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Lexicon PCM 80 PCM 90 Repairs
Old 24th September 2014
  #61
Here for the gear
 

Hi,

I've got a (new old stock) Futuba display for pcm 80 & 81 vs pcm 91 & 92 for sale.
If someone needs it, you can contact me...
Thanks

David
Old 13th April 2015
  #62
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Hi,

my PCM 80, doesn't start up properly it says, E4, do you happen to know what this means? its turns on and works about 1/3 of the time.. every other time is just says e4...
Old 15th April 2015
  #63
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Demonslave's Avatar
Lexicon screens AVAILABLE NOW!

Hi everyone I have a line on some PCM 80 screens if we could do a group buy. There are 16 available and with the group buy the screens would be 160 each!
Email me at
[email protected]
Old 21st April 2015
  #64
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rtype909's Avatar
Just taken some bad caps off my faded display. New ones arrive tomorrow and I'll report back. The caps has electrolytic leaking from inside and one was slightly bulged too.
Old 22nd April 2015
  #65
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rtype909's Avatar
ok my display is back! i'll post of details later on my blog but its a relatively easy fix if you have a SMD heatgun. The caps are big too and you can check if you have a problem by looking inside and seeing if the two big caps on the display board are wobbly. You should get 5v on both caps and -6-7v on the 3.3uf small case tantalum cap.
Old 10th June 2015
  #66
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Can you let me know how much you charge to repair the PCM80? Thanks,
Gordon
[email protected]
Old 22nd June 2015
  #67
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rtype909's Avatar
Ipagross sent you an email but i have not heard further.
Separately, someone has sent me another dead Futaba Display and i'll see if i can revive it and report back.
Old 23rd June 2015
  #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Demonslave View Post
Hi everyone I have a line on some PCM 80 screens if we could do a group buy. There are 16 available and with the group buy the screens would be 160 each!
Email me at
[email protected]
New Displays including the Inverter are available for around $30 bucks dependant on what's required, see the Cult of Eventide forum, for an H3000 display and that same company can send a new display, inverter or fix the old display with a new Blue/Green LCD or LED Display

Regards
TheLastByte
Old 23rd June 2015
  #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nevilleJames17 View Post
Hi,

my PCM 80, doesn't start up properly it says, E4, do you happen to know what this means? its turns on and works about 1/3 of the time.. every other time is just says e4...
Of the top of my head E4 or E7 means the RAM you put into the unit is of the wrong parity - Take out the chips from the Daughterboard, and order 2 units of 4 Meg Simms as per Manual. (Around $40-60 bucks dependant on how many ordered), a tube of 25 can be $100 bucks etc.

Regards
TheLastByte
Old 30th April 2016
  #70
Here for the gear
 

Current Replacement PSU Info for Lexi PCM80,81,91

Artesyn Embedded Technologies Switching Power Supply-NFS40-7610
available at Mouser Electronics. +/- 15VDC and +5VDC-pinout is correct

I just resurrected a PCM80 and a PCM81 that died from a lightening strike.
Old 24th February 2019
  #71
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Transparent green display screen replacement

Hi everyone, bought a faulty PCM 80 (
Now I'm searching for a display filter replacement.
Any tip would be appreciated! Thank you.

Regards
dotted8
Attached Thumbnails
Lexicon PCM 80 PCM 90 Repairs-img_1821.jpg   Lexicon PCM 80 PCM 90 Repairs-img_1822.jpg  
Old 24th February 2019
  #72
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italo de angelis's Avatar
 

Contact Steve Lenham right away
steveatbendentech.co.uk where "at" needs to be changed into @.
Old 24th February 2019
  #73
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italo de angelis's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fusoid View Post
Artesyn Embedded Technologies Switching Power Supply-NFS40-7610
available at Mouser Electronics. +/- 15VDC and +5VDC-pinout is correct

I just resurrected a PCM80 and a PCM81 that died from a lightening strike.
FUSOID

hope you get this...

did you install the NFS40-7610 in your dead PCMs as they are? No changes?
Plug 'n' play sort of thing?

Thanks!
Old 24th February 2019
  #74
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disassembling the front panel

Btw, if anybody is struggling disassembling the front panel...
Attached Thumbnails
Lexicon PCM 80 PCM 90 Repairs-pcm-80-front-off.jpg  
Old 2 weeks ago
  #75
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Lorenzop's Avatar
 

Hi all
As a sort of roundup advice for 2019, just how reliable are these PCM80/81/90 nowadays? Most (older) posts on the net idnicate that it is a "good" unit but readig here it seems the PCM are not so easy to fix if they are faulty, is that correct? Are they full of parts that are not replacable anymore (without cannibalising other pcms?)
Thanks
Old 2 weeks ago
  #76
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italo de angelis's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorenzop View Post
Hi all
As a sort of roundup advice for 2019, just how reliable are these PCM80/81/90 nowadays? Most (older) posts on the net idnicate that it is a "good" unit but readig here it seems the PCM are not so easy to fix if they are faulty, is that correct? Are they full of parts that are not replacable anymore (without cannibalising other pcms?)
Thanks
This is a thread about problems... so it's quite logical you find the dark side of it, all here.
I have a PCM80 bought in 1995, first batch and added a PCM81 from early 2000s.
The first one developed a bad display... it was still usable but it would have probably lasted another couple of years. I had the display changed, buying the part from UK. The 81 had a bad encoder. I changed both encoders, easy to find a compatible part that requires some simple mods.
In general I can say PCM8/9 series are very reliable. And most parts, including the power tranformer, are available. Try getting a sample that has lived a good life and you'll be ok for a long time.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #77
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Lexicon Guts

I once had the pleasure of looking analytically at a Lexicon PCM-80/81 pairing or units literally sandwiched together! Close to one of the best household technical grab everthing to anything handy and the sorting out the problem as this PCM diagnostician found the fault, proved that a certain part was faulting and I laughed bent over thinking to myself a huge effort was involved there!

Whilst there have been numerous incarnations of the Lexicon PCM 80/81/90/91 Effects Units always considering they’ve never been a Studio Favourite due to the deep menu driven interface grab an older Mac or PC laptop dedicated to Midi only as plenty of software exists enabling you to programme the units via screen on computer dumping into System Ex and Midi Real Time messages will be recorded too. Search the Net and you will (if a Synth person) more then likely find 700-1500 minimum operating systems for well known midi equipment and modern FX, Synths to drum boxes and much more? Midi Quest very easy to use!

The Internal Components of the PCM 60/70/80/81/90/91 are actually very well laid out with 1 main Circuit Board and 1 Daughter Board to the PSU unit, the Front Panel Facia and as to replacement parts? Most are bountiful. OLED displays are available to swap in/out the Memory Modules still available as are the correct PSU units and knobs to Encoders and buttoned push-latch, or press once readily available too. These parts simply require you searching them out.

All units prior to the 81/91 using ZIF sockets so no soldering required. Ground yourself to a pipe and you can easily fix them. 81/91 Units have far more Circuitry hard soldered in place! Questions on AD/DA Convertors. Burr Brown now make drop in replacement chips free 8-24 bit and the configuration, clocking applications in SAR and Registers are compatible. No need to sweat finding replacement parts there. They too now exist!

Yes, prices may have gone up with popularity, then again so has a Gretch White Falcon to a Jupiter 8! Plug ins from Soundtoys and the like get you close. Voltage and dialing in, recording those movements and changes in real-time very cool. Yes an 80/81 does a very respectable job re-creating 42/70/60 type Algorithms! Try those... newest Synth sounds minus onboard effects? They do sound pretty ordinary once compared to the 80/81/90/91. On those patches & Midi is your best friend here!

It seems one of the biggest questions asked is a PCM 80 or 81? I personally favour the 80 not 81 thinking the extra memory option very interesting offering once more something that just hasn’t been designed, not even in 2019 for all the betterment in technology. The PCM 80 the “PRIME TIME 4” and no sooner was it changed to 80 as the 480/L was the recipient of the Prime Time cartridge. A quick trip to Italo’s website should offer an insightful lesson into the essential Dual FX and Pitch shift Cards, again different to those programs ready on the 81. Those units literally are synthesisers wrapped up in an FX unit and often this overly complicates thinking! Go and Pro modes are your friends here!

I can remember one Lexicon design Engineer discussing the PCM-80 original beta testing saying “I personally dropped off, 6 Units To Capitol Studios and all the Engineers looked at the box, played around and I asked for feedback 2 weeks later, saying that the Engineers felt it somewhat regrettable these units sounded so great and unfortunately more sounds weren’t available mostly, the Engineers stupefied feeling it, tougher to drive the menus, thinking it easier to punch in a number and get the perfect sound.” I laughed hearing that!

These units take serious effort for rewards. Seems every thing old is now new again especially that which does a very specific task! 42 seconds of Delay Recirculating with Envelope Following to Synth Wave Forms, Delay Lines and the ability to freely build effect and DDL to Reverb structures allowing for almost effect abuse in something crazy in terms of sound design! The 80/81 Reverbs all class and the 91 Reverbs those Algorithmic designs from the 300/M/L to 480/L naturally the more these units are discussed the more valuable!


$3,999 USD was the MRRP when in production and plenty were purchased! Any motivated seller will give codes and serial numbers pics to videos inside and out. Parts still exist for most Lexicon units. Again a motivated seller will accommodate you!

One person’s Junk is always another’s treasure!

TLB
Old 5 days ago
  #78
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Lorenzop's Avatar
 

....Thanks for reply!

On a side note: has anyone tried the new Relab Sonsig Reverb plug????
They seems to make a big deal of its modulation capabilities.
Wonder how it stacks up to PCM80, they say this about it, is it really as innovative as they say? :

"Back in the early hardware days, when memory was incredibly expensive and CPU power was extremely limited, reverb designers had to be incredibly creative and innovative.

Two of their solutions were so ahead of their time that the sound of their reverb algorithms are still cherished today.*

With Sonsig Rev-A, we wanted to capture the essence of those familiar algorithmic reverbs and use modern day processing to take things a step further.

But before we dive into our next Sonsig feature, let's take a quick trip down memory lane and look back at the history of algorithmic reverbs.

Simply put, reverb is the prolongation of sound by reflection from a surface. To simulate this digitally, algorithmic reverbs use a lot of math and DSP horsepower to create a combination of “reflections” with digital delays and some processing “black magic.”

Well sort of…

Let’s unpack this a little more.

Imagine starting with a single delay with a very short delay time (1ms) and a high feedback value (90%) to simulate sound reflections.

Such a sparse resonance density, because it’s only a single delay, would lead to ringing, beating and metallic sounds.

This is because the repeats of a single delay source start to overlap and some frequencies add together (get louder) and some cancel (get quieter).

This is called comb filtering.

If you saw it on a graph, the peaks and valleys resemble the teeth of a comb.

For a reverb decay to sound smooth, you need a uniform and dense decay of ALL frequencies.

This is where it gets a bit more complicated.

To achieve this In the early days you either had to:
Increase memory and CPU to increase the number of delays and delay time.
Introduce Modulation to give the impression of more delays and a higher resonance density in order to mask the artifacts from using a small amount of delay memory.
By using longer delay lengths and tuning them to perfection, the metallic sound was eliminated (to some degree) because the entire frequency bandwidth was now included in the decay.

Although less of a limitation these days, this approach was very expensive back then because you needed more hardware.

Not to mention that the development process was extremely time consuming.

This is one of the main reasons why the early high-end reverbs like the Quantec Room Simulator and Lexicon 480L cost so much.

As for introducing modulation, although basic LFO modulation (essentially a chorus effect) could mask artifacts and produce a very lush and lively chorused sound, which many still love, it ultimately sounded a bit fake and artificial compared to real reverberation.

This was especially true for instruments with few resonances, like piano, where the chorus effect became extremely obvious.

And yes, even though the chorus sound from early reverbs is still a cherished character, most modern day plug-in companies have dared to move beyond this simple LFO-style chorus modulation.

Luckily, we’re not most companies…

With the Sonsig Rev-A Ensemble function, we've pushed the idea of modulated reverb to the limit.

Where traditional reverbs only modulate a single delay line, our ensemble function simulates the Solina ensemble effect which modulates THREE delay lines - this is a first for an algorithmic reverb.

But substituting the chorus with ensemble was simply not enough. We went even further to combine the three simultaneous modulation algorithms in a unique way.

Let’s take a closer look.

Our three modulation algorithms are:
Phase
Ensemble Type 1*
Ensemble Type 2*
When Ensemble is set to ‘0,’ only phase modulation is used to smooth the reverb tail, preventing any audible pitch modulation or “chorus” sound.*

As you start to increase the Ensemble settings, we begin to decrease the phase modulation and introduce our Ensemble Type 1 pitch modulation.*

By setting ‘6,’’ we introduce our Ensemble Type 2 pitch modulation for the smoothest, thickest and most stable reverb tails you’ve ever heard.

Mapped out, the settings look like this:

#0: 100% Phase modulation, 0% Ensemble Type 1, 0% Ensemble Type 2
#1 : 90% Phase modulation, 10% Ensemble Type 1, 0% Ensemble Type 2
#2 : 80% Phase modulation, 20% Ensemble Type 1, 0% Ensemble Type 2
#3 : 70% Phase modulation, 30% Ensemble Type 1, 0% Ensemble Type 2
#4 : 60% Phase modulation, 40% Ensemble Type 1, 0% Ensemble Type 2
#5 : 50% Phase modulation, 50% Ensemble Type 1, 0% Ensemble Type 2
#6 : 40% Phase modulation, 60% Ensemble Type 1, 20% Ensemble Type 2
#7 : 40% Phase modulation, 70% Ensemble Type 1, 40% Ensemble Type 2
#8 : 40% Phase modulation, 80% Ensemble Type 1, 60% Ensemble Type 2
#9 : 40% Phase modulation, 90% Ensemble Type 1, 80% Ensemble Type 2
#1 0: 40% Phase modulation, 100% Ensemble Type 1, 100% Ensemble Type 2

And with our unprecedented Ensemble function, you can create a broad range of reverbs, from the pure and clear sounds of natural, realistic modern spaces to lush vintage, larger-than-life “unreal” spaces like you’ve never heard before.

In our last highlight, we’ll go a bit more in-depth about a few of the other features and inner workings that make Sonsig such a unique and distinctive sounding reverb.

Until then, keep enjoying the plug-in!
Martin"
Old 5 days ago
  #79
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acreil's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorenzop View Post
On a side note: has anyone tried the new Relab Sonsig Reverb plug????
They seems to make a big deal of its modulation capabilities.
Wonder how it stacks up to PCM80, they say this about it, is it really as innovative as they say? :
Modulating a bunch of different things in a reverb isn't a big deal. I've made reverb algorithms with 32 randomly modulated delay lines and I didn't think it was special. It's just marketing.
Old 5 days ago
  #80
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Lorenzop's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by acreil View Post
Modulating a bunch of different things in a reverb isn't a big deal. I've made reverb algorithms with 32 randomly modulated delay lines and I didn't think it was special. It's just marketing.
....am glad that you chimed in!

But Relab´s claim is pretty strong I mean they are saying they have a FIRST on their hands!! How can that be? I know next to nothing about reverbs but even I smell a pooper.... I mean, how can modulating 3 delay line be a first?

"....Where traditional reverbs only modulate a single delay line, our ensemble function simulates the Solina ensemble effect which modulates THREE delay lines - this is a first for an algorithmic reverb."

What do you think ?? What are they talking about
Old 4 days ago
  #81
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acreil's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorenzop View Post
....am glad that you chimed in!

But Relab´s claim is pretty strong I mean they are saying they have a FIRST on their hands!! How can that be? I know next to nothing about reverbs but even I smell a pooper.... I mean, how can modulating 3 delay line be a first?

"....Where traditional reverbs only modulate a single delay line, our ensemble function simulates the Solina ensemble effect which modulates THREE delay lines - this is a first for an algorithmic reverb."

What do you think ?? What are they talking about
He's right that some modulated reverbs are fairly boring, but that's not all of them by any means, or even most recent plugins. I don't think it's especially true that "traditional reverbs only modulate a single delay line", and it's easy to find documented evidence to the contrary (the Lexicon/Ensoniq algorithms that Jon Dattorro described, for example). Emulating a string ensemble chorus (with simultaneous slow and fast 3 phase LFOs) might be mildly interesting, depending on how it's applied to the reverb algorithm, but it's not like it's a groundbreaking innovation. It's basically trivial to come up with novel schemes for modulation, and I can't think of any reason why it would be worth bragging about it. To me it seems comparable to hi-fi amplifiers advertising a "complementary push-pull amplifier topology" when it's a standard design that's been used for decades. Just marketing gimmickry.
Old 3 days ago
  #82
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Lorenzop's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by acreil View Post
... To me it seems comparable to hi-fi amplifiers advertising a "complementary push-pull amplifier topology" when it's a standard design that's been used for decades. Just marketing gimmickry.
Ok, gotcha excellent analogy!!
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