The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
What's the advantage to point to point wiring in a microphone?
Old 23rd May 2007
  #1
Gear Maniac
 

What's the advantage to point to point wiring in a microphone?

What is the advantage to having a microphone with point to point wiring over PCB?

Which mics have point to point wiring? I know the Pearlman TM1 and Brauner VM1 do - any others?
Old 23rd May 2007
  #2
Led
Lives for gear
 
Led's Avatar
Hi, I'm not a manufacturer, but from a user view, point to point is easier to repair and handles being worked on the best. I guess it's also the closest to the true desgin of the circuit. I have some great sounding gear that is pcb design. I've also seen some not so good stuff with copper traces so thin they come off if you sneeze. Point to point is more labour intensive so it's more costly in most cases, but I think most good manufacturers can make a great product nowdays on pcb's. I may be wrong, but point to point seems more of a luxury than a neccessity nowdays. Most of the greatly revered recording gear in history has some pcb element. Not all of them, but a majority.
Old 23rd May 2007
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Wavebourn's Avatar
 

Point to point on teflon inserts?
It may be high resistance wiring of a mic capsule.
Old 23rd May 2007
  #4
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Led View Post
Hi, I'm not a manufacturer, but from a user view, point to point is easier to repair and handles being worked on the best. I guess it's also the closest to the true desgin of the circuit. I have some great sounding gear that is pcb design. I've also seen some not so good stuff with copper traces so thin they come off if you sneeze. Point to point is more labour intensive so it's more costly in most cases, but I think most good manufacturers can make a great product nowdays on pcb's. I may be wrong, but point to point seems more of a luxury than a neccessity nowdays. Most of the greatly revered recording gear in history has some pcb element. Not all of them, but a majority.
Thanks for the explanation.
Old 25th May 2007
  #5
Lives for gear
 
NoEgo's Avatar
It can lead to an inferior circuit as boards may tend to dry out and become brittle over time. It stands to reason that point to point is better for longevity.
Also with PCB boards the more connections the more the signal loss. It compounds in stages.

The Pearlman is a great mic thought I would mention as an owner for a few years.
Lou
Old 25th May 2007
  #6
Led
Lives for gear
 
Led's Avatar
The longevity is a good point. I'm working on some 20 year old pcb's at the moment that are showing their age. Although I still think the quality of the pcb comes into consideration because I have some Neve comps and the boards in them (Ba191 etc)are more like nearly 40 years old and they still look like the day they were made. The traces are much bigger though.
Old 26th May 2007
  #7
Lives for gear
 
ulysses's Avatar
Three wild myths here: PCBs being harder to work on,PCBs not holding up over time, and PCBs causing some kind of signal loss.

The truth is that PCBs are a LOT easier to assemble, disassemble, repair, etc. IF you know what you're doing and have the right equipment. And the only decent-quality PCBs that degrade over time are the ones that get worked on, modified, repaired, de/resoldered by somebody who does NOT know what they're doing or have the right equipment. The main thing that destroys circuitboards is excessive heat - not the heat from circuits "running hot" but the heat from repeated desoldering and resoldering. When somebody takes a soldering iron and hacks away for 5 minutes trying to remove a resistor, they usually end up with the board delaminating and the traces peeling away. But if you have some skill and a good desoldering station that can completely desolder a component in a split second, you don't do that kind of damage.

As far as "signal loss" you should realize that regardless of which technology is used, the signal flows through the various components by way of copper wire, and tin/lead solder. It doesn't matter at all whether that copper wire is stuck to a piece of fiberglass or not.
Old 26th May 2007
  #8
Lives for gear
 
hangman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ulysses View Post
Three wild myths here: PCBs being harder to work on,PCBs not holding up over time, and PCBs causing some kind of signal loss.

The truth is that PCBs are a LOT easier to assemble, disassemble, repair, etc. IF you know what you're doing and have the right equipment. And the only decent-quality PCBs that degrade over time are the ones that get worked on, modified, repaired, de/resoldered by somebody who does NOT know what they're doing or have the right equipment. The main thing that destroys circuitboards is excessive heat - not the heat from circuits "running hot" but the heat from repeated desoldering and resoldering. When somebody takes a soldering iron and hacks away for 5 minutes trying to remove a resistor, they usually end up with the board delaminating and the traces peeling away. But if you have some skill and a good desoldering station that can completely desolder a component in a split second, you don't do that kind of damage.

As far as "signal loss" you should realize that regardless of which technology is used, the signal flows through the various components by way of copper wire, and tin/lead solder. It doesn't matter at all whether that copper wire is stuck to a piece of fiberglass or not.

I understand where you're coming from, but I wouldn't call them "myths" as much as I would call them "avoidable truths". I agree that circuit boards CAN be well made. CAN be easy to work on, and WILL hold up over time. though I would say that in a large percentage of music gear being made, that is not the case. especially guitar amplifiers... even some of the higher priced ones.
But you're right in saying that Manufacturers don't have to make crummy boards, they choose to.
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump