
Old 2nd May 2005
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Farrant
Yes, I think you might be right about the Euro thing - so it wasn't the Yanks after all!

I do recall however the BBC standard because everything we did at the TV Station was to "BBC Standard righto-then-what"

Tim.
So, I wonder if the Beeb was following the Ampex standard??? And, where did Studer stand in all of this??

Bri
Old 2nd May 2005
  #11
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Bob Olhsson's Avatar
 

The first gear that ever used an XLR for line level was the Ampex tape recorder in the late 1940s. They arbitrarily chose pin 3 to be hot. Meanwhile an international standards body had created a universal wiring standard for all electrical connectors that dictated that pin 2 should be "hot." Many people continued to use the Ampex standard because adopting the international standard would mean coming up with a budget for rewiring their entire facility while it was a simple matter to rewire any new gear that didn't conform as part of the installation expense.

In the '60s we had the absurd situation of most mikes being wired pin 2 hot and most line level gear wired pin 3 hot. I have a Sony time code DAT machine that has the audio wired pin 2 hot while the time code input is unbalanced and wired pin 3 hot!

It all came to a head with the introduction of PC board mount XLR connectors and the manufacturers elected to have the international standard finally become an AES standard.
Old 2nd May 2005
  #12
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Tim Farrant's Avatar
 

...and then there was the Shure Mixers that used male XLR for input and female XLR for output! . ...who knows what was running thru their heads!

Tim.
Old 2nd May 2005
  #13
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I have a Summit DCL-200 that is pin 3 hot.

I also noted that almost all of my gear is marked on the back.





D
Old 2nd May 2005
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Farrant
Yes, I think you might be right about the Euro thing - so it wasn't the Yanks after all!

I do recall however the BBC standard because everything we did at the TV Station was to "BBC Standard righto-then-what"

Tim.
Hi

At Neve the standard was pin 2 hot except for a few reversals which (straining the memory back 30 years) was, I believe, RTE and the usual culprits across the pond.

It doesn't really matter provided nothing swaps over in the middle that you have access to.

Pin 3 in = Pin 3 out, Pin 2 in = Pin 2 out.

Old 3rd May 2005
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Farrant
...and then there was the Shure Mixers that used male XLR for input and female XLR for output! . ...who knows what was running thru their heads!
Most built-in PA systems (such as schools) that were let out for bids were wired backwards because the male wall connectors were cheaper.
Old 3rd May 2005
  #16
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rainsinvelvet's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Olhsson
Most built-in PA systems (such as schools) that were let out for bids were wired backwards because the male wall connectors were cheaper.
I have seen this problem several times lately as there gear needs replacing.

ERic
Old 3rd May 2005
  #17
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In the schools, having male inputs on the mixer/amp had an additional advantage in that the mic *cords* were female-female and thus idiot-proof. <g>

Bri
Old 7th June 2014
  #18
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XLR pin out "game spinner"

In the 1980's, it was such a mess that someone at an AES convention was giving away a "game spinner" with a scale marked into "pie sections" as "pin 2" "pin 3" "pin 2" "pin 3". I think I may still have that funny bit of swag around here somewhere…


If you have that, I'd love to get a picture of it for a presentation I'm doing. I'll give you credit!
Old 7th June 2014
  #19
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Well it's now, nine years later. So it may have gone missing.
Old 7th June 2014
  #20
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You must not have google,,,,

JR
Old 9th June 2014
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Farrant View Post
...and then there was the Shure Mixers that used male XLR for input and female XLR for output! . ...who knows what was running thru their heads!

Tim.
Well, that's just electrical safety 101. You always want the power source to be a female connector to minimize the risk of electrocution!
Old 9th June 2014
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnRoberts View Post
You must not have google,,,,
JR
I have no idea how you would ask Google a question like that.
Old 9th June 2014
  #23
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"XLR pin 2 pin 3 AES spinner" got it.

Chris
Old 10th June 2014
  #24
Here for the gear
 

Thank you very much for this John! I tried google but did not hit the right search combo…I was there at that AES convention in LA and I know I got one at the time. Somehow I thought it had a bunch of colors but memory is dim for those details….much appreciated!
Old 10th June 2014
  #25
RPC
Gear Addict
 

Another reason for having male mike connectors on the floor jacks in an institutional environment was that these could easily be vacuumed out when they filled with dust. Female connectors would quickly become unmateable.
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