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How Did/Do You Receive(d) Music Education?
View Poll Results: How did/do you receive(d) music education?
Private Solo Formal Instruction
4 Votes - 21.05%
Private Group Formal Instruction
3 Votes - 15.79%
Private Solo Non Formal Instruction
3 Votes - 15.79%
Private Group Non Formal Instruction
1 Votes - 5.26%
Other (e.g. Church, Internet e.g. YouTube, etc.)
5 Votes - 26.32%
All Of The Above
6 Votes - 31.58%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

Old 12th July 2018
  #31
In high school I played trumpet and tuba in band and took a music composition class where one day a week we could go to the computer lab and work on our assignments using Midi sequencing software on old green screen Mac IIs.
Unfortunately it was two students per computer because the school only had 10 of them.

I’m fortunate to have gone to school in times where the schools still had the budgets for such things.
Old 13th July 2018
  #32
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollowman9 View Post
I’m fortunate to have gone to school in times where the schools still had the budgets for such things.
Uh...you're apparently out of touch.
Old 14th July 2018
  #33
Quote:
Originally Posted by onewire View Post
Uh...you're apparently out of touch.
I’m married to an elementary school teacher....
Old 15th July 2018
  #34
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hollowman9 View Post
I’m married to an elementary school teacher....
Ouch. I'm sorry. Phillie doesn't necessarily translate to the rest of the country. I'd go so far to say kids are better off without the crutches. Learning how to use a laptop isn't the same as learning what a 'ratio' means. You know. Stuff I learned in elementary school? Percentages?

My neighbor brought her daughters "school issued' iPad down twice to see if I could fix it when it froze up on her. Both times the lessons were about Environmentalism. Nothing more than a seminary. Go wander around a campus after lunch. Trash strewn all over the place. Wonder what all those extra bins are for?
Old 21st July 2018
  #35
Lives for gear
 
BarcelonaMusic's Avatar
 

Pretty much everyone in my large family is a musician, so one of my uncles started teaching me when I was about 8 on guitar. I took lessons for a bit, but I found I got best when I played along with cassettes by my favorite bands. Best of all, Appetite For Destruction. Guitars are panned hard left and right for each player, so you could be "Slash" or "Izzy" by panning them out left or right and playing with the rest of the band. Best learning experience ever. I spent hours every day doing that with every tape I could find, even if I was playing along with them.
Old 21st July 2018
  #36
Quote:
Originally Posted by onewire View Post
Ouch. I'm sorry. Phillie doesn't necessarily translate to the rest of the country. I'd go so far to say kids are better off without the crutches. Learning how to use a laptop isn't the same as learning what a 'ratio' means. You know. Stuff I learned in elementary school? Percentages?

My neighbor brought her daughters "school issued' iPad down twice to see if I could fix it when it froze up on her. Both times the lessons were about Environmentalism. Nothing more than a seminary. Go wander around a campus after lunch. Trash strewn all over the place. Wonder what all those extra bins are for?
As a product (victim?) of traditional math pedagogy I have to say that the brief period where I studied new math, philosophy of math, symbolic logic, and other related stuff in middle school -- before my family moved to a district with a decidedly 19th century approach to education (and a fixation on sport championships that put me in the class of a championship-delivering coach who also sort of tried to teach math) -- I would have benefitted FAR more from a little less such 'traditionalism.'

As it was, my math aptitude on college boards was in the top few percentiles and I always ended up with A's -- but I took away NOTHING of practical value. I could do the work. I puzzled it all out from the book (as did 3 others in our 30+ student class while the rest of the college prep class -- who could not do the work at all -- were given D's that the school administration upped to C's). But I understood nothing.

Within five or six years, I actually found myself having to 'reconstruct' how to do long division by hand when the mechanical calculator at my job went belly up. I was shocked and amazed on some level -- but my math teacher had so thoroughly turned me off to math that I apparently just blotted all the rote-learned formulas and algos. I had no real way of integrating them into my life or even remembering them because they had been taught in a virtual intellectual vacuum where integrated understanding was a foreign concept. And that is really sad, because I now realize that there were very important tools there for helping to understand the real world -- and, in particular, the world of sound.

Having experienced both modes of education, progressive and traditionalist, I'm all for intelligent, disciplined progressive education, grounded in comparative analysis and evidence-based thinking and not passive acceptance of authority and rote education.
Old 13th September 2018
  #37
Lives for gear
 
Bob Ross's Avatar
 

I guess all of these would count as the "formal" part:
- private flute lessons with the elementary school band director when I was 8 years old
- joined the elementary school concert-band within a year of that. Played in the school concert- and marching-bands for the next 4 or 5 years
- took group guitar lessons the summer I was 11 or 12 years old
- took private guitar lessons pretty much non-stop from age 14-17
- took semi-private (there were two other guys in the class but they almost never showed up) music theory & arranging class with the high school band director for two years
- played drums and sang in the high school chorus for two years
- played guitar for the high school "pops" band for half a year
- played contrabass and tympani in the high school orchestra for one year
- went to a 4-year undergraduate college and earned my Bachelors of Music degree; this involved both group (ensemble) and private lessons on bass
- went back to get my Masters of Music (2-year program) a dozen years later; this involved both group (ensemble) and private lessons in composition and conducting

The "informal" part consists of all the usual shenanigans one does as a growing musician: Starting a rock band in junior high school with my buddies, playing in other people's bands, jamming with local musicians, then hustling gigs as a freelance bass player for 20+ years, yadda-yadda-yadda...
Old 14th January 2019
  #38
Gear Maniac
 

I received my music training at a private music school in Sydney called JumboNote Music School predominantly doing individual lessons in piano and singing and joining the bands. I work there now, and it has really come of age since I was a student there full of performing opportunities, tv shows, albums etc. Music Lessons - JumboNote, the Leading Music School in Sydney
Old 19th January 2019
  #39
Lives for gear
 
Rogue Ai's Avatar
Smashed instruments together for 12 years until music started falling from the sky...
Old 30th November 2019
  #40
Here for the gear
 
MadelineThom's Avatar
 

I studied with a professional musician. He devoted a lot of time to me. He could even write papers for me if I didn’t have time to do school homework. I will always be grateful to him, because he is the teacher that every student needs.
Old 30th November 2019
  #41
Here for the gear
 
lukeprenzel's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MadelineThom View Post
I studied with a professional musician. He devoted a lot of time to me. He could even write papers for me if I didn’t have time to do school homework. You can write him here https://papersowl.com/write-my-paper-for-me I will always be grateful to him, because he is the teacher that every student needs.
I also prefer individual teachers. I’m a little more comfortable when the teacher gives me his attention. Only in this way I can learn something new effectively.
Old 30th November 2019
  #42
Lives for gear
 
memristor's Avatar
 

Not sure if Ive alread answered in this thread and what I said but the true story is:

I didnt
When I was four my father picked up a piccolo recorder and tought himself to play barock music.
A year later he decided to teach me that, and tried to explain everything in one lesson:
reading notes and how to play recorder.
I already could read but wasnt schooled and didnt know the alphabet.
So the naming of the notes didnt make any sense.
At any rate it was much too much for a first lesson, and not at all how you teach a kid to play.
He decided it was too difficult for me.

Somewhere later I learned to play recorder, at school I guess, I dont recall.
Not really well at all, but I basically learned the notes you need.
Really first lessons stuff only.

Years later when I was about 14 we had a piano for a while.
But I wasnt tought to play, no one else played, except for my step father once or twcie a year when he was asked for (he played fairly well and once was a pro musician on viola but had given it up - He became kind of allergic against the classical repertoire he had to play over and over.)
I just played along on my own when I was allowed to, improvised.
He once showed me how you put your hands correctly and that was my other single lesson).

At music class I was a total failure. I hated it. In hindsight I assume I was the most musical person in class, regardless. I wanted a synthesizer and a 4 channel recorder. My step dad gave me a two channel tape player whcih I used to experiment with, but unfortunately I broke something it when I had to change a transmission ribbon.

Thats my education.
Old 30th November 2019
  #43
Lives for gear
 
IM WHO YOU THINK's Avatar
 

In elementary school (3rd grade), I played trumpet, trombone, and baritone. I was instructed to choose one, and I stayed with trumpet. (I'm glad nobody made Trombone Shorty choose.) I learned how to read between 3rd and 8th grade. There was no $$$ for piano lessons, but I always wanted to learn. A neighbor gave me a bass, and I would program drum machine parts at his house. He had some piano books, and I'd practice at his house. Also, my grandma played, and she had a piano.

I used to buy song books and play the trumpet parts, and that eventually lead to learning the piano parts. Somewhere along the way, I picked up a music theory class in college, and bought a few guitars.
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