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Anyone know a college that awards legit MUSIC TECH degrees based on prior knowledge? Virtual Instrument Plugins
Old 31st August 2011
  #1
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Anyone know a college that awards legit MUSIC TECH degrees based on prior knowledge?

I know many of you will think this is silly, but I'm trying to find out possible ways of obtaining an accredited bachelor's degree based on prior knowledge... without actually attending three years of college.


My situation:

* I've recently done a CELTA course, giving me a well recognised qualification to teach English as a foreign language.
I obtained a 'pass B' grade, which supposedly puts me in the top 22% of the people who take the course. Apparently, colleges are fairly selective about who they allow onto this course in the first place.
My point in mentioning this is that I feel very confident to teach English as a foreign language.
However, visa requirements for teachers going to the places I would like to teach (ie Japan/Middle East) insist that candidates have a bachelor's degree.
Furthermore, most of the decent jobs teaching English here in the UK also insist on a degree.

* I have a pretty decent knowledge of Music Technology; I have over ten years experience of working in this field, I have worked in studios, done numerous courses on various aspects, read lots on the subject, and have a portfolio of work I have written & produced (including an original soundtrack to an 11 episode series on The Discovery Channel and a fair few of my own artist records released under several different labels).
Utilising this knowledge, combined with the teaching skills I have obtained from the CELTA course, I feel I would also quite like to teach Music Technology. The catch; virtually every job in this field asks for a bachelor's degree.

Essentially, I need a bachelors degree... but not for the knowledge I would glean from it; solely as a piece of paper to satisfy visa requirements/job specifications.



Now, this might sound a bit arrogant, but I'm fairly confident that I already know virtually everything that I would learn from a bachelor's degree in Music Technology. As stated above- I'd actually quite like to actually lecture on the topic!
So, I'm now looking into whether there is a way for me to get hold of a bachelor's degree in Music Tech, but without actually attending the course.

I can't afford either the time, or the extortive costs of enrolling in a conventional three-year university course, but even if I could, I feel it would just be a waste of time, since I would already know everything I need to know from what would be covered on an undergraduate course.



I've been doing some research, and I have read that there are a few colleges in the USA that can award legitimate, accredited bachelors degrees, based purely on what a candidate already knows. There are several different methods of doing this, but it mainly boils down to either sitting exams or creating portfolios to demonstrate the candidate's knowledge of the topic.
Cutting Online University Cost - Life Experience Degree | GetEducated.com
Can I Earn a Degree Based on Life Experience? - Christian Online Learning: Bible, College, Seminary Degrees
About the College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
Excelsior College - excelsior.edu
Thomas Edison State College
Charter Oak State College - Finish Your Degree Online
DSST - GetCollegeCredit.com
My problems with this are:
a.) None of the exams are remotely relevant to the topic I wish to ideally get my bachelor's degree in.
b.) These colleges are in the USA, and it would seemingly require me to travel to the USA to sit these exams.




So, my questions for you guys are:

1.) Does anyone know of anything similar to these aforementioned systems, only that include Music Technology as the subject?

2.) Does anyone know of anything similar to these (Allowing me to get a LEGITIMATE, ACCREDITED bachelor's degree, but based on knowledge I already have), but perhaps in other countries (Ideally the UK)?

3.) If not a bachelor's degree, how about something that can be converted to a bachelor's degree with a short course of further study- eg, if I could use prior knowledge to obtain something like a HND, that can then be 'topped up' to a degree with just one year of study (Thus saving me two years!)?


I know that some people will scoff at the idea of this type of degree, and it will probably not land me a six-figure salary on Wall Street... but again, all I really need is the certificate to satisfy visa requirements... so as long as it's accredited by a genuine, recognised body, that is all I care about!


Thanks.
Old 31st August 2011
  #2
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The money is the key unfortunately. They want you to attend because they want to charge you 3 years of tuition.

Now, if you could somehow slip into a deans office and write a check for 3 years of tuition, it might be very possible to suddenly test out.

Otherwise, here in America anyhow, you're either going to have to go the route of what you've already listed, essentially paying to take a test, or you're going to have to attend unless you plan to get into law and which point you can pay to take the Bar exam at any point you so choose irregardless of schooling.

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Old 31st August 2011
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
Essentially, I need a bachelors degree... but not for the knowledge I would glean from it; solely as a piece of paper to satisfy visa requirements/job specifications.
Kafkaism...




























...but good luck, Simon. Hopefully you'll get to where you wanna get to without too much red-tape stressing.
Old 31st August 2011
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhollmusik View Post
Kafkaism...

...but good luck, Simon. Hopefully you'll get to where you wanna get to without too much red-tape stressing.
It's a tough Metamorphosis. :-o
Old 31st August 2011
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sftd View Post
you're either going to have to go the route of what you've already listed, essentially paying to take a test,p
I'm absolutely happy to pay to take the tests... The issues are:

1.) The tests I've found so far are about things like History of the North American Civil War, or Nursing... I can't find any tests about Digital Audio Recording, or Musical Instrument Digital Interface!

2.) The tests are held in New Jersey. It's not totally infeasible for me to travel there for this... but it is not exactly convenient... especially when the tests they have are totally irrelevant- as mentioned in point 1.
Old 31st August 2011
  #6
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I don't know of any undergraduate program that limits its classes solely to one specific discipline. Any degree is going to have a distribution of different disciplines as part of their program. It's likely that you could test out of certain technical classes in an audio engineering program if your skills and knowledge are what you say they are, but that won't get you out of having to take math, English comp, history, or whatever else the college has put together in their degree curriculum.

-Ben B
Old 31st August 2011
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
I'm absolutely happy to pay to take the tests... The issues are:

1.) The tests I've found so far are about things like History of the North American Civil War, or Nursing... I can't find any tests about Digital Audio Recording, or Musical Instrument Digital Interface!

2.) The tests are held in New Jersey. It's not totally infeasible for me to travel there for this... but it is not exactly convenient... especially when the tests they have are totally irrelevant- as mentioned in point 1.
I fear you might not end up finding any that award an actual Batchelors in any form of music that allow an immediate test-out.

Which I believe is ridiculous might I add, it seems a field of study that would be very appropriate for a test-out.

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Old 31st August 2011
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben B View Post
I don't know of any undergraduate program that limits its classes solely to one specific discipline. Any degree is going to have a distribution of different disciplines as part of their program. It's likely that you could test out of certain technical classes in an audio engineering program if your skills and knowledge are what you say they are, but that won't get you out of having to take math, English comp, history, or whatever else the college has put together in their degree curriculum.

-Ben B
Really? It sounds like things are quite different over there in the USA;

I actually did a year of a degree in my teens before stupidly flunking out when I was offered a spot on an accelerated management development course.
I was enrolled on BSc Psychology, and all the classes were about different aspects of Psychology.
Old 31st August 2011
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sftd View Post
it seems a field of study that would be very appropriate for a test-out.


I agree. Probably far more so than Nursing!
Old 31st August 2011
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
2.) Does anyone know of anything similar to these (Allowing me to get a LEGITIMATE, ACCREDITED bachelor's degree, but based on knowledge I already have), but perhaps in other countries (Ideally the UK)?

3.) If not a bachelor's degree, how about something that can be converted to a bachelor's degree with a short course of further study- eg, if I could use prior knowledge to obtain something like a HND, that can then be 'topped up' to a degree with just one year of study (Thus saving me two years!)?
[/B]
Just to clarify... this doesn't specifically need to be a dedicated Music Technology degree... ANY accredited bachelor's degree will serve the purpose I need (ie, having a bit of paper to wave at Saudi Arabian customs officials!).

... If anyone knows of anything like this in any topics, anywhere in the world, then I'm keen to hear about the options.
Old 31st August 2011
  #11
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Piggybacking on what Ben B said about US schools, not only do they require you to take general education (math, science, history, writing, etc) but they require you to establish a number of residency credits. If you were to test out of a number of classes, you will still have to attend a number of classes to meet residency requirements. Additionally, very few of the classes you take are actually geared towards your major...I think about 1/3 or so while getting your Associate's Degree. Because of this, many people expect that they can "test out to get a degree" and end up falling short on general knowledge. Also, many schools will limit the number of classes you can test out of (whether it's testing it out through the school, or through another program such as CLEP). I know this is all related to US schools, but there might be some similarities with UK schools, for you to consider.
Old 31st August 2011
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roboticefx View Post
Piggybacking on what Ben B said about US schools, not only do they require you to take general education (math, science, history, writing, etc) but they require you to establish a number of residency credits. If you were to test out of a number of classes, you will still have to attend a number of classes to meet residency requirements. Additionally, very few of the classes you take are actually geared towards your major...I think about 1/3 or so while getting your Associate's Degree. Because of this, many people expect that they can "test out to get a degree" and end up falling short on general knowledge. Also, many schools will limit the number of classes you can test out of (whether it's testing it out through the school, or through another program such as CLEP). I know this is all related to US schools, but there might be some similarities with UK schools, for you to consider.

Thanks for your input.

According to this site-

'Two regionally accredited distance-learning colleges in the United States—Thomas Edison State College of New Jersey and Excelsior College of New York—operate primarily as assessment colleges. These two special colleges allow students to earn entire undergraduate degrees through credit for life and work experience options.'

... So it seems that at least two colleges in the US will allow accredited degrees entirely through 'test-out'/portfolio.
So far, I can't find anywhere else in the world that does the same.


To be honest, the issue of other subjects does not phase me in the slightest; I'm strong on general knowledge and I actually teach English.
I haven't done academic mathematics for a while, but I sat the higher paper & got a B grade at GCSE... I'm sure with a brief amount of prep I could get through what was necessary.
Old 31st August 2011
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
Essentially, I need a bachelors degree... but not for the knowledge I would glean from it; solely as a piece of paper to satisfy visa requirements/job specifications.

This is pretty much the entire purpose of a bachelors. Its a social qualifier much more than a real-world job-preparer. Its society's standardized way of testing a person's ability to set and achieve long term goals.

There won't be a quick test fix, this isn't worth your time really. That's not the purpose of a bachelors. These test out schools in New Jersey but nowhere else in the world probably won't hold water.

From a recent article in the New Yorker:

"Society needs a mechanism for sorting out its more intelligent members from its less intelligent ones, just as a track team needs a mechanism (such as a stopwatch) for sorting out the faster athletes from the slower ones. Society wants to identify intelligent people early on so that it can funnel them into careers that maximize their talents. It wants to get the most out of its human resources. College is a process that is sufficiently multifaceted and fine-grained to do this."

http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critic...#ixzz1SfhtpeId
Old 31st August 2011
  #14
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... There is obviously The Open University in the UK... but from what I can gather, it seems to cost every bit as much (possibly even more!) as enrolling on a regular university degree course.

Not only that, but it also looks like you need to do it over a period of years, and write numerous assignments/essays at a patronisingly basic level.
Old 31st August 2011
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
This is pretty much the entire purpose of a bachelors. Its a social qualifier much more than a real-world job-preparer. Its society's standardized way of testing a person's ability to set and achieve long term goals.

There won't be a quick test fix, this isn't worth your time really. That's not the purpose of a bachelors. These test out schools in New Jersey but nowhere else in the world probably won't hold water.

From a recent article in the New Yorker:

"Society needs a mechanism for sorting out its more intelligent members from its less intelligent ones, just as a track team needs a mechanism (such as a stopwatch) for sorting out the faster athletes from the slower ones. Society wants to identify intelligent people early on so that it can funnel them into careers that maximize their talents. It wants to get the most out of its human resources. College is a process that is sufficiently multifaceted and fine-grained to do this."

Debating the Value of College in America : The New Yorker

Yeah, I understand all that... but what am I supposed to do now?

... If I enroll on a regular 3 year Music Technology course, it's going to be 3 years of-

Lecturer: 'So, this is what Nyquist theory says........'

Simon:

Lecturer: 'So, this is a MIDI cable'

Simon:

Lecturer: 'So, you owe us £20,000'

Simon:





Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
These test out schools in New Jersey but nowhere else in the world probably won't hold water.
As far as I can tell, these are legitimately accredited by a recognised body.

An American degree is AFAIK considered to be equivalent to a European degree... so, it seems of these would be perfectly fine for the purposes of ticking boxes on visa applications.


... So, these are fine, I'm just wondering if anyone knows of any other options besides these.
Old 31st August 2011
  #16
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Simonator,

I don't think you're really going to have to waste all that money on one of these rip off courses as not only will you know nearly everything they'll try to teach you ( having seen your intelligent responses to many threads here ) but you'll also find that a lot of places won't require that qualification to get you a position of teaching.

A friend of min has just left one of the Army bands and just walked into a tech position at a private secondary school in London ... no special degree but a lot of understanding.

I've guest lectured at quite a few of the London schools ( never had a tech education myself ) and I can guarantee that a lot of the older professor types in these places haven't got these degrees themselves ( because they weren't around when they were studying )

I really believe that these courses are a total waste of time and money but they are very profitable if you're on the other end.

Get your CV looking good and have a punt around and see what sticks I bet you'll be surprised

All the best !

Beer.
Old 31st August 2011
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
Yeah, I understand all that... but what am I supposed to do now?

... If I enroll on a regular 3 year Music Technology course, it's going to be 3 years of-

Lecturer: 'So, this is what Nyquist theory says........'

Simon:

Lecturer: 'So, this is a MIDI cable'

Simon:

Lecturer: 'So, you owe us £20,000'

Simon:

If you want to qualify to teach at accredited schools yeah. Sorry man.

The system is a bit flawed for modern times, technology and school don't always go together. The New Yorker has also recently written articles about how the apprenticeship/master system needs to come back into play in a major way now that technologies are so specialized.

You can always set up your own school or classes. Or places like SAE will hire teachers based entirely on portfolio.

Teaching English overseas though you'll need your bachelors.
Old 31st August 2011
  #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beermaster View Post
Simonator,

I don't think you're really going to have to waste all that money on one of these rip off courses as not only will you know nearly everything they'll try to teach you ( having seen your intelligent responses to many threads here ) but you'll also find that a lot of places won't require that qualification to get you a position of teaching.

A friend of min has just left one of the Army bands and just walked into a tech position at a private secondary school in London ... no special degree but a lot of understanding.

I've guest lectured at quite a few of the London schools ( never had a tech education myself ) and I can guarantee that a lot of the older professor types in these places haven't got these degrees themselves ( because they weren't around when they were studying )

I really believe that these courses are a total waste of time and money but they are very profitable if you're on the other end.

Get your CV looking good and have a punt around and see what sticks I bet you'll be surprised

All the best !

Beer.

Cheers Beer!

Yeah, I keep thinking about approaching some of the private colleges doing music here in London.

The thing is, the wage I'll get for teaching here in the UK is pretty low;
TEFL wise, lots of CELTA qualified teachers who have been abroad previously & returned > saturated job market.
Music Tech wise > Not so many jobs to start with.

Essentially, I can probably only earn ~£300/£400 per week teaching anyway, whereas I can double/triple that working in sales.

... My issue is more with needing the qualification for foreign visas.
Old 31st August 2011
  #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newguy1 View Post
If you want to qualify to teach at accredited schools yeah. Sorry man.
No real interest in working in accredited schools.

My wife is Japanese, so I can easily get a spouse visa for Japan.
Still, most language schools there expect every teacher to have a bachelor's degree. Most people I know in the same situation simply lie, and it's never checked.

Still, since I know that the possibility exists to get an accredited degree from 'test-out' only in New Jersey... I'm just asking if anyone knows of any other options.
Old 31st August 2011
  #20
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Roboticefx's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
Thanks for your input.

According to this site-

'Two regionally accredited distance-learning colleges in the United States—Thomas Edison State College of New Jersey and Excelsior College of New York—operate primarily as assessment colleges. These two special colleges allow students to earn entire undergraduate degrees through credit for life and work experience options.'

... So it seems that at least two colleges in the US will allow accredited degrees entirely through 'test-out'/portfolio.
So far, I can't find anywhere else in the world that does the same.


To be honest, the issue of other subjects does not phase me in the slightest; I'm strong on general knowledge and I actually teach English.
I haven't done academic mathematics for a while, but I sat the higher paper & got a B grade at GCSE... I'm sure with a brief amount of prep I could get through what was necessary.
I'm familiar with both of those schools, as I know more than one individual attending or graduated from both. One guy I know attended Thomas Edison and just had to take a humanities class to graduate. They were in the same boat, they just wanted a quick degree and didn't care what weight it held.

With these schools you still don't just pop in and get a degree, though. They use assessments based on actual training or experience you've attained. For example, if you've done an apprenticeship where your journeyman progress is noted, if you have your MCSE/A+/NET+/CCNA certs, etc. If you go in there with just job experience, it's harder than if you have documentation of prior training you've had. Dig up anything you can find from your past...any training or anything that has hours recorded on it. But...yes both are very easy to get degrees.
Old 1st September 2011
  #21
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So, I just found out that SAE offer a TWO-year BA/BSc (Hons) Audio Production... which is actually only a one-year course... after successful completion of a one-year diploma.

... I wonder if they'd ever allow people to just jump into the final year if they can demonstrate they have the required knowledge & portfolio already?

I might have to go & have a chat with them.


I understand they are pretty expensive though... does anyone know the costs of their courses?
Old 1st September 2011
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
I understand they are pretty expensive though... does anyone know the costs of their courses?
OUCH... I just found this: http://oxford.sae.edu/media/Oxford/p...e_Schedule.pdf

... Which is two years old, and pertaining to their Oxford college... so no doubt current London prices are way higher...

Looks like it was THEN £36,200!!! WOW.
Old 1st September 2011
  #23
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I did a studio recording program which was actually really good in Canada but I have to say it's always better to just buy some gear with the $$$$ or go into real studios and record and get to know people.

re: transferring credits etc it seems to me like it would be difficult to do in a music field where so much is subjective grading and pass/fail type education....I dunno about online university colleges either, I went to a well know University and was placed there with teachers I knew from Conservatory etc

then again I did a performance degree not a recording arts degree so maybe they are more lenient in the recording arts field about your past experience

lols it sounds kind of funny tho , youre trying to get a recording arts BA so you can go teach english....hehe arent there places you dont have to have a degree to teach in?

tons of my friends made some good cash teaching english and even french in asia
Old 1st September 2011
  #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zombie H View Post
lols it sounds kind of funny tho , youre trying to get a recording arts BA so you can go teach english....hehe arent there places you dont have to have a degree to teach in?
Tell me about it

The thing is, my Mrs is Japanese... so we plan to settle in Japan.

I can make decent money in the UK from sales... but I obviously can't do the requisite verbal gymnastics in a country where I can barely speak the language... so it's going to be English teaching.

Now, to get a visa to teach, you need a degree. This doesn't apply to me, because I can get a spouse visa.
But... ALL the schools ask for a degree, this is because:
1.) Since the visa needs it, they simply insist/expect all teachers have one.
2.) EVERYONE in Japan has a degree... it's almost like compulsory education. To not have a degree in the UK is not extremely rare, whereas in Japan, they will view you as a lowly piece of ****.

Now, I have a friend in Tokyo who is also married to a Japanese girl. Exactly the same situation. He is getting away with simply lying, and many places just assume you must have one to have even got a visa in the first place.
Still, I thought it would be worth looking into this to see if there is any option such as these colleges in New Jersey.


Also, I'm semi-keen on going to the Middle-East before settling long-term in Japan... You can make some SERIOUS cash in Saudi Arabia, TAX FREE, and have all living expenses covered... basically, banking ~£25-30 k PA.
... Just a year of that could give me a nest-egg to start a farm in Japan... thus negating the need to teach there at all!
Old 1st September 2011
  #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
Tell me about it

The thing is, my Mrs is Japanese... so we plan to settle in Japan.

I can make decent money in the UK from sales... but I obviously can't do the requisite verbal gymnastics in a country where I can barely speak the language... so it's going to be English teaching.

Now, to get a visa to teach, you need a degree. This doesn't apply to me, because I can get a spouse visa.
But... ALL the schools ask for a degree, this is because:
1.) Since the visa needs it, they simply insist/expect all teachers have one.
2.) EVERYONE in Japan has a degree... it's almost like compulsory education. To not have a degree in the UK is not extremely rare, whereas in Japan, they will view you as a lowly piece of ****.

thats very true regarding not having a degree in Japan - maybe you could look at starting your own language business tho and find your own clientele

you'll always be white devil (gaijin) anyways......

japanese chicks are hot (imho)
Old 1st September 2011
  #26
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atma's Avatar
i think you should start a school that does this so all of us can get an easy B.A.!
Old 1st September 2011
  #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
I know many of you will think this is silly, but I'm trying to find out possible ways of obtaining an accredited bachelor's degree based on prior knowledge... without actually attending three years of college.


My situation:

* I've recently done a CELTA course, giving me a well recognised qualification to teach English as a foreign language.
I obtained a 'pass B' grade, which supposedly puts me in the top 22% of the people who take the course. Apparently, colleges are fairly selective about who they allow onto this course in the first place.
My point in mentioning this is that I feel very confident to teach English as a foreign language.
However, visa requirements for teachers going to the places I would like to teach (ie Japan/Middle East) insist that candidates have a bachelor's degree.
Furthermore, most of the decent jobs teaching English here in the UK also insist on a degree.

* I have a pretty decent knowledge of Music Technology; I have over ten years experience of working in this field, I have worked in studios, done numerous courses on various aspects, read lots on the subject, and have a portfolio of work I have written & produced (including an original soundtrack to an 11 episode series on The Discovery Channel and a fair few of my own artist records released under several different labels).
Utilising this knowledge, combined with the teaching skills I have obtained from the CELTA course, I feel I would also quite like to teach Music Technology. The catch; virtually every job in this field asks for a bachelor's degree.

Essentially, I need a bachelors degree... but not for the knowledge I would glean from it; solely as a piece of paper to satisfy visa requirements/job specifications.



Now, this might sound a bit arrogant, but I'm fairly confident that I already know virtually everything that I would learn from a bachelor's degree in Music Technology. As stated above- I'd actually quite like to actually lecture on the topic!
So, I'm now looking into whether there is a way for me to get hold of a bachelor's degree in Music Tech, but without actually attending the course.

I can't afford either the time, or the extortive costs of enrolling in a conventional three-year university course, but even if I could, I feel it would just be a waste of time, since I would already know everything I need to know from what would be covered on an undergraduate course.



I've been doing some research, and I have read that there are a few colleges in the USA that can award legitimate, accredited bachelors degrees, based purely on what a candidate already knows. There are several different methods of doing this, but it mainly boils down to either sitting exams or creating portfolios to demonstrate the candidate's knowledge of the topic.
Cutting Online University Cost - Life Experience Degree | GetEducated.com
Can I Earn a Degree Based on Life Experience? - Christian Online Learning: Bible, College, Seminary Degrees
About the College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
Excelsior College - excelsior.edu
Thomas Edison State College
Charter Oak State College - Finish Your Degree Online
DSST - GetCollegeCredit.com
My problems with this are:
a.) None of the exams are remotely relevant to the topic I wish to ideally get my bachelor's degree in.
b.) These colleges are in the USA, and it would seemingly require me to travel to the USA to sit these exams.




So, my questions for you guys are:

1.) Does anyone know of anything similar to these aforementioned systems, only that include Music Technology as the subject?

2.) Does anyone know of anything similar to these (Allowing me to get a LEGITIMATE, ACCREDITED bachelor's degree, but based on knowledge I already have), but perhaps in other countries (Ideally the UK)?

3.) If not a bachelor's degree, how about something that can be converted to a bachelor's degree with a short course of further study- eg, if I could use prior knowledge to obtain something like a HND, that can then be 'topped up' to a degree with just one year of study (Thus saving me two years!)?


I know that some people will scoff at the idea of this type of degree, and it will probably not land me a six-figure salary on Wall Street... but again, all I really need is the certificate to satisfy visa requirements... so as long as it's accredited by a genuine, recognised body, that is all I care about!


Thanks.
no legitmate school will do that
been there: researched that thoroughly (5 cases of pritnouts and a shelf of books going over the topic in detail)
NO LEGITIMATE ACCREDITED SCHOOL WILL DO THAT

they all want your tuition money
and want to "uphold their own personal standards"
and make more tuition money
while avoiding looking like a diploma mill

some legitimate schools will give you a little credit for other courses and a few even some for provable experience.

you can buy plenty of fake degrees that way
many with fake accreditation too
and some with a registrar etc to verify attendance etc

if your potential job's company doesnt check then that would work for you

in spite of what some claim
nobody ever gets the degree without taking some classes at their campus

and you do have to test out or otherwise get credit for ALL the crap liberal arts courses. no legitimate school gives out degrees for just technical classes/knowledge.
Old 1st September 2011
  #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
So, I just found out that SAE offer a TWO-year BA/BSc (Hons) Audio Production... which is actually only a one-year course... after successful completion of a one-year diploma.

... I wonder if they'd ever allow people to just jump into the final year if they can demonstrate they have the required knowledge & portfolio already?

I might have to go & have a chat with them.


I understand they are pretty expensive though... does anyone know the costs of their courses?
what accreditation does SAE have ?
(SAE = Society of Automotive Engineers in the colonies !)

you can learn more faster better cheaper AND accredited at a community college
Old 1st September 2011
  #29
Lives for gear
 

Schools don't just give away degrees without having at least 2 years to mold you into their particular mode of thought regarding your particular field. If they did, lots of individuals could potentially pass these tests but then go out into the real world, prove themselves incompetent, and reflect poorly on the institution. Einstein didn't just walk into Cambridge, say "I invented the theory of relativity please give me a degree."
Old 1st September 2011
  #30
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
Really? It sounds like things are quite different over there in the USA;

I actually did a year of a degree in my teens before stupidly flunking out when I was offered a spot on an accelerated management development course.
I was enrolled on BSc Psychology, and all the classes were about different aspects of Psychology.
that is rare- very rare.
my son won a governors scholarship to UVA which let him pick the 120 credits he wanted to take. Everybody else has to take the mandatory requirements.
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