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How Did/Do You Receive(d) Music Education?
View Poll Results: How did/do you receive(d) music education?
Private Solo Formal Instruction
4 Votes - 21.05%
Private Group Formal Instruction
3 Votes - 15.79%
Private Solo Non Formal Instruction
3 Votes - 15.79%
Private Group Non Formal Instruction
1 Votes - 5.26%
Other (e.g. Church, Internet e.g. YouTube, etc.)
5 Votes - 26.32%
All Of The Above
6 Votes - 31.58%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

Old 31st October 2017
  #1
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boombapdame's Avatar
 

How Did/Do You Receive Music Education?

Share your experiences regarding music education.

Last edited by boombapdame; 6th December 2017 at 05:44 PM..
Old 1st November 2017
  #2
Gear Nut
 
Kaatza Music's Avatar
 

I attended 4 years of university and obtained a Bachelor of Music in Composition and Theory in 1976.
Old 1st November 2017
  #3
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didlisquat's Avatar
Listening to D.C. Go~Go music in the early eighties.

..that is as close to educated as I have ever been.
Old 1st November 2017
  #4
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foamboy's Avatar
Junior high and high school band. I am a drummer. Of course most of my real education came from my passion to learn drums, which meant I hunted down some great influences. This was before internet, so magazines, friends, liner notes (which sadly almost don't exist anymore) and that kind of stuff. Public school education was a really great way to get an almost nearly free education. That is why I try to support inner city band programs and other organizations that try to keep school band alive.

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Old 1st November 2017
  #5
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Unclenny's Avatar
Learned the chords for "Louie Louie" and "House of the Rising Sun" in 1965.

Jammed with everybody I could through the 70's.

Took those four chords that stuck and wrote songs around them 70's, 80's 90's.

Joined Gearslutz University in 2007.



Old 2nd November 2017
  #6
Gear Maniac
 
roaringwave's Avatar
Learned music theory in Grade school through HS. Learning the alphabets (theory) of music is probably the most important thing about music that I have ever learned. Not knowing theory to me is like trying to write a NY times Bestseller without knowing how to spell a single word. I urge anyone to learn theory. It helps and saves alot of time knowing that you have an indispensable arsenal of theoretical knowledge to apply to your musical endeavors. I'm not implying that you learn to read music like a professor. No. I'm just saying that you should know and understand the notes of the C Major scale and what are the numerical/values (degrees) all the way up to the octave. Knowing this alone is the 'sole' key to understanding all chords and scales. Just learn and understand the C Major scale first and everything else afterwards is nothing but another branch/offshoot that is derived from the 'Tree of the C Major Scale.' PS. Many professional musicians cannot sight read music (Hendrix, Prince,etc), but best believe that these musicians knew their scales and chords (theory). All the best.
Old 4th November 2017
  #7
I learned in the back alleys.

I really wanted to learn how to play music as a little kid but I was told by two different music teachers I had "absolutely no musical talent whatsoever." I get it that they were trying to save me frustration and my parents money, but I found it rather crushing. It didn't stop me from trying -- but, sadly (and I take a reasonable share of the blame here), it gave me an easy 'out' when, after 6 or 8 months of thumping on the $18 box I was still fumbling over the same 6 chords...

That $18 would be $143 today -- but you wouldn't spend $20 of today's money on it, though I still have it; it was almost unplayable from the git-go but maybe it's just as well I didn't realize how unplayable it was, since I finally managed to learn how to bash out cowboy chords and even, through sheer force of will, barre chords on it when I was about 20.

I've mostly picked up my music education in bits and pieces.

Probably the single most important thing I learned, that really opened things up and helped set me up for songwriting, was an informal lesson one of my acid-rock playing pals gave me after I'd been playing a year or two. I still couldn't figure out the relationship between keys, scales, chords. I mean, it was MYSTERY. My pal sat me down at his mom's piano and gave me an informal half hour/45-minute lesson where he showed me how to harmonize the diatonic scale (make triads out of the notes going up the scale). We didn't really get to the real mysterious stuff (like modulation and how scales can change in different parts of a song) -- I sort of puzzled a lot of that out on my own, particularly when trying to figure out how to play blues (thank HEAVEN I didn't focus on the shortcut of playing simplified penta scales, though I recognized it -- and the power of those simple relationships)... as a consequence, I probably unconsciously internalized more of the rules than I learned outright.

Now, after decades of playing at various levels in different approaches, I've been concentrating on really building the ability to play what I hear/feel, the sort of 'natural' musicality that seems to spring unbidden in others but which, for me, has been a decades long path...
Old 4th November 2017
  #8
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brockorama's Avatar
 

A piano is a good way to see everything in a linear way. Each octave repeating in a straight line. It's a great place to start, even if the guitar seems more appealing.

For guitar, it becomes more important that you actually know what each note on the fretboard is to speak fluently. The scale ends at the top of the fretboard,(and continues on the next higher string) and the B-C and E-F relationships will push or pull the scale.

Watching a newish guitar player trying to express themselves in a minor scale has made me wince on occasion with wrong notes being fretted because they are trying to solo in a triad major pentatonic fashion, but will eventually reach a point where the scale has been pushed or pulled and the note will actually land between the fret markers (for example) , highlighting the fact that a note can appear on a fret marker on one string, however on a higher string, the same note will not.

Once a certain amount of theory has been learned in these principles, it is the modes (ie dorian etc), that will allow the more advanced musician to speak more freely and in more interesting ways, based on their choices as to which notes in the scale they will actually begin and end their musical phrases on, all in an attempt to embellish the chosen key and accompanying chord progression in the best possible light.
Old 9th November 2017
  #9
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BarcelonaMusic's Avatar
 

I come from a musical family-it`s in the genes(my young nephews are doing it now on their own, with their uncle 1000+ miles away). All 3 of my uncles were/are musicians. I grew up around it as their respective bands practiced across the street at my grandmas house. I was always there. They were teaching me from my earliest memories(like 1977). I would say I really took it seriously at 8 years old. I just started learning from them. I briefly took lessons and learned modes, circle of 5ths, etc. But it`s just a big combination of everything. The way I feel about is they are just tools- an extension of your mind. Just like a wood/stone carver gets good with his chisel.
Old 9th November 2017
  #10
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bitman's Avatar
Get yer ya yas out.
Old 10th November 2017
  #11
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BarcelonaMusic's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bitman View Post
Get yer ya yas out.
Playing along with other bands made me REALLY good. Moreso than anything else.
Old 23rd November 2017
  #12
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I took lessons briefly but almost all of mine comes from either my musical family or picking it up on my own. Such as it is.
Old 28th December 2017
  #13
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Libalf's Avatar
 

I attended a music school for 3 years, took some lessons and made some self-educational practice such as an analysis of music I listened to, used youtube tutorials... I am a piano player, also a little bit violin, however, I'm not big into it





__________________
“The aim of totalitarian education has never been to instill convictions but to destroy the capacity to form any.” ― Hannah Arendt
you'd like to spend your time on music, not for unnessecery essays and research papers, wouldn't you? then you can use /essayshark.com/ and make your student's life much easier
Old 29th December 2017
  #14
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I voted before I got the skinny

Anyways, I had some private lessons but the best education I got was from MI. Yeah it was just a summer session (because my parents suck even though they had money) and I scratched all the checks myself, but I got a better understanding of music and how to deal (or not deal) with others. A good private instructor.

I mean, it was a rip off, but I was serious. So I got what I could from it. LA is a sucking pile of crap BTW, I lived right behind the Chinese Theater Wow, what a garbage pit.

Did the best I could with it. Didn't have a great career but at least "I" knew what the hell I was doing.
Old 30th December 2017
  #15
Quote:
Originally Posted by toowrongfoo View Post
[...] LA is a sucking pile of crap BTW, I lived right behind the Chinese Theater Wow, what a garbage pit.

[...]
Quote:
A traveler has been walking for several days in a lonely land, without seeing a sign of civilization. He comes up on a hill, looks down and sees signs of a township down below. But, he is not sure if it would be worth his while to walk all the way, just to visit the township. As he is pondering the question, a wise man, with a long gray beard and hair flowing down his shoulders, appears from nowhere. The traveler approaches the wise man and inquires about the inhabitants of the town at the bottom of the hill: "What kind of people live there? Are they nice and friendly?"

The wise man gazes intently at the traveler and asks, "Tell me about the place from which you come. What kind of people live there?" The traveler says, "Oh! Don't even remind me of that. My hometown is full of dreadful people." The wise man says, "It's no different here. You will find the same kind of people in the village below."

Days go by. Another traveler arrives at the same hill and spots the village down below. Again the wise man materializes out of the thin air. The same conversation takes place, but the second traveler says that his hometown is full of wonderful people. The wise man responds, "You will find the same kind of people in the village below."
Viewing Others Through Our Glasses

Last edited by theblue1; 30th December 2017 at 10:25 PM..
Old 16th January 2018
  #16
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Carnalia Barcus's Avatar
 

I didn't vote, partially because I don't know what the difference is between "formal" and "non-formal" in the poll.

Anyway, I took private lessons on two different instruments, at times from four teachers at once, starting when I was six years old (drums, I added piano a couple years after that) and continuing through my undergraduate years. In my teens I also taught myself bass, and in my 30s I taught myself guitar finally.

I had a fantastic music teacher in elementary school. We even put on full Broadway shows in elementary school. I played drums for those mostly.

I was in concert band, orchestra, marching band and jazz band in jr high and high school.

I was in bands of my own, too, starting when I was 11 years old.

When I was 14, a freshman in high school, I also started gigging through my high school band director, who is a great jazz trumpet player.

When I was in eleventh grade, I started taking some music classes at the local community college, too. The director of the local community college music department was someone I was doing gigs with when I was in high school--he and my high school band director were good friends.

Then I went to music school, undergraduate and graduate. I went off and on, because I was gigging at the same time. I eventually finished my degrees, though, in theory/composition. I also went back to school later to do philosophy degrees. Just because it was something else I was always interested in.

I've been working as a musician, composer and arranger for about 40 years now.
Old 19th January 2018
  #17
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I got a Segova SG copy with one string and 1/2" action and started copping Duane Eddy tunes from the albums. I took lessons for like 6 months but tired of the teacher sitting there ripping through scales my whole lesson. The day I asked to learn Misty Mountain Hop and he broke out in this jazz version of the tune was the last day of lessons. After that I wore the grooves off a lot of Zeppelin LPs. Old man was in the junk business, so I'd grab all the Zeppelin I could find at yard sales, etc.

Took theory in high school. The teacher was a burner, didn't know it at the time but found out later. I used to have it second period, so my morning's dose of wacky 'baccy was still in full effect. He'd make all kinds of mistakes explaining something, wrong note values for example, and I'd correct him. This was every class. I thought he was just in the early stages of dementia at the time, but when he told me later in life he was baked too we both laughed our asses off. This was in the late 70's early 80's.

Side story, the HS band had a record player that would spin backwards. I talked that teacher into letting us play Hotel California, Stairway and I think a couple of Beatles tunes backwards. Another time the class screened A Clockwork Orange at my request. Ah, the good old days...

I don't see that as an option on the poll.
Old 19th January 2018
  #18
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memristor's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boombapdame View Post
How Did/Do You Receive Music Education?
I didn't.

When I was a kid we had a piano at home for while and I improvised on that.
And I learned to play recorder on the very basic level, the most simple childrens songs.

At school I was very bad in music class even though I was the only one who composed music.
Old 19th January 2018
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by memristor View Post
I didn't.

When I was a kid we had a piano at home for while and I improvised on that.
And I learned to play recorder on the very basic level, the most simple childrens songs.

At school I was very bad in music class even though I was the only one who composed music.
I started on the recorder, too.

But I soon grew tired of its limitations.


I mean, you hit the play button, you hit the stop button, just not much room for personal expression there. I'm glad I discovered musical instruments.




[sorry]
Old 19th January 2018
  #20
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memristor's Avatar
 

It always confused me that it's called recorder in English.
Old 24th January 2018
  #21
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My dad had a set of ocarinas I learned to play. Same fingering as the recorder and less confusing name.
Old 25th January 2018
  #22
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Smoking my mates bong and listening in hushed awe to everything from Shostacovich to techno white labels to Sun Ra to Throbbing Gristle and the Residents. Oh and John Peel.
Old 25th January 2018
  #23
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Upright piano in the basement, I was maybe 7. Bench full of sheet music, Mom gave me a quick rundown of how it worked and went back upstairs.

Got a terrible bass and an okay amp when I was 13, got in a working cover band and had to learn 40 songs. Learn 40 songs well enough to not get kicked out of a band, that's a decent start.

Also subbed once or twice in a country band led by a pedal steel player with a very country name, Roy Spibbs. Never really got the repertoire down with Roy's stuff, but it didn't matter as much and he got his money's worth. Discovered I really liked traditional country, which in that decade wasn't yet traditional, it was just country.

Got an electric guitar a year later, got in a different band on guitar a year after that, got in my high school stage band the year after that (charts with crazy chords!), managed to not get kicked out of that as well. Came close, though.

Went to college, met some guys in another cover band, they lost their bass player, I was handy, so playing bass again. The guitar player in this band was in another band, very progressive and fusion-y, more charts and crazy chords and speed and too many notes, wound up playing with them.

And so forth.
Old 25th January 2018
  #24
Quote:
Originally Posted by onewire View Post
My dad had a set of ocarinas I learned to play. Same fingering as the recorder and less confusing name.
Old 26th January 2018
  #25
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FreshProduce's Avatar
I am forever learning
Old 26th January 2018
  #26
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12tone's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FreshProduce View Post
I am forever learning
Old 26th January 2018
  #27
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12tone's Avatar
 

Just want to say, so there's no confusion:

The more you know, the more you know you don't know.”

― Aristotle
Old 26th January 2018
  #28
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FreshProduce's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12tone View Post
Just want to say, so there's no confusion:

The more you know, the more you know you don't know.”

― Aristotle
Is that supposed to be an attack on my enttellijance!?
Old 26th January 2018
  #29
Grandmother got a piano for my older sister, who soon tired of it, but the story goes I would claw my way up onto the piano bench and noodle around. Being the youngest child, and perhaps the last chance to make good on the investment, I was given lessons, by an amazingly foresightful teacher who drilled the theory of music into my impressionable noggin.

Then, in college, I stumbled on the remarkable co-incidence that if you started the Beatles song "Yesterday" at the same time as the FDR speech announcing the attack on Pearl Harbor ("Yesterday, December seventh, nineteen forty one...") they will both arrived at the word "suddenly" at exactly the same time! ("Suddenly, I'm not half the man I used to be..." & "were suddenly and deliberately attacked...")

And, so, in my mind anyway, that's what got me to here and today.
Old 27th January 2018
  #30
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Unclenny's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpatterson View Post
And, so, in my mind anyway, that's what got me to here and today.
That explains a lot, Joel.

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