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Circuit for low power Sample and Hold
Old 18th March 2019
  #1
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Circuit for low power Sample and Hold

Any schematics out there for a low voltage single supply rail
Sample and Hold that can be powered off 3.3V or 5V?

Everything I am finding on the interverse seems to be bipolar supply.

Thanks
Old 18th March 2019
  #2
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bitman's Avatar
You can use a Maxim chip to produce a -VCC rail which will permit use of those bipolar circuits you're seeing.
Old 4th February 2020
  #3
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Any adc need a sample and hold circuit ?if yes were to buy or make one?
Old 4th February 2020
  #4
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Whether or not you need a sample and hold before an ADC depends on the situation. Many ADCs do have a sample and hold built into the ADC itself. Some ADC topologies (such as the dual-slope converter) are intrinsically low-pass filtered by their circuit design and so may not need a sample and hold for many applications. Likewise, if your input is changing slowly with respect to your sample rate, you might not need one either.
Old 6th February 2020
  #5
Here I use the new Analog Devices ADA4625-1/2 fet opamps for sample and hold in devices like Lexicon reverbs. Those will run off a single 5 volt supply and have rail to rail outputs. They are also very quiet at 3.3 nv noise with a 50v us slew rate. They also sound great for analog usage. Yes, they are expensive.
Old 21st February 2020
  #6
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Let say i have a lynx audio e22 pci e do i need a sample and hold or a multiplexer and please what is the other signal conditioner needed befor this adc and wich company provides the calibratons and
Old 21st February 2020
  #7
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That card is more than just an A/D converter in itself; it would already have any required sample and hold, multiplexer, etc. circuits already on it. You just need to supply it an audio (or other) signal. I would assume that it comes pre-calibrated from the factory, or at least they would provide the necessary software and information to be able to do calibration, at least sufficient for audio work. I would not count on NIST-traceable calibration, if you need that, unless they specifically advertise that somewhere--and that could be important if you're using it to make certain absolute measurements, say in an industrial process control or product test environment, rather than for recording and playback of audio.

In short: you almost certainly need not worry about essential external circuits; it's all built in.
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