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Anyone know a college that awards legit MUSIC TECH degrees based on prior knowledge? Virtual Instrument Plugins
Old 2nd September 2011
  #61
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The MPCist's Avatar
 

I think the main focus of education is that you have to spend that time to earn it.

Hell, I didn't learned much of anything that I already didn't know by the time I finished my two Master degrees.... Schools don't care about that; it's about paying your dues... literally.

The way I look at it, a degree is only useful if you are going to work for someone. If your dreams are bigger and plan on being your own boss, well.... you might, nor might not, need it.

But as far as the OP's situation, I would suggest getting one for work in Japan.
Old 2nd September 2011
  #62
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Simonator's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldeanalogueguy View Post
they are the crappy useless classes that you have zero interest in, have no value, waste your time, costs you tuition money, and have nothing to do with what you want to do or learn.

example
history, english, psychology, sociology, philosophy, physical education ("gym"), latin, chemistry, foreign languages, and so on, when you want electronics engineering, math, physics, acoustics, music, etc.
Wow... they make you do GYM classes on a degree in the USA??

Here in the UK, it's normally ALL directly related to the subject you are studying.
Old 2nd September 2011
  #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JES View Post
No serious or prestigious program is going to give you a BA degree for being you.
Obviously

Quote:
Originally Posted by JES View Post
If you think learning in a range of fields is bull****, then a BA isn't for you.
Wait... who said that?

Wherever you learnt reading comprehension, I suggest you ask them for a refund.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JES View Post
Just don't insult people with real educations who put in the time.
Look, sorry I've made you cry.

The thing is, I have been studying this field for a decade. Just not whilst enrolled on a £40,000 course.

All I'm asking is is anyone knows of anywhere I can do test-out in my specialist fields... in the same way IT IS POSSIBLE TO DO at those American colleges previously discussed.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JES View Post
If you want to teach, wouldn't it make sense to spend some time in the presence of teachers and in classrooms? Sorta like listening to music if you want to make it. I've seen very smart and famous people fail spectacularly in a room of students. Repeatedly.
I've just undertaken the most widely revered teaching course in my field, and got an above standard grade (a far better grade than the experienced teachers on my course). This course involved a lot of practical experience of teaching classes.




I just knew there would be a bunch of whiney bitches coming out of the woodwork on this thread.

Thanks for the people who have offered some useful suggestions though.
Old 2nd September 2011
  #64
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I posted this same thread to another area of the forum, and someone there posted this:


Quote:
Originally Posted by kbshearer View Post
I recently did this. I had some college credits but had not finished a degree. I enrolled in the distance learning program at Charter Oak State College, and put together an Audio Engineering and Commercial Music Production Degree. You can propose your area of concentration, and then use what they call portfolios to make a case for your knowledge. Now...it's not a quick, painless way. You have to really do a specific portfolio package that proves you know what you claim you do. In fact, you take an 8 week class to learn how to put the portfolio together. Then, I finished whatever general ed I had left via DSST and CLEP tests. In the end, I got a fully accredited Bachelor's degree from a real university using some of my 25 plus years in audio production as some of the credits.


Kirt Shearer
Paradise Studios

... Exactly the type of info I was looking for. So... it IS possible.
Old 2nd September 2011
  #65
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pukozade's Avatar
 

HAHAHA music degree u lol
Old 2nd September 2011
  #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
Wow... they make you do GYM classes on a degree in the USA??

Here in the UK, it's normally ALL directly related to the subject you are studying.
yes
undergraduate makes you take gym for two years
many schools require two years of ROTC (play soldier) too

usa doesnt give a ratspatoot about practical
they want to make you well rounded
and keep funding all the useless departments in the uni

if michelle has her way they will make you eat broccoli at lunch to get your degree too
Old 2nd September 2011
  #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The MPCist View Post
I think the main focus of education is that you have to spend that time to earn it.

Hell, I didn't learned much of anything that I already didn't know by the time I finished my two Master degrees.... Schools don't care about that; it's about paying your dues... literally.

The way I look at it, a degree is only useful if you are going to work for someone. If your dreams are bigger and plan on being your own boss, well.... you might, nor might not, need it.

But as far as the OP's situation, I would suggest getting one for work in Japan.
wow
everythign i had in grad school was new
or at least more advanced versions of previous with new stuff

indeed a degree is only to get through the HR/visa filter
if you work for yourself like say billy gates you dont need no stinkin degree.
Old 2nd September 2011
  #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pukozade View Post
HAHAHA music degree u lol
many usa unis have music degrees

but you still have to take 2-3 years of useless crap courses for a degree
Old 2nd September 2011
  #69
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Simonator's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldeanalogueguy View Post
if michelle has her way they will make you eat broccoli at lunch to get your degree too
Gotta be better than the turkey Twizzlers.

Tony Blair sent our best man Jamie Oliver over there to help you guys lose some weight... but you just bullied him until he cried :_(
Old 2nd September 2011
  #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
I posted this same thread to another area of the forum, and someone there posted this:





... Exactly the type of info I was looking for. So... it IS possible.
only in theory

in practice you will take courses - probably at least 10-12 as a bare minimum

let us know what happened after you contact them and explore the zero coursework option. just the portfolios could take you 2+ years to do successfully. and you still need the history , math, literature, social science, psychology, yada yada etc.

no degree without meeting the mandatory "distribution" requirements even if you can test out of every one of them or submit a portfolio for them.
Old 3rd September 2011
  #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldeanalogueguy View Post
yes
undergraduate makes you take gym for two years
many schools require two years of ROTC (play soldier) too

usa doesnt give a ratspatoot about practical
they want to make you well rounded
and keep funding all the useless departments in the uni

if michelle has her way they will make you eat broccoli at lunch to get your degree too
LOL! Too effing true. I remember having an archery and bowling class. It was a total joke.

Many years after I graduated, the main uni put in a state of the art recording studio!

Back then I was saving nickels and dimes, while also working full time, to buy studio time.

Universities in the USA are big business.

Sports entertainment and MEGA tens or hundreds of billions on "research."

I had a friend who did some high end stuff at a very famous uni known for medical research. The money wasted versus ANY research gained was a joke. 100% of everything was working on getting more grant money and cocktail parties to hob nob.
Old 3rd September 2011
  #72
JES
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Dear Simonator,

I obviously touched a nerve or hurt your feelings or something since you're now calling me names ("whiny bitches" -- really?). So please accept my apology, I did dash off my post quickly and was responding to several things at once. Since you appeared unclear on what I was saying, I will explain myself.

When I said: "If you think learning in a range of fields is bull****, then a BA isn't for you."

I was responding to oldanaloguy who had said "they are the crappy useless classes that you have zero interest in, have no value, waste your time, costs you tuition money, and have nothing to do with what you want to do or learn.

example
history, english, psychology, sociology, philosophy, physical education ("gym"), latin, chemistry, foreign languages, and so on, when you want electronics engineering, math, physics, acoustics, music, etc."

Which is right above my post, and which you quote right in the post immediately before the one before you say to me "who said that?" Now, we can debate what "range" means but what I mean is that most well educated, interesting and smart people I know may excel in some amazing way at one thing--music, cooking, writing, fixing cars, whatever. But they always have some unrelated interests, and sometimes those interests even creep into their work in kind of amazing ways. You can't know that ahead of time everything that is relevant to what you think you want to do, and that's the value of a well-rounded degree. For example, if you want to do audio, I can think of dozens of ways knowledge of chemistry might be really relevant, depending on what you want to do. Same with psych or sociology. I'm not saying it would be automatically relevant for everyone, but part of education is checking out a lot of stuff.

My original point wasn't that everyone should get a BA. It was that nobody who isn't interested in going outside their immediate comfort zone should get a BA. (And BTW many many major universities and colleges do not have a gym requirement.)

Now if you just need a degree to teach in Japan, then go ahead and order one and pay your money and you'll have it. And it is certainly true that you don't need a degree to work for yourself -- or to make good music (though I think oldanaloguy and I are going to disagree on everything in this thread: Bill Gates is a bad example for that argument: he went to Harvard).

All I'm saying is that it's not the same, and just because you're good at music doesn't automatically mean you're good at everything you'd encounter in the course of a good degree program. Will you need it? Who knows. I never needed the squaredancing classes we had to take in elementary school but quantitative methods turned out to be pretty handy even if it's not directly relevant to what I do on a daily basis. I'm glad you excelled in a course, but a good mark in a single course means you've got lots of potential. With both teaching and music (and probably anything else) it takes a long time to get good.

All that said, there's lots of crap programs out there with bad teachers, silly requirements and where there is an explicit money grab, so I'm not saying all educational institutions are good or beyond reproach. Just that education can and should be something more, a lot more, than credentialing.

This is gearslutz, not educationslutz (I can imagine it, though -- "can anyone actually tell the difference between my University of Phoenix BS in business and this other guy's Harvard MBA in a blind test?"), but it seemed like a point worth making.

Anyway, once again I am sorry I upset you. I judged you to have a thick skin from some other threads, I wrote the post quickly and I didn't mean to flame.

Good luck with your move and I hope you are able to do what you want to do.
Old 3rd September 2011
  #73
Gear Head
 

I actually live and work in Japan, so I can fill you in on some ways that my friends have handled this.

If the idea is simply to live abroad and get involved in the scene, why don't you consider going to school in Japan? There are a number of International Schools that basically beg people from other countries to attend (they'll typically drop the normal tuition costs) just so they can claim that they have students from all over the world attending. There are programs that you can do in English and with a student visa you would be able to work as much as you wanted at an English school. Friends of mine worked part-time at two or three different schools (there is usually a B.A. requirement to work "full-time". Also, you can make a lot of money doing private and corporate lessons once you've made some connections... knowing people is really important here, so just make friends with everyone that you can).

I'm not sure about a program that caters specifically to your desired degree, but if you looked around you might find something and you won't go broke doing it. you'll also have plenty of time to play/see gigs.

my 2 cents. maybe you'll find it helpful.
Old 3rd September 2011
  #74
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WhiteSheets's Avatar
A possibility might actually be to do a Masters degree - which would only take a year. Its unusual, but certain Masters degrees will take you if you can demonstrate that you're smart and are a good candidate because of your background. You'd probably need good GCSEs to stand a chance of getting in though, as one of their main concerns would be whether you'd be able to write essays to high academic standard.

Alternatively, I would go the route of lying and saying I went to some extremely obscure unverifiable college - one deep in the sahara desert or perhaps in the antarctic.

Good luck - I'm jealous, would love to live in Japan for a few years. Nearly applied for the JET programme a few years ago but decided against it, but its nice that they let you do it up until you're forty. Tick tock...
Old 3rd September 2011
  #75
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Zombie H's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ghost blankets View Post
I actually live and work in Japan, so I can fill you in on some ways that my friends have handled this.

If the idea is simply to live abroad and get involved in the scene, why don't you consider going to school in Japan? There are a number of International Schools that basically beg people from other countries to attend (they'll typically drop the normal tuition costs) just so they can claim that they have students from all over the world attending. There are programs that you can do in English and with a student visa you would be able to work as much as you wanted at an English school. Friends of mine worked part-time at two or three different schools (there is usually a B.A. requirement to work "full-time". Also, you can make a lot of money doing private and corporate lessons once you've made some connections... knowing people is really important here, so just make friends with everyone that you can).

I'm not sure about a program that caters specifically to your desired degree, but if you looked around you might find something and you won't go broke doing it. you'll also have plenty of time to play/see gigs.

my 2 cents. maybe you'll find it helpful.
A good comparison is studying French in France as a foreigner it's a good back door to getting a carte de sejour (work permit) which let you study and live/work at the same time
Old 3rd September 2011
  #76
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Simonator's Avatar
 

Thanks again to everyone for the suggestions.

So far, this Distance learning - University of London - UoL - online education - Undergraduate is about the most tempting option I've found.

* Highly prestigious University of London degree.

* INCREDIBLY affordable (~£3000 for most degrees).

* Most of the assessment is simply by sitting annual exams... held virtually in virtually every country around the world.

* One course (creative computing) has modules in digital audio/synthesis.
Old 3rd September 2011
  #77
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Westlaker's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldeanalogueguy View Post
they are the crappy useless classes that you have zero interest in, have no value, waste your time, costs you tuition money, and have nothing to do with what you want to do or learn.

example
history, english, psychology, sociology, philosophy, physical education ("gym"), latin, chemistry, foreign languages, and so on, when you want electronics engineering, math, physics, acoustics, music, etc.
Well, a university should not be confused with a trade school, and it's not really designed for students who are only looking to develop a single, narrowly focused, utilitarian, employment-oriented competence. Which is fine. That's what trade schools are for.

And for the record, I am not aware of any serious institutions of higher education that require "physical education" courses.
Old 3rd September 2011
  #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simonator View Post
Thanks again to everyone for the suggestions.

So far, this Distance learning - University of London - UoL - online education - Undergraduate is about the most tempting option I've found.

* Highly prestigious University of London degree.{??????} sez who?

* INCREDIBLY affordable (~£3000 for most degrees).

* Most of the assessment is simply by sitting annual exams... held virtually in virtually every country around the world.
{how long will it take you to sit for all of them?} {are their exams required for things you do not know?}

* One course (creative computing) has modules in digital audio/synthesis.
make sure oman accepts it

checkign on them i found at least 4 "university of London"s including variations suchs as u in london, adjective u of/in london, etc. schools that are not accredited.

one lost their accreds in 2005. others never had it.

you need to check out UOL **AND** their alleged accreditor. make sure both are legit.

yours seems to be affiliated with some questionable schools which would make it easier for someone to discount their degrees as acceptable.

make sure oman accepts it. for you only oman seems to matter. good luck.

Last edited by oldeanalogueguy; 3rd September 2011 at 07:03 PM.. Reason: additional info added
Old 3rd September 2011
  #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JES View Post
Dear Simonator,

I obviously touched a nerve or hurt your feelings or something since you're now calling me names ("whiny bitches" -- really?). So please accept my apology, I did dash off my post quickly and was responding to several things at once. Since you appeared unclear on what I was saying, I will explain myself.

When I said: "If you think learning in a range of fields is bull****, then a BA isn't for you."

I was responding to oldanaloguy who had said "they are the crappy useless classes that you have zero interest in, have no value, waste your time, costs you tuition money, and have nothing to do with what you want to do or learn.

example
history, english, psychology, sociology, philosophy, physical education ("gym"), latin, chemistry, foreign languages, and so on, when you want electronics engineering, math, physics, acoustics, music, etc."

Which is right above my post, and which you quote right in the post immediately before the one before you say to me "who said that?" Now, we can debate what "range" means but what I mean is that most well educated, interesting and smart people I know may excel in some amazing way at one thing--music, cooking, writing, fixing cars, whatever. But they always have some unrelated interests, and sometimes those interests even creep into their work in kind of amazing ways. You can't know that ahead of time everything that is relevant to what you think you want to do, and that's the value of a well-rounded degree. For example, if you want to do audio, I can think of dozens of ways knowledge of chemistry might be really relevant, depending on what you want to do. Same with psych or sociology. I'm not saying it would be automatically relevant for everyone, but part of education is checking out a lot of stuff.

My original point wasn't that everyone should get a BA. It was that nobody who isn't interested in going outside their immediate comfort zone should get a BA. (And BTW many many major universities and colleges do not have a gym requirement.)

Now if you just need a degree to teach in Japan, then go ahead and order one and pay your money and you'll have it. And it is certainly true that you don't need a degree to work for yourself -- or to make good music (though I think oldanaloguy and I are going to disagree on everything in this thread: Bill Gates is a bad example for that argument: he went to Harvard).

All I'm saying is that it's not the same, and just because you're good at music doesn't automatically mean you're good at everything you'd encounter in the course of a good degree program. Will you need it? Who knows. I never needed the squaredancing classes we had to take in elementary school but quantitative methods turned out to be pretty handy even if it's not directly relevant to what I do on a daily basis. I'm glad you excelled in a course, but a good mark in a single course means you've got lots of potential. With both teaching and music (and probably anything else) it takes a long time to get good.

All that said, there's lots of crap programs out there with bad teachers, silly requirements and where there is an explicit money grab, so I'm not saying all educational institutions are good or beyond reproach. Just that education can and should be something more, a lot more, than credentialing.

This is gearslutz, not educationslutz (I can imagine it, though -- "can anyone actually tell the difference between my University of Phoenix BS in business and this other guy's Harvard MBA in a blind test?"), but it seemed like a point worth making.

Anyway, once again I am sorry I upset you. I judged you to have a thick skin from some other threads, I wrote the post quickly and I didn't mean to flame.

Good luck with your move and I hope you are able to do what you want to do.
yup
uni is not trade school

but for an engineer/scientist time wasted on worthless usless crap liberal arts courses is time taken away from winning the nobel prize by getting a better education in their specialty area. besides stealing 3-4 years of their most productive time they are demotivating.

we need the free market in schools. you get to take what you want. 120 semester hours = degree. if you want to write your phd (and some guy did) on the court martial of lennie blazkovich during ww2, go for it. and good luck making a living.

uni is not a trade school, but unless you are independently wealthy you need to temper what you take with what you need to make a living.

gym, poetry, history, yada yada have ZERO value for anyone other than the teachers of those subjects.

it is time to break the cycle of abuse !

no more required crap courses.
Old 3rd September 2011
  #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CfNorENa View Post
Well, a university should not be confused with a trade school, and it's not really designed for students who are only looking to develop a single, narrowly focused, utilitarian, employment-oriented competence. Which is fine. That's what trade schools are for.

And for the record, I am not aware of any serious institutions of higher education that require "physical education" courses.
when I went to my local uni they all did.
when my son went to MIT they did to.

is MIT serious enough for you ?

and my local uni has top depts in CS EE Math and Physics by most surveys.
Old 3rd September 2011
  #81
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Westlaker's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldeanalogueguy View Post
when I went to my local uni they all did.
when my son went to MIT they did to..
Just checked the MIT website -- and I'll be damned: they DO have a phys ed requirement! Interesting. Learn something new every day, I suppose.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldeanalogueguy View Post
is MIT serious enough for you ?
heh

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldeanalogueguy View Post
and my local uni has top depts in CS EE Math and Physics by most surveys.
And I think it is quite right for many students to major in those sorts of subjects. But I also happen to believe that some systematic exposure to Humanities courses will help them develop into well-rounded, independent minded, critical-thinking, and broadly informed citizens. I agree that we don't need 10,000 new PhDs every year in Art History and Philosophy. But we're all better off, as a society, if the computer scientists know a bit about history, and the molecular biologists know something about ethics.

And I still think Simonator should get a bachelor's degree in Japanese.
Old 4th September 2011
  #82
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldeanalogueguy View Post
bullbleep
all history is crap (paraphrasing) henry ford

history is fairy tales rewritten by the winner of the last war - some famous old german guy (perhaps bismarck )

we need freedom not mandatory wasting of our time on useless crap courses to get a meaningless degree so that some HR weenie can filter out job applicants without having to know anything about what is really needed to do teh work.

if history and literature yada yada have value let them prove it by competing without being required
As a student of history, I disagree. History, like any Humanities subject is about analysing and retelling human stories, as individuals or groups, it is about looking at sources critically and learning to express your own conclusions. It doesn't even have to be true to have value as something thought provoking or add depth to our perception of the present world around us. As to whether it need be a component of a degree, I agree with you insofar as I would probably find an engineering subject irrelevant to my skills or interests.
Old 4th September 2011
  #83
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L-feld's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldeanalogueguy View Post
if history and literature yada yada have value let them prove it by competing without being required

as to critical thinking - it has never been done in any liberal arts class although they keep hyping that as a plus for their crap.
I'm gonna go ahead and say that the English courses are pretty important. At my undergrad, students were required to take two English courses; one on basic grammar and one on technical writing. I think they should have required far more.

if you've ever worked on a research team and drafted a thesis with said team, you probably understand why these courses are required.

On a side note, it's funny that you place math classes in such high regard. I have a friend who just graduated with an undergraduate degree in math and another who is finishing his masters in math. They both have indicated to me that those degrees are viewed by the job market as "soft" and "esoteric" versions of "practical" degrees like computer engineering.
Old 4th September 2011
  #84
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Id say going to school in japan makes a lot of sense - alot of what you pay for in university is that social circle of people in the local community that then (theoretically) goes into the local work force getting jobs in their field.

do you like kimchi Simonator?
Old 4th September 2011
  #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldeanalogueguy View Post
bullbleep
that fascist approach is killing our country
and our freedoms
Disagree. "Freedoms" is an illusion. We aren't "free", most of us never were. Period.

Not sure what you mean by the term "fascist"? The West is currently dominated by Liberalist Political, Social and Economic Ideologies.

Imo CfNorENa is quite correct when he mentions the virtues of receiving a well-rounded education as opposed to ONLY hammering in one particular field of study.

I'm not claiming that a student should be overloaded with too many extra-curricular courses which would indeed waste his or her time but imo it's not ideal to cut them off completely from other fields of study in favour of their chosen field.

University, amongst other things, is supposed to educate.


Quote:
we need CS majors who know security not history
True but it doesn't hurt to know a few rudimentary basics.

Quote:
all history is crap (paraphrasing) henry ford
I assume what Ford meant was that much history, as taught in books written by the victors of wars or invented by historians with agendas or through ignorance and lack of information is "crap".

REAL history (or at least, the closest representation of FACT vs historical fiction which is often taught as "fact") is a fascinating subject.

There's much truth in the saying that those who remain ignorant of the mistakes of history are doomed to repeat them. If anything the subject (I'm talking about the reality, not the candy coated nonsense often written in books) is an amazing eye-opener with regards to the properties of human nature.

Quote:
history is fairy tales rewritten by the winner of the last war - some famous old german guy (perhaps bismarck )
The victors of wars usually write fairytale versions of history which is then taught in their Universities (aka Indoctrination Centers) but any serious student would do his / her own research instead of being spoonfed the current Party Line.


Quote:
we need freedom not mandatory wasting of our time on useless crap courses to get a meaningless degree so that some HR weenie can filter out job applicants without having to know anything about what is really needed to do teh work.
Most people wouldn't know what to do with real "freedom" and would be scared witless by it. They'd be lost. People are pack animals, they prefer and feel more secure within a "system".


Quote:
if history and literature yada yada have value let them prove it by competing without being required
Let's differentiate between fairy-tale history (ie propaganda & lies) and pulplit vs real history and literature (the literal literature).

I agree that much of it (the fake stuff) is worthless. However, it's rather arrogant and presumptuous to dismiss all history and literature as having "no value". History & Literature form a part of the overall human knowledge base just as scientific knowledge forms a part of the overall knowledge base.

You cannot go around pretending that some have "no value" whilst others do.

Quote:
as to critical thinking - it has never been done in any liberal arts class although they keep hyping that as a plus for their crap.
Imo not many people are capable of critical thinking. It's perhaps not an easy thing to teach... either a person has the capability and chooses to use it (or not) or they don't have the capability. Imo TV, the media etc are going to utmost lengths to destroy what little "critical thinking" remains in people.

Quote:
we need to force every person to take the full boat of math so they can all learn to actually think. and also take the first two years of systems thinking.
There is certainly value in teaching people maths and scientific subjects.

Quote:
we have too many lawyers in congress wondering why they get unintended consequences when any freshman in systems could tell them that they are violating the principles that would prevent the problems.
The problem is that scum rises to the top and today there is an epidemic of greedy lawyers, doctors, bent politicians, media propagandists and sick Social Engineers from Academia Land who rob and poison society.

Quote:
we have too many scientists that dont understand why a huge complex nonlinear system (like the weatehr) will naturally change on its own (and has done so many times without man or SUVs being involved) and will tend to sync with things like solar activity and has nothing to do with man made carbon dioxide.
As far as I can tell one of the major "inhibitors" in the "scientific understanding" of weather patterns and earth "warming" and "cooling" = MONEY.

There's big money to be made and gained (research grants from Corporations, Govts etc etc) to promote for example, "Global Warming".
It's a big scam in other words.

Many scientists probably understand this, they are not completely stupid.

However, they are GREEDY and for the right price, they will draw the "right scientific conclusions" for those who pay the bills.....

Quote:
ethics would be good. then the alleged scientists wouldnt rig the data to "prove" there is global warming in order to get a govt grant to prove what was assumed and dont pay no nevermind to the truth.
That's right

Quote:
with systems thinking economists would stop postulating straw men and proving theorems about how they should act and then complaining when real people dont do what their theories say they should because real people are not modelled accurately by the strawmen.
Don't think systems thinking will do much for Economists. The real problem is one of corruption and greed.
Old 4th September 2011
  #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L-feld View Post
On a side note, it's funny that you place math classes in such high regard. I have a friend who just graduated with an undergraduate degree in math and another who is finishing his masters in math. They both have indicated to me that those degrees are viewed by the job market as "soft" and "esoteric" versions of "practical" degrees like computer engineering.
Don't confuse current trends and fads from "the job market" as being the be-all and end-all arbiter of what has value and what doesn't have value. (And there's more to value in life than money or the $ )

OK, perhaps maths degrees aren't "in vogue" atm (I don't know whether they are or not) but it is a qualification which paves the way for one to tackle any engineering or scientific related field. It's certainly not a waste imo.

My guess would be that the perceived lack of market interest for mathematical qualifications could be related to the US's offshoring of manufacturing and engineering industries. A suicidal policy imo.

Just because there is an over-abundance of near worthless "humanities" related jobs and McJobs which employ legions of the braindead it doesn't mean that things couldn't change tomorrow when things turn sour.
Old 4th September 2011
  #87
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Simonator's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zombie H View Post
do you like kimchi Simonator?
The Korean spicy cabbage dish?

I don't mind it?

Why, can I get an easy degree in it? heh
Old 4th September 2011
  #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asbak View Post
Don't confuse current trends and fads from "the job market" as being the be-all and end-all arbiter of what has value and what doesn't have value. (And there's more to value in life than money or the $ )

OK, perhaps maths degrees aren't "in vogue" atm (I don't know whether they are or not) but it is a qualification which paves the way for one to tackle any engineering or scientific related field. It's certainly not a waste imo.

My guess would be that the perceived lack of market interest for mathematical qualifications could be related to the US's offshoring of manufacturing and engineering industries. A suicidal policy imo.

Just because there is an over-abundance of near worthless "humanities" related jobs and McJobs which employ legions of the braindead it doesn't mean that things couldn't change tomorrow when things turn sour.
I agree that there is more to life than the job you can find, which is another reason humanities education is important.

What are these worthless McJobs to which you refer? Can you give me some examples?
Old 4th September 2011
  #89
Lives for gear
 

Why not use all your experience and knowledge to write a hit record?

Then just fly yourself out to Japan to hang with your girl. . . while you write more hit records.
Old 4th September 2011
  #90
I've often thought about doing something similar, but a non-profit kind of thing, where i found somehow funding to get it rolling.

but it's just a dream i have. probably never could happen.

it'd be great to offer kids interested in the subject a real education that didn't put them in debt and jobless at the end of it, like i was. that is NOT a good feeling or a fun road to travel down.

and making it small one on one classes with real actual experience behind a board (gasp) would make it easier to do i think, and less costly as there wouldn't be alot of classes going on and less availability.

but alas, such things could probably never happen.



half on the topic, half off.
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