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-   -   Bizarre vocal trend (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/gear-free-zone-shoot-the-breeze/1257794-bizarre-vocal-trend.html)

bgood 28th March 2019 06:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DistortingJack (Post 13891112)








Everywhere.

I guess we shan’t bother with ryhming lyrics anymore either? What a relief... that’s hard

bgood 28th March 2019 07:04 PM

In all of the videos shared here there’s a common theme... little tiny voices closed mic’d and processed to beyond an inch of death...

It’s not just in pop music... plenty of country and R&I singers nowadays with zero full voice... just little tiny whisper baby voices

It’s what makes somebody like a Chris Stapleton or Pink or Gaga, etc pop out of the speakers...

It’s funny to me when I see a show like The Voice where some judge who has made a career out of having a similar tiny baby whisper voice sits in judgment of an amateur with real pipes

bgood 28th March 2019 07:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lovekrafty (Post 13891155)
I think that vocal style comes down to a pretentious attempt to sound more sophisticated and dramatic

Yeah... like when Madonna picked up a british accent... or Lindsay Lohan picked up whatever that accent she has now, which, in all fairness to her may very well be the result of organic brain damage due to various lifestyle choices

UKtotalitarians 28th March 2019 07:47 PM

An anthropology professor of mine professed “that all languages are pidgins”. That was her book thesis. So, who knows.

>>>>>


A pidgin[1][2][3] /ˈpɪdʒɪn/, or pidgin language, is a grammatically simplified means of communication that develops between two or more groups that do not have a language in common: typically, its vocabulary and grammar are limited and often drawn from several languages. It is most commonly employed in situations such as trade, or where both groups speak languages different from the language of the country in which they reside (but where there is no common language between the groups). Fundamentally, a pidgin is a simplified means of linguistic communication, as it is constructed impromptu, or by convention, between individuals or groups of people. A pidgin is not the native language of any speech community, but is instead learned as a second language.[4][5]

A pidgin may be built from words, sounds, or body language from a multitude of languages as well as onomatopoeia. As the lexicon of any pidgin will be limited to core vocabulary, words with only a specific meaning in lexifier language may acquire a completely new (or additional) meaning in the pidgin.

Pidgins have historically been considered a form of patois, unsophisticated simplified versions of their lexifiers, and as such usually have low prestige with respect to other languages.[6] However, not all simplified or "unsophisticated" forms of a language are pidgins. Each pidgin has its own norms of usage which must be learned for proficiency in the pidgin.[7]

A pidgin differs from a creole, which is the first language of a speech community of native speakers that at one point arose from a pidgin. Unlike pidgins, creoles have fully developed vocabulary and patterned grammar. Most linguists believe that a creole develops through a process of nativization of a pidgin when children of acquired pidgin-speakers learn and use it as their native language.

dublave 28th March 2019 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DistortingJack (Post 13892197)
Honestly I think the sound can be used to great effect when the music does indeed have an element of danger, and that's when they are best by far, artistically speaking.

As someone who comes from a metal background I find it undeniable that there is both real musical talent and a real edge to these, for example:





It's sort of "infantilism gone wrong" that reminds me a bit of the twin girls in The Shining or something.

I find the trend irritating, but have little bad to say about the artists themselves.

I do really like this Billie Eilish track. I think she's doing some interesting things and I'm looking forward to hearing her album later this month.


Quote:

Originally Posted by bgood (Post 13892251)
In all of the videos shared here there’s a common theme... little tiny voices closed mic’d and processed to beyond an inch of death...

It’s not just in pop music... plenty of country and R&I singers nowadays with zero full voice... just little tiny whisper baby voices

It’s what makes somebody like a Chris Stapleton or Pink or Gaga, etc pop out of the speakers...

It’s funny to me when I see a show like The Voice where some judge who has made a career out of having a similar tiny baby whisper voice sits in judgment of an amateur with real pipes

On one hand, sure. On the other I have to say I'm personally relieved the pop world is moving past the days of over-singers like Aguilera and Gaga. Just because you can hit the notes doesn't mean you need to hit all of them in every single song you sing. I'll take restrained baby singing over trilling madness any day. That stuff just sounds like empty imitations of real soul singers.

UKtotalitarians 28th March 2019 07:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bgood (Post 13892251)
In all of the videos shared here there’s a common theme... little tiny voices closed mic’d and processed to beyond an inch of death...

It’s not just in pop music... plenty of country and R&I singers nowadays with zero full voice... just little tiny whisper baby voices

It’s what makes somebody like a Chris Stapleton or Pink or Gaga, etc pop out of the speakers...

It’s funny to me when I see a show like The Voice where some judge who has made a career out of having a similar tiny baby whisper voice sits in judgment of an amateur with real pipes

I’ve thought the same thing since day one of these stupid shows.

AudioGold 28th March 2019 08:12 PM

I very much enjoy pop music and record a lot of pop at my place. But I was just discussing this exact thing with my wife a couple days ago! It drives me crazy sometimes! It’s like they are trying to do an accent mixed with some sort of baby talk, but when you talk to them in person they sound nothing like that!

bgood 28th March 2019 08:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dublave (Post 13892360)
I do really like this Billie Eilish track. I think she's doing some interesting things and I'm looking forward to hearing her album later this month.




On one hand, sure. On the other I have to say I'm personally relieved the pop world is moving past the days of over-singers like Aguilera and Gaga. Just because you can hit the notes doesn't mean you need to hit all of them in every single song you sing. I'll take restrained baby singing over trilling madness any day. That stuff just sounds like empty imitations of real soul singers.

There’s no doubt that Mariah and xtina tend to overdue the 172 tracks of vocal masturbation tracks... and to me that’s no less distracting than a crappy singer honestly

Some of these whisper baby singers are doing interesting material and I’m not speaking about the tunes themselves... just the topic of the thread... the goofy vox

a.m. son 28th March 2019 08:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dublave (Post 13891923)
Funny how this devolved into an old man shouting at clouds kind of thread.

Ya, but you know it’s OBJECTIVE fact that music has totally sucked for at least the past three decades.

toledo3 28th March 2019 08:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dublave (Post 13891995)
I think you're on to something with this. It's like the 50+ year mutation of a faux British accent.

Yeah...but as this has rolled around in my head some more, this guy was a real trail blazer in mush mouth which progressed later into a kinda airy twee delivery. Not Brit like the earlier things I pointed out, but kind of a prototype.




Brent Hahn 28th March 2019 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by toledo3 (Post 13892489)
Not Brit like the earlier things I pointed out, but kind of a prototype.

He's Claudine Longet without the cute accent.

apartment dog 28th March 2019 10:08 PM

There is a lot of this when watching tutorials, or gear demo videos;
'hi guys today we're gonna show this new mic and preamp
we're gonna record a....
singer songwriter''
oh no, now I'll never know how that mic sounds

mumble mumble slurry slurry whisper whisper (and whining whining, but that is not that new)

baby voice; ''why does my sm7b have no gain, guys?''

rosewood123 20th July 2019 07:48 AM

I stopped paying attention to hyper-popular pop music maybe four or five years ago, and I guess I've either been successfully avoidant or I've had my head so far up my ass because I just learned last night that Billie Eilish exists. For whatever reason, it launched a daylong depressed meditation on the current state of pop music interests and the music industry. It's pretty clear that Eilish's breakout song was a breakout because it ticked the "whispery baby vocal" box trend and had a catchy melody and a sad Lana Del Rey aesthetic to it. Plus it helps that she the right look when she got signed.

The newer stuff she put out is being praised for kind of being "unable to be put in a genre" ... and although there's some truth to that, I can't help but feel it's like, yeah, it's just a bit of a collage of all trendy music out there lately. It's "throw in the trendy soft vocals, long vowels, sad aesthetic, vocoder effects, a bit of James Blake and Bon Iver vibe, generic trendy drum patterns and sounds, a bit of Kanye's Yeezus and Tyler the Creator's aggression, bedroom pop production," and there you go. Plus some teenage depressed angst in the lyrics and aesthetic that's symptomatic to a lot of young girls these days, amped up too with deathly imagery in the music videos. I have no doubt that a lot of the pop and indie influences from her brother's experience in music have made their way into the songwriting. So yeah, it sort of just gels a bunch of different elements of pop trends together, and is different in that sense, but seems to be a culmination and combination of pop and hip hop trends starting with Lorde and Lana Del Rey. I can't really blame Billy or Finneas themselves as they're allowed to stay true to what they like, and in a sense, I can commend them for combining their influences into their songs.

One person in another thread said it just isn't about music anymore and is about instagram followers and fame (i.e., more about the promotion and image). It's about putting tracks out there with the same drum beats that will generate money from shows and tour performances, with the promotion being interviews, image, and instagram likes. The point is that the track needs to be catchy and hit certain trendy markers, while the main purpose of it all is more about the media attention and tour revenue.

I suppose much of the music industry has really always been like this, but now there's a more recent shift to transient tracks that will be gobbled up with people moving on to the next thing very quickly.

But watching interviews with Eilish -- and I know she's young, so I should cut her some slack -- and other worse "artist" offenders like Cardi B makes me wish there was less of an emphasis on image and hitting those trendy markers and more on the art of exploring important ideas or topics, on the (at the risk of sounding pedantic) intellectual side of things (and Eilish really isn't too bad an offender relative to other pop artists). Such is the nature of pop music, I guess. I mean, a great book or painting should reach to you on a primal and emotional level, but should also be instructive or a large learning/thinking experience. I expect that in some capacity with the greatest music. I can't help but feel that a lot of pop is the musical equivalent of the Twilight book series.

Lastly, I'm not that old (I'm 26), but damn I feel out of touch with the newest generation. I feel incredibly cynical of social media image and ego grooming and branding, the tired and recycled beats and vocal styles that are pumped out. I'm just left with a bad taste in my mouth. My apologies for the long post, but all of this hit me and I just had to get it out. :lol: As GoldenBear said, though: "It's now at the stage where people are starting to make fun of it, which in pop culture time tends to mean it will last about 3–5 more years and then people will be ashamed of it." I hope so! :lol:

Also, I feel the need to post a Lana Del Ray song to add to the bank of whispery baby voices, although hers has a bit of a drawl to it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QnxpHIl5Ynw

deedeeyeah 20th July 2019 08:49 AM

i recently had to jump in for an engineer who didn't catch his flight (or so; at least that's what i was told):

the tour manager insists on a ridiculous vocal wedge setup (3 wedges, the outside pair stereo) on a rather small stage, i was forced into working with gear i didn't like much (at the missing engineer's request) but nevermind; at line check, things seemed to be good - so soundcheck starts, enters the (male) lead singer, plugs in his hypercardioid mic (which was not on the rider) with lots of output and things are still kinda okay but the rear of the mic now points straight at the center wedge; i wring it out and then the singer starts singing - i go: 'sorry but this mic must be broken', go to the stage and ask whether i might try for myself...

...and almost fell of the stage it was so damn loud!

long story short: he got no voice but kept asking for more level in his wedges throughout the show. no wonder actually 'cause the band was rather loud.
the broadcast engineer later told me that for this reason, they couldn't use a single complete song but had to edit short versions - and that for no money in the world he would have wanted to be in my position! a few more days later i heard that the other engineer indeed didn't make to the plane as he quit the travel party...

whispery voices on wedges - someone tell them that there is such a thing as inears!



p.s. did i mention i couldn't understand a word?

meez61 20th July 2019 09:22 AM

Maxo Kream dropped a new album for all those depressed with the current state of music.

andychamp 20th July 2019 11:16 AM

I guess every „style epoch“ (a BIG word in this context, I know) has its trademark affectations.
In the nineties with grunge it was called „yarling“, as in „friends don‘t let friends yarl“.
It blew over, as will the current wave of gimmicks.
In 20+ years, I may care about what‘s become of it...or not.
In the meantime, current trends make *good* music easier to spot.

UKMK00 20th July 2019 01:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by terrible.dee (Post 14105447)
I watched the girl's video.

Every single one of those "oddities" are post-production artifacts. The results of an artificially create performance.

Flat-line hard tuning, compression/expansion, formant manipulation, clipping syllables to construct "Frankenstein" words the "singer" wasn't able to sing, scrubbing the track so there's no room-tone to give the ear a reverberant context for a new sound, performed in a new spacial setting. The result of which is the ear taking a millisecond to establish the new spacial boundaries of what's being heard, and ignoring the attack onset of the sound its self, although the engineer "...Can see it! It's right there!

It's what happens when people who can't sing found out that the technology exists to make it seem like they can, or when some hot chick/dude's representation wasn't to extend their "Brand" from Modeling in energy drink ads, to music. I'd say it was prevalent on Major Label records too, but I'm a little out of the loop these days and actually, don't know if those even exist anymore....well, a few years back when last I was around this kind of thing...It was RAMPANT, so much that I encountered new artists who had based thier vocal stylings on post-production anomalies.

It's also the result of "[email protected]%k" engineering. Guys who are treat engineering like an athletic endeavor, and could care less how something actually SOUNDS. Just as long as it hits certain markers to show what "magicians" they are.

F%$K am I glad I left this end of the business behind....I HATED IT.

Modern recording SUCKS.

Because you SUCK at it...

Brent Hahn 20th July 2019 04:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by terrible.dee (Post 14105447)
... It was RAMPANT, so much that I encountered new artists who had based thier vocal stylings on post-production anomalies.

A few people here, including myself, have reported instances of tracking young singers -- talented ones -- who sing as if they've already been processed through unsubtle Autotune. They probably don't even know what it is they're emulating. Like the Australian lyre bird, that mimics the sounds of chainsaws as they destroy its habitat.


joeq 20th July 2019 07:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brent Hahn (Post 14105842)
A few people here, including myself, have reported instances of tracking young singers -- talented ones -- who sing as if they've already been processed through unsubtle Autotune. ..

I had one recently who did this. She did a perfect job of sounding like Autotune except for the "tune" part. Nailed the artifacts, though.

dublave 20th July 2019 09:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rosewood123 (Post 14105373)
The newer stuff she put out is being praised for kind of being "unable to be put in a genre" ... and although there's some truth to that, I can't help but feel it's like, yeah, it's just a bit of a collage of all trendy music out there lately. It's "throw in the trendy soft vocals, long vowels, sad aesthetic, vocoder effects, a bit of James Blake and Bon Iver vibe, generic trendy drum patterns and sounds, a bit of Kanye's Yeezus and Tyler the Creator's aggression, bedroom pop production," and there you go.


I think your description is fairly accurate, but at the same time I don't think it necessarily has to be a bad or inauthentic/insincere thing. That's not a bad recipe if you ask me. As far as big commercial pop music goes it's pretty interesting stuff. Plus she's a seventeen year old woman who dresses in weird baggy clothes and has so far refused to overly sexualize herself. That in itself is a positive step for pop music. I fully acknowledge, being exactly double her age, that I don't necessarily "get" the 90s mall goth aesthetic she's going for, but at the same time I'm happy kids are still doing weird stuff that people older than them don't fully understand. Seems right.

Her album has a few tracks that I like, but I think it was this song that really made me sit up and pay attention to her. Definitely a jam.



I know the truth of the matter is that less commercial pop will almost always be the stuff that really resonates with me the strongest. But I still like to give stuff a shot. These are definitely strange days with social media magnifying all of the image based nonsense of the pop world. But it's not like that stuff didn't exist before. The commercial pop world has always had its bull****. As long as you take it for what it is I still think you can have fun with it though while still having a more fulfilling relationship with whatever it is that does get you excited.

rosewood123 20th July 2019 10:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dublave (Post 14106302)
I think your description is fairly accurate, but at the same time I don't think it necessarily has to be a bad or inauthentic/insincere thing....

Your post makes lots of sense. I am definitely aware that I'm coming at this from a really cynical perspective. I think that's why I feel such conflict -- that she has so far remained true to herself, hasn't overly sexualized herself, and naturally embodies and encapsulates the personality and image of really young people these days. Combining multiple pop/indie rock/hip hop/EDM influences to create something "new" in that "collage" sense is definitely cool for the pop world. I think I do understand the goth aesthetic; it brings the sadness, fear, but also the willingness to face and represent the sadness and fear to the pop world on a newish level. Although emo and and this type of approach have existed for years, she puts EDM, vocoder music, and contemporary pop into that world. Thinking of Lana Del Ray, Lorde, Bon Iver, etc., those singing and vocal effects styles existed outside of the super dark "deathly" aesthetic. The song that you linked is good for certain reasons, but again, it reminds me of Immogen Heap and other autotuned stuff. Which isn't necessarily or inherently negative, and if someone enjoys it, that's all cool with me. So yeah, it's a positive and new step for pop music when really considered.

But yes, that's my conflict: That I can't totally say Eilish's stuff is as bad as and a total extension of other worse stuff in mega commercial pop ... while it still draws from and synthesizes ongoing trends from commercial pop. That said, I like some of the songs on the album and think they have good things going for them, especially Bury a Friend. It's cool that she has the baggy clothes thing going on and comes across as genuine in how she's dealing with being so young with so much fame.

I will get over all this within a few days, and you are spot on in saying, "The commercial pop world has always had its bull****. As long as you take it for what it is I still think you can have fun with it though while still having a more fulfilling relationship with whatever it is that does get you excited."

chessparov2.0 21st July 2019 12:44 AM

Must_listen_to_some_Aretha_now.
"Whew I feel better already!":heh:

Hey, originally I thought this thread could just be about... The 60's Sunshine Pop group, Harpers Bizarre.
At least they feelin' Groovy! (always wondered who that could have been)
Chris

DistortingJack 21st July 2019 01:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rosewood123 (Post 14106366)
it reminds me of Immogen Heap and other autotuned stuff.

Imogen Heap is a genius and most of us would be lucky to have half her production skills.

robert82 21st July 2019 01:55 AM

Melisma is the throat disease of the current age.

And I don't know what to call it, but ending a phrase with that warbly thing. Singers with really good voices destroy their sound with this affectation.

rosewood123 21st July 2019 03:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DistortingJack (Post 14106649)
Imogen Heap is a genius and most of us would be lucky to have half her production skills.

Hey, I wasn't trying to say Imogen Heap is bad, nor are her vocal effects bad. Just that something in pop reminds me of her ... meaning that Imogen is the OG. :lol: She is very good live as well.

bgrotto 21st July 2019 04:11 AM

Always struck me as a sort of millennial version of the John Fogerty thing.

monkeyxx 21st July 2019 04:49 AM

I'm just glad I learned the phrase "whisper baby singing" so I don't have to always call it "hipster singing" which is a similar term I got in another thread.

I think the fact that everyone is talking about Billie Eilish says something about her significance.

Not that I'm a huge fan or anything, but pop music is fun to observe and take part in from time to time. All the moods, styles, occasional substance. There's a lot to it.

dublave 21st July 2019 04:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by monkeyxx (Post 14106775)
but pop music is fun to observe and take part in from time to time. All the moods, styles, occasional substance. There's a lot to it.

Agreed, this is my general approach. I’m usually well on the outside, but it’s still fun to observe and cherry pick what I do like about it.

jazzcabbage 21st July 2019 05:27 AM

https://i.kym-cdn.com/entries/icons/...19/304/old.jpg