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Do any washing machines made today not suck
Old 25th September 2019
  #1
Lives for gear
Do any washing machines made today not suck

I'll spare you the details but long story short my POS washer that was only 2 yrs old is history. It was a "Hotpoint" (made by GE who near as I can tell can't make anything worth a flip), this new one is Whirlpool, but the more I research and hear from others, most if not all washing machine brands are total junk and you're lucky if you get more than 5 years from them. Wow really? Are there none made to last any more?
Old 25th September 2019
  #2
I own a set of Whirlpool Oasis machines. They have served me well so far. One thing about washers and dryers that's important to know. Parts do wear out and will need replacement. The heating element on the dryer will eventually begin to wear out, heating less and less over time. The washers have plastic bushings that also wear out that in time will cause the spinning rotor to fall out of balance.

It's a good idea to get your machines inspected on a timely schedule as suggested by the manufacturer to avoid trouble.
Old 26th September 2019
  #3
Lives for gear
Thanks - yeah I get that. I DON'T get it happening within a year or two (or even a few more), that's ridiculous. I have ear buds that out-lasted my last piece of junk. Yeesh
Old 26th September 2019
  #4
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

I hear you. When our washer was out of warranty by about two hours it stopped dead while in the wash cycle, full to the top. That was fun. The dryer's probably less than three years old and the door doesn't want to stay shut. My wife says Velcro, I say Glock.
Old 26th September 2019
  #5
Lives for gear
lol

I NEVER buy those extended warranties - until now. Bought this new washer with a 3 yr deal. Pissed that I felt a need but at least whoo hoo I'm guaranteed a big fat 3 yrs cost-free service which will blow my last washer out of the water (pardon the pun).
Old 28th September 2019
  #6
Something else to consider is a Home Warranty. These services are usually one year contracts and they cover all the home's major appliances. Sometimes you have to pay a little extra if something is not covered, but overall you can save quite a bit when something breaks down.
Old 28th September 2019
  #7
Lives for gear
Thanks SG good idea but I rent The washer and dryer are the only things that aren't covered.
Old 8th October 2019
  #8
Gear Head
Our Samsung washer has been problem-free.
When we bought it the salesman said they (washers in general) only last about 7 years nowadays.
Miele dishwasher has been worth every penny.
Old 17th October 2019
  #9
Lives for gear
 
lame pseudonym's Avatar
 

I agonized over that for years. Then one day I just got fed up with myself and bought the first one on the appliance store's page. Screw it. Washing machines aren't evil like Google. You're gonna get owned whatever you do, so you just might as well do whatever's most convenient.
Old 17th October 2019
  #10
Lives for gear
 
GeminIAm's Avatar
Nothing is built to last. Like the perceived German engineering quality you get from a BMW or Merc. Sure, if this was the 90s. Everything is made cheaply. Washing machines are boring, so get the cheapest one and assume it'll need replacing after the warranty runs out
Old 17th October 2019
  #11
Some people swear by the Maytag brand. I've never owned one, but it may be worth it for longest lasting.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #12
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeminIAm View Post
Washing machines are boring, so get the cheapest one and assume it'll need replacing after the warranty runs out
From the outside they could be boring, but they're not all equal. You sometimes need to clean some heavy stains, or to use delicate wash for some silk fabrics, so getting the cheapest might be a pain in the arse if you need special washing cycles. Generally you should look for brands with a history behind it, cause they have a bit of know-how that should come in handy when special care for your laundry is needed. I have a Bosch washer that works fine for 10 years now, but ruined my silk curtains even if I used its dedicated silk program. $800 out the window! I guess it's better to stick with their construction tools that they are known of, and not rely on whatever else they try to manufacture
Old 4 weeks ago
  #13
All I know is that my next door neighbors have a washer/dryer pair from one of those super-expensive joke-on-yuppies 'elite' brands -- and it is ALWAYS going into overload oscillation... you'll hear it getting louder and louder until it's BANGING back and forth against its own inner workings, requiring the user to come racing from where he or she is to deal with it. (And it's happened through a series of tenants, so I'm assuming it's not just someone who can't get it through his or her head not to overload the damn thing.)

FWIW, I inherited a 70s Whirlpool washer and dryer from my old man. He bought them in the 70s, I used them through the end of the eighties up to 2003; I had to have a belt replaced at one point. (And maybe should have had the dryer element looked at but it worked well, anyhow.) They were great. (I also got his old Whirlpool fridge, which was a wonderful machine but finally died in the mid-90s, probably about 20-25 years old. I probably could have got it fixed but at the time I was fresh outta dough and just grabbed a 'dorm room' fridge. (Shoulda got it fixed. The dorm room fridge was poorly designed and small, but did work until I Trotskied it while defrosting.)
Old 4 weeks ago
  #14
Gear Head
Quote:
Originally Posted by theblue1 View Post
All I know is that my next door neighbors have a washer/dryer pair from one of those super-expensive joke-on-yuppies 'elite' brands -- and it is ALWAYS going into overload oscillation... you'll hear it getting louder and louder until it's BANGING back and forth against its own inner workings, requiring the user to come racing from where he or she is to deal with it. (And it's happened through a series of tenants, so I'm assuming it's not just someone who can't get it through his or her head not to overload the damn thing.)

FWIW, I inherited a 70s Whirlpool washer and dryer from my old man. He bought them in the 70s, I used them through the end of the eighties up to 2003; I had to have a belt replaced at one point. (And maybe should have had the dryer element looked at but it worked well, anyhow.) They were great. (I also got his old Whirlpool fridge, which was a wonderful machine but finally died in the mid-90s, probably about 20-25 years old. I probably could have got it fixed but at the time I was fresh outta dough and just grabbed a 'dorm room' fridge. (Shoulda got it fixed. The dorm room fridge was poorly designed and small, but did work until I Trotskied it while defrosting.)
Very possible their machine requires blankets/quilts to be folded a certain way prior to washing to prevent becoming off balance. Many of the newer machines do not have a center post in the washing basket, which I suspect contributes to this issue.
My old low efficiency washer cleaned much better.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #15
Lives for gear
My so called high efficiency washer died after only a couple of years use. Went back to a basic GE washer and haven't had any problems.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #16
Lives for gear
 
DougS's Avatar
 

Had a set of LG uprights that lasted 10 years. When they went out we bought LGs again.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #17
Planned obsolescence...it's good for the economy!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #18
Lives for gear
 

The problem with a lot of appliances is that there are really only a handful of manufacturers. You may buy into the idea that Maytag for example is a "good brand" because decades ago that was in their marketing...but these days they are owned by Whirlpool. You may have that yuppie family member that has a house full of Jenn Air...again its Whirlpool. You may get a cheap deal on Amana....guess what.

And then there's very little going on inside to service...mainly a control board (the brain), the control panel, a heating element, and a motor (plus or minus depending on what appliance we are talking about of course)... I'll use my dishwasher as an example. It came with my house, was brand new, but I estimate it as maybe a $400-500 model initially. Within 18 months, it quit working... Though I am no appliance repair person through some reports online, the control board sounded like a common culprit. It is also covered in epoxy, so you can't really repair a bad component, just buy another board. This makes repair by the homeowner pretty dead simple, but a replacement board is around $100. I sucked it up and replaced the board, and it worked for another year. Then the control panel went out. I replaced that. Then the heating element was recalled because it was a fire hazard, so I let someone replace that (no charge). Then the control board went out, and I picked up a refurbished one at a discount. Then THAT control board went out. Then I gave up. I self serviced to my limits but was not going to keep throwing money at it, and wasn't going to pay $200 for a service call on a $400 dishwasher with a design flaw. My assumption is that the circuit board sealant wasn't that good and eventually water was working its way in there and shorting it out. I suspect at this point most other people would feel the same way. But also, as a two person household I consider a dishwasher a pretty non-essential appliance...so I have elected not to replace it.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #19
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kslight View Post
The problem with a lot of appliances is that there are really only a handful of manufacturers. You may buy into the idea that Maytag for example is a "good brand" because decades ago that was in their marketing...but these days they are owned by Whirlpool. You may have that yuppie family member that has a house full of Jenn Air...again its Whirlpool. You may get a cheap deal on Amana....guess what.

And then there's very little going on inside to service...mainly a control board (the brain), the control panel, a heating element, and a motor (plus or minus depending on what appliance we are talking about of course)... I'll use my dishwasher as an example. It came with my house, was brand new, but I estimate it as maybe a $400-500 model initially. Within 18 months, it quit working... Though I am no appliance repair person through some reports online, the control board sounded like a common culprit. It is also covered in epoxy, so you can't really repair a bad component, just buy another board. This makes repair by the homeowner pretty dead simple, but a replacement board is around $100. I sucked it up and replaced the board, and it worked for another year. Then the control panel went out. I replaced that. Then the heating element was recalled because it was a fire hazard, so I let someone replace that (no charge). Then the control board went out, and I picked up a refurbished one at a discount. Then THAT control board went out. Then I gave up. I self serviced to my limits but was not going to keep throwing money at it, and wasn't going to pay $200 for a service call on a $400 dishwasher with a design flaw. My assumption is that the circuit board sealant wasn't that good and eventually water was working its way in there and shorting it out. I suspect at this point most other people would feel the same way. But also, as a two person household I consider a dishwasher a pretty non-essential appliance...so I have elected not to replace it.
I have an Ariston Hotpoint dishwasher, it's 11 years old, works perfectly, but have used it about 5 times in this entire period of time, so I assume this is the secret for the good longevity of our appliances nowadays.

PS. You truly loved that dishwasher...
Old 3 weeks ago
  #20
@ kslight

Yes, it's called planned obsolescence. It keeps the land fills high and the rubes forking over money.

But remember...it's up to you to reduce the world's carbon footprint.

...and if you don't...we'll tax you into the stone age.

Hmmm...might not be a bad idea

Old 3 weeks ago
  #21
Lives for gear
 
Fay Smearing's Avatar
 

Find a local place that repairs/services appliances and ask them which ones to avoid.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #22
If he tells you that, it's bad for business for him. They're all cowboys in Australian repair/ services aren't they??

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