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microphone step up transformer Condenser Microphones
Old 2 days ago
  #1
Lives for gear
 

Thread Starter
microphone step up transformer

hey,
lately i enjoy recording at home instead of sitting in the dark studio. i bought myself an apogee one interface an neumann tlm102. pretty happy with the sound. sometimes id like a bit of a more colored sound and id like to get it right from the start. i would also not mind adding some noiseless gain to the preamp.

can i use a step up transformer between the mic and my interface? or will it screw up my impedances? the mic has a 50 Ohm output and the interfaces preamp offer 2-3k. im thinking of using something like an old v72 input trafo to add vibe and gain. but im really not sure about impedance. thanks!
Old 2 days ago
  #2
Gear Maniac
 

Since you want to mess up the sound anyway, I wouldn't worry about impedances. The bigger problem will be how are you going to phantom power the mic once you put a transformer in the path?

Geoff
Old 3 hours ago
  #3
Lives for gear
 

Thread Starter
hey,
thanks for your reply. stupid me did not think of that. but it seems that there are some transformers that can pass phantom power via their ceinter tap. would this work: SOWTER TYPE 9045 TRANSFORMER
i assume that since the mic has very low output impedance (50 Ohms) i can bump it up to 200 Ohms without a problem? if so what ratio of a transformer would i need?

sorry im a transformer noob
Old 1 hour ago
  #4
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by salomonander View Post
hey,

sorry im a transformer noob
OK, a couple things to keep in mind.

The impedance ratio is the square of the turns ratio. So if you want to go from 50 ohms to 200 (1:4), you want a turns ratio of 1:2. You could do that with just a simple 1:1 transformer with split windings (put the primary windings in parallel).

Generally we try to avoid having DC current flow through the transformer, although it might do some "interesting" things to the sound. You would have to be the judge. The Sowter mentions feeding phantom voltage to the primary centre-tap. If you connected the primary centre-tap to the secondary CT, and the input was feeding phantom, that should power a microphone, although I've never tried it. The Sowter is also roughly 1:10, which will give you a lot of gain and maybe put some stress on the mic (once again, you would have to decide whether that is a bad thing or not).

Generally, phantom is fed to the hot and cold lines (pins 2 and 3 of the input XLR)with a pair of matched resistors, which powers the microphone without causing any current to flow in the transformer (if there even is one).

Geoff
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